Studio Concentrations


Ceramics

Glass

Sculpture

Painting And Drawing

Photography

 

Printmaking

Digital Media


Ceramics

Photo Gallery | Functional | Sculptural | Wood Fire | Outreach 
Study Abroad China | Study Abroad Ghana

Philosophy

The history of ceramic art represents our collective human history. It is in light of this fundamental character of clay and the human imagination that we develop work in our current context. We have a strong commitment to materials and process as core to the conceptual development of art. Priority is given to both critical thinking and skill development. Clay has both sculptural and functional potential each residing within the history and tradition of Craft. Students are introduced to both contemporary theories of art and the growing field of Craft Theory. Students are encouraged to pursue excellence and attain a high level of craftsmanship.

Class sizes are small with an average of 8 to 12 students. Students receive as much faculty help as they desire. All full time students within the ceramics program are eligible for a variety of department wide scholarships awarded each year. (These are one-time monetary awards) 

Integrated into the course content are various readings that introduce students to the history of aesthetics and contemporary theory. Students are encouraged to relate these concepts to their work as a way to develop both knowledge of the history of aesthetic theory but more importantly to develop their own informed ideas within our contemporary context. Students will see themselves within the ongoing development of art’s history and so choose their direction within that context. As such, advanced students are encouraged to develop a cohesive body of work within a variety of techniques, both traditional as well as experimental.

Ceramic Facilities 24 Hour 7 days a week access

  • Studio Space
    The ceramics studio is a fully equipped space with ventilated kiln room 
    and separate clay-mixing area.
  • 2 large Alpine updraft gas kilns
    Shimpo oval electric kiln
    Other electric kilns
  • Wheels
    9 Shimpo wheels
    6 Brent CXC Wheels
    3 Kickwheels
  • Slab Roller
  • Ceramics students also have access to the glass cold working equipment.
  • Students have individual shelves and lockers

Glass

Photo Gallery | More Student Works  | GSW Glass History | Fritz Workshop 2011

Glass students are challenged to understand historical and contemporary art issues with emphasis placed on the development of personal expression, conceptual exploration, and craftsmanship. Instruction focuses on glassblowing, casting, fusing, and mixed media assemblage. Interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged with other media areas. Ongoing critiques are essential in the development of craftsmanship and the articulation of ideas.

Facilities/Equipment

Hot shop equipped with:

  • 3 glory holes
  • Annealers - 4 large, 2 medium, and 2 small
  • 300 lb. furnace
  • 4-pot color furnace
  • garage

Cold shop equipped with:

  • Lap wheel
  • Diamond saw
  • Wet sander
  • Wet drill press.

Sculpture

Photo Gallery | BronzeCasting

Sculpture students are challenged to understand historical and contemporary art issues with emphasis placed on the development of personal expression, conceptual exploration, and craft. Instruction focuses on woodworking, welded steel, casting, and mixed media assemblage. Interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged with other media areas. Ongoing critiques are essential in the development of craftsmanship and the articulation of ideas.

Facilities:

  • 2,500 square foot studio
  • Wood shop
  • Metal shop
  • Foundary (capable of casting bronze and aluminum)

Painting and Drawing

Photo Gallery | More Student Works

DRAWING:

Drawing is the fundamental language of the visual arts. It is the way we record observations, plan projects in all other media and graphically "think". Learning to draw is really learning to see. The basic skills focus on methods of graphically visualizing using a variety of traditional and non-traditional materials and methods.

Drawing foundation courses are geared to introduce fundamentals regardless of students' initial abilities. Still life, architecture, landscape and figure drawing are explored along with development of problem solving skills and personal concept. Advanced courses emphasize further enhancing skills while encouraging individually directed ideas using various drawing methods.

PAINTING:

All art students take beginning painting. Due to our small class size, each student is assigned a personal studio area with 24/7 access. The course is designed to introduce techniques and exploration of oil painting, wood shop tool use and stretcher construction, and builds on the color theory/application from 2-d Design. Oil paint is emphasized to not only allow students to explore this medium, but also as an avenue towards deepening appreciation of its use during the history of Western art. Beginning students are directed to utilize self-generated ideas and concepts while learning basic techniques and skills.

Intermediate and advanced courses focus on personal concept development and experimentation with a wide variety of paints (oils, acrylics, etc), formats and mixed mediums.


Photography

Photo Gallery | More Student Works |  Annual Trip to Atlanta Celebrates Photography | Study Abroad  |  Women (and Gender) in Photography

The photography concentration immerses students in the technical, conceptual, and historical aspects of the medium and prepares them for a range of career options. Students begin with instruction in the fundamental principles of photography by learning to operate a manual 35mm camera and process their own film and gelatin silver prints. Assignments transition from highly technical to highly conceptual as students discover their own intensely personal expression with the medium. Critique forms the crux of the learning experience, and assigned readings and written assignments develop skills in critical analysis. As students progress, they learn to work with large format and studio lighting, and to print using color, and alternative processes, as well as further developing their skills in traditional black and white printing. They also have full access to our digital lab with film scanner and large format color printer enabling them the ability to explore digital photography and multi-media options. In addition to 24/7 studio access, class size is small, with a cap of 15 students, and allows for ample working space. The faculty is very accessible and works intensively with each student to produce a professional caliber portfolio.

Americus is within driving distance of Atlanta, and each October is Atlanta Celebrates Photography month. During this month, the photography students participate in a field trip to Atlanta to explore museum and gallery venues, attend lectures and demonstrations, and take advantage of the cultural offerings of this important annual event.

Study abroad classes in photography are also offered during the summer terms.

Facilities/Equipment

  • Studio Space
    700 sq ft. Open studio space with film processing sink/counter space
    4 100 sq ft darkrooms 
    1 125 sq ft darkroom for large format and alternative process printing
    1 150 sq ft darkroom for color printing
    Individual students shelves and lockers in each darkroom and in classroom space
  • Enlargers
    1 – Omega D5-XL Super Chromega Dichroic 
    5 – Besseler 23C
    1 – Besseler 45MX
  • Mac Pro
  • Epson Scanner
  • 20” Kreonite C-41 color processor
  • 30” x 40” light table
  • 24” x 30” dry mount press
  • 5 - 16” x 20” rotary paper cutters
  • 1 – multilevel fiberglass screen drying rack (holds up to 20” x 24”)
  • 4” x 5” Calumet monorail view camera
  • Variety of Digital SLR Cameras and Camcorders
  • Holga Medium Format Cameras
  • 35mm Film Cameras
  • Variety of Lighting Gear
  • Variety of Backdrops for in studio shooting

Printmaking

Photo Gallery

Printmaking is an essential skill for all art majors. It is a process that is critical in the development of both western and non-western art and an important skill for every future artist to acquire to be well equipped. The Printmaking program focuses on investigation in both practice and theory. Priority is given to both critical thinking and skill development. Students will be expected to pursue excellence and attain a high level of craftsmanship.

The introduction to printmaking course emphasizes Relief and Intaglio processes through 8 separate print assignments. Students will produce zinc plate intaglio prints with hard-ground, soft-ground, aquatint, and other techniques. Students will also produce woodcut prints producing multi-block multicolor prints focusing on the goal of consistency within an edition. Students are also introduced to a variety of other techniques such as monotype, monoprint, collograph, and some photo processes. Class sizes are small with an average of 8 to 12 students and a cap of 15 students. Students receive as much faculty help as they desire. All full time students within the print program are eligible for a variety of department wide scholarships awarded each year. (These are one-time monetary awards) 

Integrated into the course content are various readings that introduce students to the history of aesthetics and contemporary theory. Students are encouraged to relate these concepts to their work as a way to develop both knowledge of the history of aesthetic theory but more importantly to develop their own informed ideas within our contemporary context. Students will see themselves within the ongoing development of art’s history and so choose their direction within that context. As such advanced students are encouraged to develop a cohesive body of work within a variety of techniques both traditional as well as experimental.

Facilities:

  • Studio Space
    1550 sq ft. Open studio space 
    156 sq ft Ventilated Acid Room with sink
    64 sq ft Darkroom with sink
  • Presses
    1 – Sturgis Etching Press (28” x 48” Pressbed)
    1 – Griffin Etching Press (26” x 46” Pressbed)
    1 – Griffin Lithography Press
  • 2- 23” x 40” Stainless steel acid baths (Nitric)
  • Large 3’ x 6’ washing basin (2 additional sinks in open studio)
  • 1 Bench Grinder
  • 2 Hotplates (2’ x 3’)
  • Paper cutter
  • Metal Plate cutter
  • 2 Large multilevel drying racks (78 levels in total)
  • Multiple paper soaking trays (3’ x 4’)
  • Aquatint Box with compressed air
  • Ink mixing table (31/2 ’ x 7’)
  • 16 Litho-stones
  • Individual students shelves and lockers

Digital Media

Photo Gallery | Sample Videos

The digital media concentration emphasizes student engagement with the theory and practice of time-based, new media art, to include digital video, web art, digital photography, as well as multimedia installation. Students gain facility with a variety of computer software tools that enable them to generate, edit, and manipulate digital information for output in print, video and interactive web applications to be viewed within a fine art context. Critique forms the crux of the learning experience, and assigned readings and written assignments develop skills in critical analysis. The concentration requires versatility, experimentation, and a strong interest in new media theory/discourse as well as a willingness to question and push the boundaries of traditional art-making praxis. Students have 24/7 access to a fully equipped Mac lab with dual monitor video editing stations, scanners and a large format printer. In addition to 24/7 studio access, class size is small, with a cap of 15 students, and allows for ample working space. The faculty is very accessible and works intensively with each student to produce a professional caliber portfolio.

Facilities/Equipment:

  • 5 – iMacs
  • 2 – Mac Pros
  • 2 – G5s with dual monitors for video editing
  • 1 - HP Designjet Z3200 large format, permanent pigment ink jet printer
  • 1 - Projector

Software:

  • All computers are equipped with the following software:
  • Adobe Creative Suite 6 (Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Dreamweaver, Flash, Fireworks)
  • Final Cut Studio 2
  • Final Cut Pro
  • Microsoft Office Suite