Courses

Projected Course Offerings

Here are the anticipated course offerings for the next three years.

History Courses

HIST 1111. World Civilization I. A survey of world history to early modern times. (3-0-3)

HIST 1111H.  World Civilization I. - Honors.

HIST 1111S. World Civ I - Study Abroad. A survey of world history to early modern times. (3-0-3) Taken as part of a study abroad experience.

HIST 1112. World Civilization II. A survey of world history from early modern times to the present. May be taken before HIST 1111. (3-0-3)

HIST 1112H. World Civilization II-Honors.

HIST 1112S. World Civ II-Study Abroad.

HIST 2111.  United States History I. This course focuses on American history from the discovery of the Western World through the Civil War. A passing grade in this course satisfies the U.S. history and Georgia history requirements of Georgia State Code 20-3-68.

HIST 2111H. United States History I-Honors.

HIST 2112. United States History II. This course focuses on American history from Reconstruction to the present. A passing grade in this course satisfies the U.S. history and Georgia history requirements of Georgia Code 20-3-68. (3-0-3)

HIST 2112H. United States History II-Honor.

HIST 2500. The Study of History. This course is an introduction to the study of history. Required of all history majors. 2 credit hours. (2-0-2)

HIST 3510. American Colonial History. Major developments between 1492 and 1789 are explored. (3-0-3)

HIST 3510H. American Colonial History-Honor.

HIST 3570. Civil War-Reconstruction. This course is an in-depth study of the Civil War and Reconstruction period of U.S. History, focusing on the background, political, social, economic, and military aspects of the period. (3-0-3)

HIST 3730. History of the Old South. This course examines the history of the South from the colonial period to the outbreak of the Civil War. Topics for study include the economic system of the Old South, slavery, antebellum Southern politics, and social and intellectual patterns of the Old South. (3-0-3)

HIST 3770. Black-American History. The focus of this course is the role of Blacks in the Western Hemisphere, with special emphasis on the struggles of African-Americans for equality and their contributions to American progress. (3-0-3)

HIST 3810. History of Georgia. This course surveys Georgia history from the beginning to the present. This course is of particular significance to prospective teachers in elementary and secondary schools. A passing grade in this course satisfies history of Georgia and the Constitution of Georgia requirements of Georgia State Code 20-3-68. (3-0-3)

HIST 4540. US History, 1877-1920. This course focuses on American history from the rise of populism through the Progressive Era, 1877-1920. (3-0-3)

HIST 4551. US History 1920 to 1945. This course surveys United States history from the end of World War I through World War II. (3-0-3)

HIST 4561. US Social History. Selected and representative social, cultural, and intellectual themes in American history are explored in this course. (3-0-3)

HIST 4562. History of American Women. Selected and representative social, cultural, and intellectual themes in American History from the colonial era to the present. (3-0-3)

HIST 4050. Early Modern Europe. This course entails topical discussions of intellectual traditions and institutional structures in European history from 1648 to 1815. (3-0-3) 

HIST 4150.  Renaissance and Reformation. This course provides an introduction to European history from the fourteenth century to 1648, focusing on the Italian Renaissance and the varuious religious Reformations of sixteenth century Europe. (3-0-3)

HIST 4160. History of Medicine.  This course will examine the history of medicine in a wide social context covering the impact of medicine on intellectual, economic, institutional, and cultural relationships from antiquity to the present.

HIST 4100. 19th Century Europe. This course focuses on the political, economic, and social history of Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I. (3-0-3)

HIST 4110. Europe in the 20th Century. This course explores the history of Europe since 1914.  The main political, social, economic, cultural, international, and intellectual movements are considered. (3-0-3)

HIST 4120. Modern Russia. This course examines the development of Russia from the reign of Peter I to the present democratic government. It addresses the geographic setting and the medieval background of Russia history including the reforms of Peter I, the institution of serfdom and the efforts to retain and reform it, Russia's cycle of war, revolution and civil war at the beginning of the Twentieth Century, the Soviet State, the Second World War, the Cold War, and the collapse of Communism. (3-0-3)

HIST 4130. Eastern Europe. This examines major events in the history of Eastern Europe. Among the major topics covered will be the Byzantine Empire, the Ottoman Empire, The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Hapsburg Empire, national revivals, the World Wars, Communist domination and the collapse of Communism. The class will examine the political, cultural and economic aspects of these topics. (3-0-3)

HIST 4140. History of Modern Germany. This course examines the development of Germany from medieval times to the present.  The geographic setting and the medieval background of German history are addressed. Major topics covered are the Reformation, the 30 Years War, the unification of Germany by Bismarck, Hitler and the Nazi period, the Second World War, the Cold War and the collapse of Communism. (3-0-3)

HIST 4600. History of England to 1603. This course engages students in a careful study of the major events in the history of England to 1603. (3-0-3)

HIST 4610. History of England Since 1603. This course engages students in a careful study of the major events in the history of England since 1603. (3-0-3)

HIST 4780. History of the Middle East. This course covers the broad sweep of Middle Eastern History and culture of Northern Africa. (3-0-3)

HIST 4781. History of North Africa. This course is designed to familiarize students with the history and culture of Northern Africa. (3-0-3).

HIST 4782. Gender and Minorities in the Middle East and North Africa. This course explores the history of gender and minorities in the Middle East and North Africa. (3-0-3)

HIST 4000. Historiography. This is the capstone senior seminar course required of all history majors. It entails a survey of leading writers who have produced the major historical works, with special emphasis on the intellectual and cultural influences that helped to shape their historical interpretations. Prerequisite: 15 hours of upper division history or permission of the instructor. (3-0-3)

HIST 4900. Special Topics in History.  Selected issues, problems, and literature in history are addressed in this course. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chair. (3-0-3)

HIST 4920. History Internship. History related internships are available for qualified students. See the Coordinator of Intern Programs for information.

HIST 4930. History Internship. History related internships are available for qualified students. See the Coordinator of Intern Programs for information. (3-0-3)

 

Political Science

POLS 1101. American Government. American political institutions and processes and their development over time are carefully examined in this course. A passing grade in this course satisfies the U.S. and Georgia Constitution requirements of Georgia State Code 20-3-68.        (3-0-3)

POLS 2101. Intro to Political Science. This course is a  general introduction to the scope of political science, including types of governments, the variety of institutions and processes, political concepts, and ideologies, and to the methods used to study political phenomena Required of all political science majors. (3-0-3)

POLS 2201. State and Local Government. This course focuses on the organization, powers, functions, and political processes at the state and local levels, as well as the relationship between the state and national governments. A passing grade in this course satisfies the Georgia Constitution requirement of Georgia Code 20-3-68.

POLS 3200. Intro to the European Union. This course examines the development of the European Union. It is the basic course for students participating in the E.U. Certification Program. (3-0-3)

POLS 3205. Intro to Comparative Politics. This course introduces the comparative method of studying political systems, with an emphasis on institutional arrangements and political behavior found in democratic and non-democratic political systems in various regions of the world.         (3-0-3)

POLS 3210. Modern European Governments. This course entails a study of the constitutions, basic principles, governmental organizations, political party systems, and political methods of major countries in Europe. (3-0-3)

POLS 4100. American Political Parties & Interest Groups. This course involves a careful study of the two main types of political organizations in the United States which serve as linkages between the people and their government: political parties and interest groups. The focus is on the development of political parties and interest groups, their structure and operations, and their roles in the political system. (3-0-3)

POLS 4460. The Legislative Process. The focus of this course is the structure, functions, and behavior of state and national legislative bodies. It emphasizes composition, leadership, procedures, party and interest groups' roles, constituency influence, and representation theory. (3-0-3)

POLS 4470. American Presidency. Powers, duties, and responsibilities are surveyed.  Students will carefully examine historic and contemporary conceptions of the office and  the presidency as an administrative institution. (3-0-3)

POLS 4570. Constitutional Law I:  The Structure and Powers of American Govt. This course focuses on the development of the separation of powers, federalism, and national and state regulatory authority as defined in the Constitution and as elaborated through Supreme Court decisions. Prior credit in American Government is recommended. (3-0-3)

POLS 4580. Constitutional Law II: Civil Liberties. This course is focused on civil liberties and civil rights as given in the Constitution, especially the Bill of Rights and the Civil War Amendments, and as reflected in Supreme Court decisions. Prior credit in American Government or its equivalent is recommended. Constitutional Law I is not a prerequisite for this course. (3-0-3)

POLS 4630. International Relations. The focus of this course is the theory and practices of international relations. (3-0-3).

POLS 4690. American Foreign Policy. This course surveys U.S. foreign policy from the 18th to the 21st centuries with emphasis on the role of the international system in shaping American policies and interests. (3-0-3)

POLS 4700. Political Philosophy. In this course students examine the development of political philosophy and the perennial issues with which it is concerned through the works of such thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Marx. (3-0-3)

POLS 4730. Religion and Politics. This course surveys the interaction of religion in U.S. politics and political behavior from the early colonial period through the contemporary political scene. (3-0-3)

POLS 4760. American Political Thought. This course entails an examination of the basic ideas about man and government that have formed the basis for political practice and debate within the United States. Schools and trends of thought from the colonial era to contemporary times will be explored. (3-0-3)

POLS 4900. Special Topics in Political Science. A variable credit course on selected issues, problems, and literature in political science. A student must get the permission of department Chair. (3-0-3)

POLS 4920. Political Science Internship. Internships with government agencies are available for qualified students. See the Coordinator of Intern Programs for information. (3-0-3)

POLS 4950. Senior Research. Required of all political science majors, this capstone research course requires students to integrate the basic concepts, methods, and sub-fields of political science, and to relate these to the contemporary world. It further develops skills in research and communications. A student must have earned a grade of C or better in at least 15 hours of upper division political science. (3-0-3)