Programs

 


BABFAStudy Abroad

BA

The BA degree program was begun at Georgia Southwestern State University prior to 1970. Though designed, like the BFA, according to the precepts of technical skill, critical thinking and conceptual development, the BA degree in Art is considered to be more of a liberal arts degree as it has fewer hours in art studio concentration, no required upper division art history and does include an academic minor. Historically, the BA students have used the minors for splitting their interests in computer science, accounting, marketing, and other academic fields. This degree has been designed to provide students with flexible academic programming options that best fit post-baccalaureate objectives and career goals.

All BFA and BA students fulfill the Sophomore Review requirement. This portfolio review occurs every Spring Semester for those students who have completed the majority of the foundations art courses: Drawing 1,2; Design 2-d and 3-d; Art Survey 1,2 or are transfer students bringing the equivalent basic art credits from another institution. Students are expected to present a gallery-ready portfolio of ten pieces that demonstrate proficiency in basic skills and indicate potential studio/degree direction. They are also required to submit as part of this review, a five-page research paper in which they locate their interests as indicated in their portfolios within the history of fine art from the past 50 years. Each participant is given a 15-20 minute critique by the art faculty that stresses basic progress and deficiencies with beginning level skills, craft, conceptual direction, and art historical research. The outcomes of this review are written and oral recommendations for students to remedy weaknesses seen in the portfolio and/or paper, pursue areas which show strong development, and suggest future directions.

Likewise, all BA students are required to participate in a senior exhibition and to submit a senior exit paper. The expectations for the exhibition and paper vary for the individual student and their specific studio concentration. Although the outcomes will be varied in kind and quality, we maintain high expectations that all senior exhibitions will be appropriate to each individual student. Exhibitions and exit papers are monitored in the Thesis/Exhibition courses with seniors and their major concentration professor. The goal of the senior paper is a finished artist’s statement for use at the exhibition itself and/or for future use for graduate school applications, alternate career applications or seeking gallery exhibition opportunities. During the spring of 2007, all students were required to present a digital portfolio of their work.

BFA

The BFA degree program in the Department of Art provides an intensive experience in the practice, theory, and history of the visual arts, with a particular focus on professional-level training and concentrations in studio arts. The BFA degree program is designed according to the belief that sound critical thinking and conceptual exploration, as well as talent or skill, form the basis of the production of art. Problem solving, frequent critiques, and student responsibility for the reasoned explication of his or her work form an important part of the educational process. After demonstrating competence in the foundation areas of drawing, design, and a survey of art history, students are introduced to a wide range of materials and media, eventually concentrating in a particular area: ceramics, drawing, glassblowing, computer graphics, painting, photography, printmaking, or sculpture. The culmination of their work is a senior exhibition and written thesis focused on a coherent, professionally presented body of work. This final portfolio provides material for applications to graduate programs, galleries, and other professional art employment opportunities.

All BFA and BA students fulfill the Sophomore Review requirement. This portfolio review occurs every Spring Semester for those students who have completed the majority of the foundations art courses: Drawing 1,2; Design 2-d and 3-d; Art Survey 1,2 or are transfer students bringing the equivalent basic art credits from another institution. Students are expected to present a gallery-ready portfolio of ten pieces that demonstrate proficiency in basic skills and indicate potential studio/degree direction. They are also required to submit as part of this review, a five-page research paper in which they locate their interests as indicated in their portfolios within the history of fine art from the past 50 years. Each participant is given a 15-20 minute critique by the art faculty that stresses basic progress and deficiencies with beginning level skills, craft, conceptual direction, and art historical research. The outcomes of this review are written and oral recommendations for students to remedy weaknesses seen in the portfolio and/or paper, pursue areas which show strong development, and suggest future directions.

All BFA students are required to participate in a senior exhibition and to submit a senior exit paper. The expectations for the exhibition and paper vary for the individual student and their specific studio concentration. Although the outcomes will be varied in kind and quality, we maintain high expectations that all senior exhibitions will be appropriate to each individual student. Exhibitions and exit papers are monitored in the Thesis/Exhibition courses with seniors and their major concentration professor. The goal of the senior paper is a finished artist’s statement for use at the exhibition itself and/or for future use for graduate school applications, alternate career applications or seeking gallery exhibition opportunities. During the spring of 2007, all students were required to present a digital portfolio of their work.

The BFA degree curriculum has been designed primarily to respect the diverse talents of students and to set a bar of high expectations. No portfolio entrance requirement exists for incoming students, which, in turn, creates a group of beginners with a wide range of both skills and deficiencies. Foundation courses address these issues by providing projects and assignments that increase basic drawing and design proficiency and a basic understanding of art history. These courses also build beginning-level skills, reinforce library/research methods and construct an overall learning environment that promotes and rewards self-discipline, high energy and hard work.

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