Mathematics Facilities

Library and Electronic Media

Mathematics Faculty and students have access to a monograph and journal collection which is housed in the James Earl Carter Library on the Georgia Southwestern campus. Other resources needed for research and study can be obtained through the Library's efficient interlibrary loan system. Students and faculty also can use the University System of Georgia's on-line, virtual library, GALILEO, using terminals in offices, the library, dormitories, and in numerous computer labs located around the campus. Galileo's numerous databases allow users to retrieve current journal articles on-screen, as printable files, or as portable document (pdf) files which may be viewed using Adobe Acrobat Reader software. The Library's monograph and journal collection, supplemented by Galileo and other Web resources give our faculty and students an active window on evolving mathematical topics. In addition, many faculty supplement their lectures with personal web sites on Southwestern's Faculty Web. Some of the sites were developed the old fashion way, using HTML, while others use the full power of such on-line courseware as WebCT. You can get the feel for designing an on-line course yourself by visiting one of the many WebCT tutorial sites on the net, for example, the OFFICIAL site.

Computer Labs and Software

Mathematics students can use the new Mathematics and Science PC computer lab, housed on the third floor of the Roney Building, and just next door to the Math and Science Building. Our students can also use lab facilities in the School of Computer and Information Science (PC and SunSparc workstations), and the Power Macintosh lab in the School of Education. Our small campus makes all these lab facilities easily accessible from dormitories, classrooms, and parking areas. All computer labs are on the campus network, and have internet access via Peachnet.

Mathematics students at Georgia Southwestern start using technology as a means of exploring mathematics immediately. Our College Algebra, Precalculus and Calculus I courses all require familiarity with a graphing calculator such as the TI-83. In more advanced courses, students use a variety of software packages including Maple, Minitab, Mathlab, Mathematica, Macsyma, MacMath, ODE Architect, Interactive Differential Equations, and IDL. Majors are required to take at least two computer programming courses: Introduction to Structured Programming, and Advanced Structured Programming, which are currently focused on C++. The Department also encourages students to gain additional computational experience in other disciplines, either by taking a minor in computer science, or by taking any of a variety of classes with a strong modeling and visualization element like the Department of Geology and Physics' courses in Remote Satellite Sensing and Geographic Information Systems.

Teaching Facilities

Mathematics courses are taught in classrooms in the Math and Science Building, in the Business/History and Political Science Building, in labs in the School of Computer and Information Science and in the School of Education, and in a state of the art Electronic Classroom in the Roney Building. Smaller classes are often taught in faculty offices, or in classrooms in which a small computer network has been set up to give students access to high speed computers and sophisticated computer algebra system (CAS) software.