Undergradute Course Descriptions

UNDERGRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

The descriptions of the courses offered by each school and department follow the information section and listing of degree programs for each school and department. Numbers following the description of the course indicate the number of weekly class hours, the number of weekly laboratory or practicum hours, and the credit-hour value of the course expressed in semester hours. For example, (3-2-3) following the course description means three class hours, two laboratory or practicum hours, and three semester hours of credit.

A | B | C | E | F | G | H | I | L | M | N | P | R | S | T | U | W

Academic Assistance Math

ACAM 0999. Intermediate Algebra. A program of study to prepare students for MATH 1111. Enrollment is determined by the score on the Department of Mathematics placement test or by self-identifying. Course content includes selected intermediate algebra topics. Institutional credit only. (3-0-3)

Accounting

ACCT 2101. Accounting Principles I. A study of the underlying theory and application of financial accounting concepts. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1111H Minimum Grade: C or MTH 110 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( MTH 108 Minimum Grade: C and MTH 109 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C or MTH 113 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1113H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ACCT 2102. Accounting Principles II. A study of the underlying theory and application of managerial accounting concepts. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ACCT 2101 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 205 Minimum Grade: C 

ACCT 3250. Intermediate Accounting I. Accounting theory and practice related to preparation and presentation of corporate financial statements in accordance with GAAP. Emphasis on acquisition of assets and services. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ACCT 2101 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 205 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 206 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( ACT 327 Minimum Grade: C ) 

ACCT 3260. Intermediate Accounting II. Continuation of ACCT 3250 with emphasis on fixed assets, liabilities, stockholders' equity, and investments. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ACCT 3250 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 310 Minimum Grade: C 

ACCT 3270. Intermediate Accounting III. Continuation of ACCT 3260 with emphasis on special issues related to income measurement, asset and liability valuation and recent developments in the accounting profession. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ACCT 3250 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 310 Minimum Grade: C 

ACCT 3280. Cost Accounting. The basic theory and practice related to determination of cost of products and services provided by a business and providing accounting information to management. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 327 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 206 Minimum Grade: C 

ACCT 4210. Accounting Systems. Covers the theory and design of automated procedures of accumulation and reporting information with special emphasis on internal control. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 327 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 206 Minimum Grade: C 

ACCT 4230. Income Tax Accounting. An introduction to the income tax laws with emphasis on taxation of individuals. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 327 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 206 Minimum Grade: C 

ACCT 4235. Advanced Income Tax Accounting. A continuation of ACCT 4230 with emphasis on taxation of business organizations, particularly corporations and partnerships. Prerequisites: ACCT 4230 Minimum Grade: C 

ACCT 4240. Not-for-Profit Accounting. Accounting theory and practice related to non-business organizations; governments and other non-profit organizations. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ACCT 3260 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 311 Minimum Grade: C or ACCT 3270 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 312 Minimum Grade: C 

ACCT 4280. Contemp Issues in Accounting. Study of accounting history, accounting theory, accounting institutions and contemporary issues in accounting. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ACCT 3260 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 311 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( ACCT 3270 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 312 Minimum Grade: C ) 

ACCT 4290. Internal Controls and Auditing. A study of systems of internal accounting control in organizations, their design and evaluation; and an introduction to the basic principles and techniques of auditing. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ACCT 3260 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 311 Minimum Grade: C or ACCT 3270 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 312 Minimum Grade: C 

ACCT 4390. Accounting Internship. Professional accounting experience obtained by employment with a public accounting firm, a business, or other organization while under the supervision of a partner, manager, or other office of the sponsoring organization. Permission of the Dean required. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ACCT 3250 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 310 Minimum Grade: C or ACCT 5250 Minimum Grade: C ) 

Academic Skills

ACSK 1100. Academic Skills. An academic assistance course designed to help students develop and strengthen essential study skills necessary for college survival. (3-0-3)

Anthropology

ANTH 1102. Introduction to Anthropology. A survey of physical and cultural anthropology covering primate evolution, hominid origins, and an analysis of past and present cultures. (3-0-3)

ANTH 1102H. Intro to Anthropology-Honors. A survey of physical and cultural anthropology covering primate evolution, hominid origins, and an analysis of past and present cultures. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

ANTH 1150. World Religions. A critical examination of major world religions. Topics include indigenous religions of Africa and North America, Hinduism, Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shintoism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Emphasis will be on understanding religions in cultural and historical context. (3-0-3)

ANTH 3350. Cultural Anthropology. A study of the nature, functions, and manifestations of culture in diverse human societies. Emphasis on selected cross-cultural case studies. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ANTH 1102H Minimum Grade: C or ANT 102 Minimum Grade: C or ANTH 1102 Minimum Grade: C 

ANTH 3353. Sex-Gender. An ethnographic survey of the concepts of sex and gender as they are applied cross-culturally. Current theoretical perspectives and the significance of biological, cultural, symbolic factors in determining gender roles will be emphasized. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ANTH 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ANT 102 Minimum Grade: C or ANTH 1102H Minimum Grade: C 

ANTH 4401. American Indian. A survey course on the cultural characteristics of native peoples of the Americas. Emphasis is placed upon the North American Indians. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ANTH 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ANT 201 Minimum Grade: C or ANTH 1102H Minimum Grade: C 

ANTH 4401H. American Indian-Hnr. A survey course on the cultural characteristics of native peoples of the Americas. Emphasis is placed upon the North American Indians. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ANTH 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ANTH 1102H Minimum Grade: C or ANT 201 Minimum Grade: C 

ANTH 449A. Special Topics In Anthropology. A course on selected issues, problems, and literature in anthropology. (3-0-3)

Art History

ARHS 3080. Asian Art History. The purpose of this course is to provide a basic foundation in Asian art, religion and culture. The course will emphasize the art produced in China, Japan, and Korea. (3-0-3)

ARHS 3085. Survey of Non-Western Art Hist. This course is an introduction to the Art of Africa, Oceania and the Americas. This illustrated lecture course will place art and art making practices within the context of the beliefs and social practices of these regions. (3-0-3)

ARHS 3090. Pre-Columbian-Mex-Meso Art. The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation of Pre-Columbia Art, indigenous religions, cultures, Hieroglyphic writing and mathematics. Course covers prehistoric 5,000 BC to the conquest. (3-0-3)

ARHS 3090H. Pre-Columbian-Meso Art- Hnr. The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation of Pre-Columbian art, indigenous religions, cultures, hieroglyphic writing, and mathematics. Course covers prehistoric 5,000 BC to the conquest. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

ARHS 4001. History of Modern Art. This illustrated lecture course will cover the history of European and American art through the development of Modernism (1848-1950). (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ARTF 2072 Minimum Grade: C 

ARHS 4001H. Honors History of Modern Art. This illustrated lecture course will cover the history of European and American art through the development of Modernism (1848-1950). This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ARTF 2072 Minimum Grade: C 

ARHS 4012. History of Contemporary Art. This illustrated lecture course will cover the history of contemporary European and American art (1950-present). (3-0-3)

ARHS 4012H. Contemporary Art Honors. A history of 20th-century European and American art. See ARHS 4012. This section is for students participating in the GSW honors program. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ARHS 2072 

ARHS 4090. Directed Study. This courses is an independent study Art History, Art Criticism, or Philosophies of art. Must have permission of supervising instructor. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARHS 4090H. Directed Study- Hnr. Independent study in art history or art criticism. May be repeated twice. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

Art Studio

ARST 3001. Beg Glass Blowing I. This course introduces students to basic skills, techniques and processes of glass as a transparent to semi-opaque, fluid, hot, expressive medium. Open to majors and non-art majors. The course may be taken as an elective by non-art majors. ARTF 1030-3D Design/Tools is suggested. (3-0-3)

ARST 3012. Intermediate Glass Blowing II. This course is an intermediate study of traditional and experimental skills, techniques, and concepts in hot glass designed to the needs of individual students. (1-5-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3001 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 3012H. Inter Glass Blowing II-HNRS. This course is an intermediate study of traditional and experimental skills, techniques, and concepts in hot glass designed to the needs of individual students. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (1-5-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3001 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 3021. Adv Drawing I. This course emphasizes for advanced drawing students individualized concept development through the use of traditional and experimental drawing methods and materials. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ARTF 1010 Minimum Grade: C and ARTF 1011 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 3031. Beg Printmaking I. This course is primarily concerned with aiding students in making art products by existing reproductive processes. It will: (a) demonstrate and introduce the methods of printing, students, (b) offer students the opportunity to practice the methods of printing, (c) assist the students in evaluating their performance as regards process and product. (1-5-3)

ARST 3042. Intermediate Printmaking II. These courses are primarily concerned with advancing the student's mastery of printmaking and establishing a personal style in the production of the making of prints. All courses are designed for the individual student and his/her interest in printmaking. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3031 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 3071. Beg Sculpture I. This course will expose the student to a wide variety of sculptural concepts and teach analysis and solution to sculptural problems. (1-5-3) Prerequisites: ARTF 1030 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 3081. Beg Photography I. This course covers basic black and white photography. It is for the student who has never been exposed to photography. The student must have a functional 35 mm camera with manual controls of the aperture shutter to be able to control camera. (1-5-3)

ARST 3081H. Beg Photography I-Hnr. This course covers basic black and white photography. It is for the student who has never been exposed to photography The student must have a functional 35 mm camera with manual controls of the aperturn shutter to be able to control camera. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (1-5-3)

ARST 3082. Intermediate Sculpture II. A second studio course in sculture. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3071 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 3092. Intermediate Photo II. This course is designed to provide the photography student a chance to explore black and white photography beyond the basic and into the intermediate level, that is, exploration and instruction into more advanced principles of photography and "good picture taking" (effective communication). (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3081 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 3141. Ceramics I Beginning. The course is designed to teach basic techniques for the studio artist and school teacher in the areas of hand- building and wheel-throwing shape with clay. The course may be used as an elective by non-art majors. (1-5-3)

ARST 3141H. Ceramics I Beginning - Honors.

ARST 3152. Ceramics II, Intermediate. This course is intermediate study in ceramic design and technology, throwing and/or hand building, concentrated study in controlling clay, and glaze behavior. (0-3-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3141 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 3170. Beginning Digital Media 1. Beginning Digital Media 1 introduces students to the use of digital technology in art practice. The basics of digital imaging and processing for print and web media are explored. Students learn the fundamentals of working with raster and vector-based software, color management, correction, resolution, scanning, printing, tools and tech- niques for designing, compositing and drawing/painting digitally. Students are then introduced to web authoring software and learning the basics of applying text, graphics, and simple animation for these applications. The final project is a web gallery they creat to display their work for the course. (1-5-3) Prerequisites: ARTF 1020 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 3241. Beg Painting I. An introduction to painting. (1-5-3) Prerequisites: ARTF 1010 Minimum Grade: C or ARTF 1011 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 3252. Intermediate Painting II. It is the purpose of these advanced courses to provide the advanced student of painting with instruction and time to develop personal conceptual direction using painting and multimedia techniques. Two main emphasis will be stressed: A) Further experimentation with oils as well as possible introduction to acrylics; experimentation with combining painting, drawing, collage, etc.; and methods and materials to enhance individual ideas and communicative impact. B) Development of personal concept. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3241 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4003. Photo Communications III. This course is for people who have mastered the basic dark- room techniques. It is designed to introduce the student to new photographic techniques and to stimulate their creativity in the darkroom. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3092 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4004. Adv Sculpture IV. Glass blowing, ceramics and sculpture are basically all sculpture courses, only specializing in a particular mater- ial; therefore any course beyond the first course must be designed for each individual student. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 4093 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4010A. Senior Exhibition - Thesis.

ARST 4014. Photographic Illustration IV. This course is for people who have mastered the basic dark- room techniques in black & white and color. It is designed to introduce the student to new photographic techniques and to stimulate their creativity in the darkroom. ((0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 4003 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4020. Seminar Study.

ARST 4023. Adv Glass Blowing III. Glass Blowing and ceramics are basically sculpture courses, only specializing in a particular material; therefore any course beyond the first course must be designed for the individual student. In the area of three-dimensional art every technique will tend to generate shapes of a particular kind, which in turn will tend to fit particular concepts. Therefore when designing a course for a student, the important thing is to establish a balance between time spent working on pure technique and time spent working on concepts as it may relate to technique. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3012 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4023H. Adv Glass Blowing III.

ARST 4025. Photography V. The course is designed to allow the advanced photography student to use all their knowledge experience to create a portfolio of quality photographs which will enable them to present a senior exhibition of photography and have their portfolio ready to present to prospective employers for employment or graduate school. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 4014 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4032. Adv Drawing II. Prerequisites: ARST 2032 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4034. Adv Glass Blowing IV. Glass Blowing and ceramics are basically sculpture courses, only specializing material; therefore any course beyond the first course must be designed for the individual student. In the area of three-dimensional art every technique will tend to generate shapes of a particular kind, which in turn will tend to fit particular concepts. Therefore when designing course for a student, the important thing is to establish a balance between time spent working on pure technique and time spent working on concept as it may relate to technique. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 4023 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4053. Adv Printmaking III. Prerequisites: ARST 3042 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4064. Adv Printmaking IV. These courses are primarily concerned with advancing the student's mastery of printmaking and establishing a personal style in the production of making prints. All courses are designed for the individual student and his/her interest in printmaking. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 4053 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4093. Adv Sculpture III. Glass blowing, ceramics and sculpture are basically all sculpture courses, only specializing in a particular mater- ial; therefore any course beyond the first course must be designed for each individual student. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3082 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4163. Ceramics III, Advanced. This course is advanced study in ceramic design and techno- logy, throwing and/or hand building, concentrated study in controlling clay, and glaze behavior. (0-3-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3152 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4170. Intermediate Digital Media 2. Students are introduced to animation and digital video as an art medium. Ths course surveys a historical range of approached from documentary and fundamentals of timing, movement, the relationship between sound and image and digital video imaging and editing. Student final projects intregrate all course components. (1-5-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3170 Minimum Grade: C and ARTF 1020 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4171. Advanced Digital Media 3. This course examines current internet art practice in light of new media critical theory. Students use a variety of 2D computer software programs to create a seriew of short, interactive web art pieces while working on a prototype for a more complex and conceptually engaging final piece to be published to the internet. (1-5-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3170 Minimum Grade: C and ARTF 1020 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4172. Advanced Digital Media 4. Media 4 brings together all of the skills and knowledge acquired by the student to this point. Students undergo a more rigorous study of new media history/theory and work to integrate any or all of the 2D computer software tools available towards a final exhibition incorporating video installation, digital photography, graphics, web art, sound art, etc. (1-5-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3170 Minimum Grade: C and ARST 4170 Minimum Grade: C and ARST 4171 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4174. Ceramics IV, Advanced. The course is advanced study in ceramic design and techno- logy, throwing and/or hand building, concentrated study in controlling clay, and glaze behavior. (0-3-3) Prerequisites: ARST 4163 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4263. Adv Painting III. It is the purpose of these advanced courses to provide the advanced student of painting with instruction and time to develop personal conceptual direction using painting and multimedia techniques. Two main emphasis will be stressed: A) Further experimentation with oils as well as possible introduction to acrylics; experimentation with combining painting, drawing, collage, etc.; and methods and materials to enhance individual ideas and communicative impact. B) Development of personal concept. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3252 Minimum Grade: C 

ARST 4274. Adv Painting IV. It is the purpose of these advanced student of painting with instruction and time to develop personal conceptual direction using painting and multimedia techniques. Two main emphases will be stressed: A) Further experimentation with oils as well as possible introduction to acrylics; experimentation with combining painting, drawing, collage, etc.; and methods and materials to enhance individual ideas and communicative impact. B) Development of personal con- cept. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 4263 Minimum Grade: C 

Art Appreciation

ARTC 1100. Art Appreciation. This illustrated lecture course deals with ideas and images that introduce basic art theory, art practice, and art history. The student will explore the concept "art"; media and methods used by artists; and analyze compositional elements and design principles employed by artists in the creation of their work. (3-0-3)

ARTC 1100H. Art Apprec-Hnr. See course description for ARTC 1100. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

Art Area F

ARTF 1010. Beg Drawing I. This course provides the beginning student with instruction in basic skills, techniques, materials necessary for a fundamental experience in beginning drawing, and initiates the construction of imaginative conceptual exploration at the introductory level. (0-6-3)

ARTF 1011. Beg Drawing II-Figure. This course provides the beginning student with instruction in basic skills, techniques, materials necessary for a fundamental experience in beginning figure drawing, and also initiates construction of imaginative conceptual exploration at the introductory level. (0-6-3)

ARTF 1020. 2D Design Concepts and Color. This course explores the fundamentals of design and color theory, ideas, and concepts as they relate to the producing of art. (0-6-3)

ARTF 1020H. 2D Design Color-Concepts-Hnr. This course explores the fundamentals of design and color theory, ideas, and concepts as they relate to the producing of art. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (0-6-3)

ARTF 1030. Three Dimen Design and Tools. An introduction to the basic principles of three-dimensional design as they apply to functional and non-functional art forms. This course provides the student with practical knowledge of hand tools, power tools, and welding equipment. (0-6-3)

ARTF 2061. Art History Survey I. This illustrated lecture course deals with ideas and images that introduce art theory, art practice and art history. The student will explore the concept "art"; media and methods used by artists; how to analyze a work of art. The course will cover material from the first half of the history of Western art. (3-0-3)

ARTF 2072. Art History Survey II. This illustrated lecture course deals with ideas and images that introduce art theory, art practice, and art history. The student will explore the concept "art"; media and methods used by artists; how to analyze a work of art. The course will cover material from the second half of Western art through the 20th century. (3-0-3)

ARTF 2072H. Art History Survey II-Hnr. See the course description for ARTF 2072. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

Art Seminar Study

ARTS 3102. Ethics of Intl Photography. This course is an introductory study of ethical issues regarding photography (both digital and film). It is a studio course with no prerequisites that can be taken as an elective. Students will be instructed on basic photography and digital editing techniques producing a photographic series in collaboration with students indigenous to the country. (1-5-3)

ARTS 4010. Senior Exhibition. Preparation of a senior exhibit and the writing of a senior thesis. (0-2-1)

Art: Directed Study. These courses are open only to students pursuing a major or minor in art. Students may enroll for either 2 or 3 semester hours. Each course may be repeated twice.

ARTX 3020. Jewelry and Metals. (1-5-3)

ARTX 4055. Directed Study - Digital Media. This is a directed study program of student designed by instructor and student to address the needs of the student's current art practice in the program. The course involves intensive research and a high volume of work from the student. Any or all of the 2D computer software tools available are used towards a final body of work/exhibit. (0-6-2) Prerequisites: ARTF 1020 Minimum Grade: C and ARST 3170 Minimum Grade: C and ARST 4170 Minimum Grade: C and ARST 4171 Minimum Grade: C and ARST 4172 Minimum Grade: C 

ARTX 4060. Senior Seminar. (2-0-2)

ARTX 4065. Directed Study - Digital Media. A directed program of study designed by instructor and student, adresses the needs of the individual students current art practice in the program. The course involves intensive research and a high volume of work from the student. Any or all of the 2D computer software tools available are used towars a final body of work/exhibit. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARTF 1020 Minimum Grade: C and ARST 4170 Minimum Grade: C and ARST 4171 Minimum Grade: C and ARST 4172 Minimum Grade: C 

ARTX 4071. Drawing and Painting. These courses are independent study courses in studio art disciplines. It implies a degree of maturity, self- reliance, imagination, and technical competence for the student to complete his/her study. (0-4-2) Prerequisites: ARST 3241 Minimum Grade: C 

ARTX 4072. Ceramics. (0-4-2) Prerequisites: ARST 3141 Minimum Grade: C 

ARTX 4073. Glassblowing. (0-4-2) Prerequisites: ARST 3001 Minimum Grade: C 

ARTX 4074. Sculpture. (0-4-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3071 Minimum Grade: C 

ARTX 4075. Printmaking. (0-4-2) Prerequisites: ARST 3031 Minimum Grade: C 

ARTX 4076. Photography. (0-4-2) Prerequisites: ARST 3092 Minimum Grade: C and ARST 3081 Minimum Grade: C 

ARTX 4081. Drawing and Painting. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3241 Minimum Grade: C 

ARTX 4082. Ceramics. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3141 Minimum Grade: C 

ARTX 4083. Glassblowing. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3001 Minimum Grade: C 

ARTX 4084. Sculpture. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3071 Minimum Grade: C 

ARTX 4085. Printmaking. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3031 Minimum Grade: C 

ARTX 4086. Photography. (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ARST 3092 Minimum Grade: C and ARST 3081 Minimum Grade: C 

Biology

BIOL 1000. Essentials of Biology Lab. An introduction to the principles of modern biology through experiment and demonstration. One lab per week. Requires simultaneous enrollment in (or previous successful completion of) BIOL 1001, Essentials of Biology, to satisfy the core Area D laboratory science option. (0-1-1)

BIOL 1001. Essentials of Biology. A survey of the principles of modern biology including cell structure, respiration and photosynthesis, gene structure and function, genetics, evolution, the diversity of living things, plant and animal systems, and ecology. Three lectures per week. Satisfies the core Area D non-laboratory science option unless taken concurrently with BIOL 1000. (3-0-3)

BIOL 1107. Essentials of Biology I. Essentials of Biology. A two semester sequence which provides a survey of the principles of modern biology including cell structure and function, respiration and photosynthesis, gene structure and function, genetics, evolution, diversity of living things, plant and animal systems, and ecology. The course satisfies Core Area D non-laboratory science option only, unless taken concurrently with BIOL 1107L, Essentials of Biology Laboratory. Taught Fall Semester and Spring Semester. (3-0-3)

BIOL 1107H. Honors Essentials of Biology. A survey of the principles of modern biology including cell structure and function,respiration and photosynthesis, gene structure and function, genetics, evolution, diversity of living things, plant and animal systems, and ecology. This is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

BIOL 1107L. Essentials of Biology I Lab. An introduction to the principles of biology through experiment and demonstration. Requires simultaneous enrollment in (or previous successful completion of) BIOL 1107 to satisfy Core Area D laboratory science option. (0-2-1)

BIOL 1108. Essentials of Biology II. The second in a two semester sequence which provides a survey of the principles of modern biology including cell structure and function, respiration and photosynthesis, gene structure and function, genetics, evolution, diversity of living things, plant and animal systems, and ecology. The courses satisfy Core Area D non-laboratory science option only, unless taken concurrently with BIOL 1108L, Essentials of Biology Laboratory. Taught Fall Semester and Spring Semester. (3-0-3)

BIOL 1108H. Essentials for BiologyII-Honor. The second in a two semester sequence which provides a survey of the principles of modern biology including cell structure and function, respiration and photosynthesis, gene structure and function, genetics, evolution, diversity of living things, plant and animal systems, and ecology. The courses satisfy Core Area D non-laboratory science option only, unless taken concurrently with BIOL 1108L, Essentials of Biology Laboratory. Taught Fall Semester and Spring Semester. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

BIOL 1108L. Essentials of Biology II Lab. An introduction to the principles of biology through experiment and demonstration. Requires simultaneous enrollment in (or previous successful completion of) BIOL 1107 and BIOL 1108 to satisfy Core Area D laboratory science option. (0-2-1)

BIOL 1500. Applied Botany. This course is designed to provide the non-biology major with an introduction to vascular plant anatomy and basic life processes and with plants of the world that have horticultural interest. The emphasis is on the "why" of gardening techniques rather than "how-to", but the student should acquire much practical information. Two lectures and one demonstration per week. BIOL 1107 or permission of instructor are required. Taught Spring Semester. (3-0-3)

BIOL 1500H. Applied Botany-Hnr. This course is designed to provide the non-biology major with an introduction to vascular plant anatomy and basic life processes and with plants of the world that have horticultural interest. The emphasis is on the "why" of gardening techniques rather than "how-to", but the student should acquire much practical information. Two lectures and one demonstration per week. BIOL 1107 or permission of instructor are required. Taught Spring Semester. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

BIOL 2030. Human Anatomy-Physiology I. A study of the basic components of human anatomy and physiology approached from molecular, cellular, tissue, and system levels. Systems covered in this course include the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. (3-2-4)

BIOL 2040. Human Anatomy-Physiology II. A study of the basic components of human anatomy and physiology approached from a molecular, cellular, organ, and system levels. Systems covered in this course include the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive systems. (3-2-4)

BIOL 2050. Microbiology. A study of elements of microbiology, giving a general knowledge of microorganisms as related to the problems of nursing and health. (3-2-4)

BIOL 2107. Principles of Biology I. A two semester sequence designed to give pre-health professional students and biology majors the basic fundamentals of biological sciences. (3-3-4)

BIOL 2107H. Principles of Biology I-Honors. A two semester sequence designed to give pre-health professional students and biology majors the basic fundamentals of biological sciences. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Progam. (3-3-4)

BIOL 2108. Principles of Biology II. A two semester sequence designed to give pre-health professional students and biology majors the basic fundamentals of biological sciences. (3-3-4) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C or BIO 220 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2107H Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 2108H. Principles of Biology II-Honor. A two semester sequence designed to give pre-health professional students and biology majors the basic fundamentals of biological sciences. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-3-4) Prerequisites: BIOL 2107H Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2107 Minimum Grade: C 

BIOL 3000. Adv Botany. An introduction to the anatomy and morphology of organisms traditionally considered plants with an emphasis on how anatomy and morphology reflect the phylogenetic relationships within the Kingdoms Monera, Plantae, and Fungi. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 3000H. Honors Adv Botany. Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 3020. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. A comparative study of the selected systems and body regions of representative vertebrates to provide foundational material in anatomy, evolution, and development. Laboratory emphasis is on the gross anatomy of Necturus, Squalus, and Felis domesticus. (2-4-4) Prerequisites: BIOL 2108 or BIO 222 or BIOL 2108H 

BIOL 3050. Developmental Biology. Early embryological development of vertebrates and some invertebrates, including a study of germ cells, fertilization, cleavage, differentiation, and the origin of organ systems. Emphasis is on molecular mechanisms controlling key developmental processes. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 3050H. Developmental Biology-Honors. Early embryological development of vertebrates and some invertebrates, including a study of germ cells, fertilization, cleavage, differentiation, and the origin of organ systems. Emphasis is on molecular mechanisms controlling key developmental processes. This is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C 

BIOL 3100. Cell-Molecular Biology. A study of the structure and function of cells. General topics include ultrastructure, metabolism, cell cycle, and cell-cell interactions. Throughout the course, special emphasis is placed on current related trends in molecular biology. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212H Minimum Grade: C or CHM 204 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 3301 Minimum Grade: C or CHM 301 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 3100H. Cell-Molecular Bio-Honors. A study of the structure and function of cells. General topics include ultrastructure, metabolism, cell cycle, and cell-cell interactions. Throughout the course, special emphasis is placed on current related trends in molecular biology. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honor Program. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 3301 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 3301H Minimum Grade: C or CHM 301 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 3300. Economic Botany. An introduction to the uses of plants and plant products by human beings from prehistory to genetically engineered crops and bioremediation of toxic wastes. Demonstrations provide hands-on experience with topics including plant gums and resins, essential oils, fibers, dyes, spices, and staple plant foods from around the world. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 3300H. Economic Botany - HONORS. An introduction to the uses of plants and plant products by human beings from prehistory to genetically engineered crops and bioremediation of toxic wastes. Demonstrations provide hands-on experience with topics including plant gums and resins, essential oils, fibers, dyes, spices, and staple plant foods from around the world. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C 

BIOL 3400. Bacteriology. A general study of bacteria with an introduction to some fundamental concepts and techniques. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: CHEM 3302H or CHEM 3302 

BIOL 3410. Adv Bacteriology. A further study of basic principles of bacteriology with emphasis on applied bacteriology including environmental, industrial, and medical bacteriology plus principles of immunology. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 3400 Minimum Grade: C or BIO 340 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 3600. Entomology. A study of morphology, physiology, and the natural history of the common insects plus techniques of collecting, identifying, and preserving insects. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: BIOL 2108 or BIOL 2108H or BIO 222 

BIOL 3710. Field Botany. An introduction to the local flora, particularly of conifers and of flowering plants, with an emphasis on field recognition and the use of keys. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 3710H. Field Botany-Honors. An introduction to the local flora, particularly of conifers and of flowering plants, with an emphasis on field recognition and the use of keys. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C 

BIOL 4010A. Biology Seminar I. A course in which the student will propose, develop, and complete a hands-on research project under the supervision of a faculty member within the Department. The culmination of the semester will be the submission of a research paper, suitable for submission for publication. Taught Fall Semester each year. (0-2-1)

BIOL 4010B. Biology Seminar II. Course which is a continuation of BIOL 4010A. Each student will prepare a summary of, and make an oral presentation on, the research project undertaken in BIOL 4010A. Course is used in Departmental assessment and includes an exit exam and an exit interview. Taught Spring Semester each year; taken senior year. (0-2-1)

BIOL 4050. Ecology. An introduction to the study of ecological principles, including population, community, and ecosystem ecology and conservation biology. (3-3-4) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212H Minimum Grade: C or CHM 204 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 4050H. Ecology-Honors. An introduction to the study of ecological principles, including population, community, and ecosystem ecology and conservation biology. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-3-4) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212H Minimum Grade: C or CHM 204 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 4100. Biological Resources. This course is designed to provide upper division students with the computer and research skills necessary to excel professionally in biology and related fields. Topics to be covered include: conducting a productive search of scientific literature, reading and evaluating primary sources, collection and analysis of scientific data, production of professional quality presentations and publication quality tables, graphs, and images. (3-0-3)

BIOL 4200. Genetics. A study of modern genetics including Mendelian, molecular, and population genetic principles. Drosophila genetics will constitute a major portion of lab. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: BIOL 2108 or BIOL 2108H or BIO 222 

BIOL 4200H. Genetics-Honors. A study of modern genetics including Mendelian, molecular, and population genetic principles. Drosophila genetics will constitute a major portion of lab. This section is for students in the GSW Honors Program. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C 

BIOL 4300. Plant Physiology. An introduction to the life processes of plants with an emphasis on angiosperms. Topics include water relations, mineral nutrition, control of growth and development, and the biochemistry of photosynthesis with a brief consideration of plant "secondary" metabolism (production of alkaloids, aromataic oils, gums, resins, etc.). (2-4-4) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 3302 Minimum Grade: C or CHM 302 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 4350. Natural History of Vetebrates. The classification and natural history of the vertebrates with an emphasis placed on native species. Laboratories involve the identification of native fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and mammals. A representative collection of vertebrates is required. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 4400. Animal Physiology. A study of the cellular and systemic functions of animals, with emphasis on the mammal. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: ( CHEM 3301 Minimum Grade: C or CHM 301 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 4400H. Animal Physiology-Hnr. A study of the cellular and systemic functions of animals, with emphasis on the mammal. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 3301 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 3301H Minimum Grade: C or CHM 301 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 4500. Aquatic Biology. A laboratory and field course emphasizing the habits and organisms of aquatic environments. Special consideration given to local freshwater invertebrates. Consideration also given to human impact on aquatic systems. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 or BIOL 2108H or BIO 222 ) 

BIOL 4500H. Aquatic Biology-Hnr. Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212H Minimum Grade: C or CHM 301 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 4750. Special Problems. Directed study course designed to provide the advanced student with an opportunity to make an independent investigation in an area of special interest. (2-0-2)

BIOL 4760. Special Problems. Directed study course designed to provide the advanced student with an opportunity to make an independent investigation in an area of special interest. (2-0-2)

BIOL 4800. Herpetology. The study of the classification, distribution and life histories of reptiles and amphibians, primarily those of North America. Laboratory and field work involve practice in classification, techniques of collection and preservation of museum specimens, and the study of local forms in their natural habitats. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BIOL 4800H. Herpetology - Honors.

BIOL 4900. Special Topics. (1-0-1) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2108 Minimum Grade: C or BIOL 2108H Minimum Grade: C or BIO 222 Minimum Grade: C ) 

Business Administration

BUSA 1405. Business Leadership I. This course is designed for students participating in Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE). The course intends to develop leadership skills for students entering Georgia Southwestern State University as Freshmen. These students will be able to work with juniors, seniors, and graduate students on outreach projects developed by the Students in Free Enterprise. (1-0-1)

BUSA 2001. Business Leadership III. The course intends to develop leadership skills for sophomore students. These students will be able to work with juniors, seniors, and graduate students on outreach projects developed by the Students in Free Enterprise. (1-0-1)

BUSA 2010. Microcomputer App in Business. This course is designed to provide an introduction to the use of microcomputer applications in business. The course will emphasize the use of the spreadsheet and the database and the integration of these in case applications of analysis for business decisions. (3-0-3)

BUSA 2050. Internet-E-Commerce Concepts. This course is designed to provide understanding of the evolving Interne technologies and to explore the business implications of these technologies. (3-0-3)

BUSA 2105. Communicating in the Bus Envir. Theory and practice in the use of correct, forceful English in the composition of business letters, reports, and other written communication found in the business world. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 1102H Minimum Grade: C 

BUSA 3050. Business Statistics. Designed to provide the student with the ability to understand the basic tasks of statistics and to develop a working knowledge of the concepts and principles of the basic practice of statistics. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: C or MTH 110 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( MTH 108 Minimum Grade: C and MTH 109 Minimum Grade: C ) or MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1101 or MATH 1120 

BUSA 3060. Quantitative Management. A second course in statistics, including analysis of variance, regression analysis, nonparametric statistical tests, chi square, time series analysis, decision theory, linear programming, and inventory models. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: BUSA 3050 Minimum Grade: C or MTH 204 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 2204 Minimum Grade: C 

BUSA 3090. Business Law. A study of contracts, negotiable instruments, bailments, common and public carriers, agencies, sales contracts, and uniform sales laws as they apply to business. (3-0-3)

BUSA 3106. Legal Environment of Business. This course provides the business student with a study of the interrelationship of law and regulation in business.the course also covers government regulation of business activities and the legal environment within which business must operate. (3-0-3)

BUSA 3150. Business Finance. An introduction to promotion and organization of the corporation, forms of securities issued, problems of financial administration, expansion, securing funds, reorganization, and liquidation. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ACCT 2101 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 205 Minimum Grade: C or ACCT 2101H Minimum Grade: C 

BUSA 3900. Prior Learning Portfolio. This course is designed to evaluate knowledge that a student has gained through work, life, and learning experiences. A prior learning portfolio, a written record presented by the students documenting prior learning experiences, is used to assess prior learning. (0-V-3)

BUSA 3901. Prior Learning Portfolio. This course is designed to evaluate knowledge that a student has gained through work, and learning experiences. A prior learning portfolio,a written record presented by the students documenting prior learning experiences, is used to assess prior learning. (0-V-6)

BUSA 3902. Prior Learning Portfolio. This course is designed to evaluate knowledge that a student has gained through work, life, and learning experiences. A prior learning portfolio, a written record presented by the students documenting prior learning experiences, is used to assess prior learning. (0-V-9)

BUSA 3903. Prior Learning Portfolio. This course is designed to evaluate knowledge that a student has gained through work, life, and learning experiences. A prior learning portfolio, a written record presented by the students documenting prior learning experiences, is used to assess prior learning. (0-V-12)

BUSA 3904. Prior Learning Portfolio. This course is designed to evaluate knowledge that a student has gained through work, life, and learning experiences. A prior learning protfolio, a written record presented by the students documenting prior learning expernences, is used to assess prior learning. (0-V-15)

BUSA 3905. Prior Learning Portfolio. This course is designed to evaluate knowledge that a student has gained through work, life, and learning experiences. A prior learning portfolio, a written record pesented by the students documenting prior learning experiences, is used to assess prior learning. (0-V-18)

BUSA 3906. Prior Learning Portfolio. This course is designed to evaluate knowledge that a student has gained through work, life, and learning experiences. A prior learning portfolio, a written record presented by the students documenting prior learning experiences, is used to assess prior learning. (0-V-21)

BUSA 4405. Free Enterprise in Practice I. This course is desigend for students participating in Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE). The course intends to devleope leadership, analytical, teamwork and communication skills through planning, implementation, and completion of entrepreneurship projects and services. This course may involve special case competition at national and regional levels. Prerequisite: Junior standing and GPA of at least 2.80. (V-V-3)

BUSA 4406. Free Enterprise in Practice II. A continuation of BUSA 4405, the course is designed to advance students' leadership and managerial skills through analysis and completion of projects, preparation of annual report and successful completionof Regional and National competition. (V-V-3) Prerequisites: ( BUSA 4405 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BUSA 4415. International Business Experie. A study of how business is conducted in foreign countries and how culture impacts business decisions. Emphasis will be placed on relations between the U.S. and a selected country, with an end-of-semester trip to visit businesses in the country studied. Minimum GPA of 3.5 required for this honors class. (V-V-3) Prerequisites: ( BUSA 4405 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BUSA 4440. Investments and Securities. A study of the principles of sound investments, including the different types of securities issued by business firms and governments, tangibles, and monetary funds. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( BUSA 3150 Minimum Grade: C or BUS 330 Minimum Grade: C ) 

BUSA 4910. Seminar International Issues. A seminar discussing and analyzing topics of current concern in the international environment, with particular emphasis on potential effects of business activity. (3-0-3)

BUSA 4970. Business Practicum. Practical experience gained by "employment" in the workplace and in the accomplishment of one or more special projects pertinent to the activities of the sponsoring agency or organization. (0-V-3)

Chemistry

CHEM 1020. Everyday Chemistry. This class is designed for non-science major students to help them overcome the lack of interest and the challenges that they may have in learning chemistry. The class intends to capture students' attention by allowing them to learn about topics concerning today's society such as emerging infectious diseases, crime scene investigation, the obesity epidemic, biotechnology, new materials, chemical weapons and nuclear energy. Learning about a variety of chemical applications based on fundamental chemical phenomena, the students will build confidence that they can be successful in chemistry. (3-0-3)

CHEM 1151. Survey of Chemistry I. The first course in a two-semester sequence covering elemental principles of general, organic, and biochemistry designed for allied health profession majors (Core Area D). Topics to be covered include measurement and mathematical concepts, atomic structure, chemical bonding and molecular structure, chemical equations, chemical reactions, solutions, acids and bases, nomenclature, and fundamentals of organic compounds. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 1111 Corequisite: CHEM 1151L. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MATH 1111 

CHEM 1151L. Survey of Chemistry I Lab. This laboratory course is designed to introduce the student to common laboratory techniques and equipment. The experiments are designed to reinforce topics that are covered in the CHEM 1151 lecture. Corequisite: CHEM 1151. (0-3-1)

CHEM 1152. Survey of Chemistry II. The second course in a two-semester sequence covering elemental principles of general, organic, and biochemistry designed for allied health profession majors. Topics to be covered include structural features of organic compounds, reactions of organic compounds and their relevance to living systems, classes of biomolecules, structural features of biomolecules, and metabolism. Prerequisite: MATH 1111 and CHEM 1151/CHEM1151L. Corequisite: CHEM 1152L. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MATH 1111 and CHEM 1151 and CHEM 1151L 

CHEM 1152L. Survey of Chemistry II Lab. This laboratory course for allied health profession majors (Core Area D) is designed to introduce the student to common laboratory techniques and equipment. The experiments are designed to reinforce topics that are covered in the CHEM 1152 lecture. Prerequisite: CHEM 1151L. Corequisite: CHEM 1152. (0-3-1) Prerequisites: CHEM 1151L and CHEM 1152 

CHEM 1211. Principles of Chemistry I. First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, chemical reactions, states of matter, thermochemistry, quantum theory, molecular geometry, and solutions. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1111H Minimum Grade: C ) or ( MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1113H Minimum Grade: C or MTH 113 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( MATH 1120 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1120H Minimum Grade: C ) or MATH 1501 Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 1211H. Principles of Chem I-Honors. First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, chemical reactions, states of matter, thermochemistry, quantum theory, molecular geometry, and solutions. Membership in Honors Program and consent of instructor required in addition to course prerequisites. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1111H Minimum Grade: C ) or ( MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1113H Minimum Grade: C or MTH 113 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( MATH 1120 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1120H Minimum Grade: C ) or MATH 1501 Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 1211L. Principles of Chemistry Lab I. Laboratory exercises that supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1211. (0-3-1) Prerequisites: CHEM 1211 

CHEM 1212. Principles of Chemistry II. Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CHEM 1211 or CHEM 1211H ) or ( CHM 203 and CHM 204 ) and ( MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1111H Minimum Grade: C ) or ( MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1113H Minimum Grade: C or MTH 113 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( MATH 1120 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1120H Minimum Grade: C ) or MATH 1501 Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 1212H. Prin of Chemistry II-Honors. Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CHEM 1211 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1211H Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1211K Minimum Grade: C ) or ( CHM 203 Minimum Grade: C and CHM 204 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1111H Minimum Grade: C ) or MATH 1111K Minimum Grade: C or ( MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1113H Minimum Grade: C or MTH 112 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( MATH 1120 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1120H Minimum Grade: C ) or MATH 1501 Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 1212L. Principles of Chemistry Lab II. Laboratory exercises that supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1212. (0-3-1) Prerequisites: CHEM 1211L or CHM 203 and CHEM 1212 

CHEM 3250. Quantitative Analysis. An introduction to quantitative analytical techniques with emphasis on the theory and practice of classic wet and instrumental methods that are in general use in both research and industry. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CHEM 1211 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1211L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1212L Minimum Grade: C ) 

CHEM 3250L. Quantitative Analysis Lab. An introduction to quantitative analytical techniques in the laboratory with emphasis on classic wet and instrumental methods that are in general use in both research and industry. (0-6-2) Prerequisites: ( CHEM 1211 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1211L Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 1212L Minimum Grade: C ) and CHEM 3250 

CHEM 3301. Organic Chemistry I. The first part of a two-semester sequence devoted to the study and preparation of carbon compounds. Part one includes the study of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatic compounds, stereochemistry, and mechanisms. CHEM 3301L to be taken concurrently. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212H Minimum Grade: C or CHM 204 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 3301L. Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. Laboratory linked to CHEM 3301. Study of the synthesis of organic compounds and their properties. CHEM 3301 to be taken concurrently. (0-3-1) Prerequisites: CHEM 1212L Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 3301 

CHEM 3302. Organic Chemistry II. The second part of a two-semester sequence devoted to the study and preparation of carbon compounds. Part two includes the study of more complex functional groups and difunctional compounds. CHEM 3302L to be taken concurrently. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CHEM 3301 Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 3302L. Qualitative Org Chem Lab II. The laboratory assignments will include the characterization and identification of unknown organic compounds. CHEM 3302 to be taken concurrently. (0-3-1) Prerequisites: CHEM 3301L and CHEM 3302 

CHEM 3310. Inorganic Chemistry. A systematic study of the atomic structure, bonding and periodic properties of the elements. CHEM 3310L to be taken concurrently. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CHEM 3301 Minimum Grade: C or CHM 301 Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 3310H. Inorganic Chemistry-Honors. A systematic study of the atomic structure, bonding, and periodic properties of the elements. CHEM 3310L to be taken concurrently. Minimum grade of C in Organic Chemistry I, membership in the Honors Program, and consent of instructor are required. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CHEM 3301 Minimum Grade: C or CHM 301 Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 3310L. Inorganic Chemistry Lab. A lab linked to CHEM 3310 including the synthesis and study of the properties of inorganic compounds. CHEM 3310 to be taken concurrently. (0-3-1) Prerequisites: CHEM 3301L Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 3320. Adv. Topics in Inorganic Chem.. A course designed to introduce areas of current research in inorganic chemistry. Topics to be covered, but are not limited to, include: organometallics, catalysis, solid-state chemistry, nanomaterials, and environmental inorganic chemistry. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CHEM 3310 Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 4350. Molecular Modeling. An introduction to the use of computers to produce realistic models of chemical compounds based on mathematical descriptions of the atoms and the forces between them. CHEM 4402 may be taken concurrently. Permission of instructor required in addition to course prerequisites. (2-0-2) Prerequisites: ( CHEM 3301 Minimum Grade: C or CHM 301 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 3302 Minimum Grade: C or CHM 302 Minimum Grade: C ) and CHEM 4402 Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 4401. Physical Chemistry I. A study of thermodynamics including equations of state; gas laws; first, second, and third laws of thermodynamics; reversible and irreversible systems; & energy relationships, kinetics, and electrochemistry. CHEM 4401L to be taken concurrently. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 2221 Minimum Grade: C or MTH 210 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( PHYS 2212 Minimum Grade: C or PHY 213 Minimum Grade: C or PHYS 1112 Minimum Grade: C or PHY 203 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( CHEM 1212 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212H Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 1212K Minimum Grade: C ) 

CHEM 4401H. Physical Chemistry I - Honors.

CHEM 4401L. Physical Chemistry Lab I. An introduction to the techniques and methods of Physical Chemistry. CHEM 4401 to be taken concurrently. (0-3-1) Prerequisites: CHEM 4401 

CHEM 4402. Physical Chemistry II. A study of quantum mechanics and an introduction to the theoretical basis of differential spectroscopy methods. CHEM 4402L to be taken concurrently. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CHEM 4401 Minimum Grade: C or CHM 400 Minimum Grade: C ) 

CHEM 4402H. Physical Chemistry II-Honors. A study of quantum mechanics and an introduction to the theoretical basis of differential spectroscopy methods. CHEM 4402L to be taken concurrently. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CHEM 4401 Minimum Grade: C or CHM 400 Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 4402L. Physical Chemistry Lab II. A continuation of the study of the techniques and methods of Physical Chemistry. CHEM 4402 to be taken concurrently. (0-3-1) Prerequisites: CHEM 4401L Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 4410. Biochemistry. An introduction to the compounds, chemical reactions, and mechanisms that are important to the processes of living organisms. The emphasis will be on the major biochemical topics of enzyme structure and function, metabolism of sugars and fats, and the chemical aspects of genetic control of living organisms. Minimum grade of C required in Organic Chemistry I and II. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CHEM 3301 Minimum Grade C, or CHEM 3302 Minimum Grade C, or CHM 302 Minimum Grade C. BIOL 1107 or BIOL 2107 recommended. Prerequisites: CHEM 3301 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 3302 Minimum Grade: C or CHM 302 Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 4410H. Biochemistry.

CHEM 4410L. Biochemistry Laboratory. A study of techniques commonly used in biochemistry laboratories including isolation and properties of enzymes. CHEM 4410 to be taken concurrently. (0-3-1) Prerequisites: CHEM 3301L Minimum Grade: C and CHEM 3302L Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 4420. Advanced Biochemistry. This course continues the study of Biochemistry begun in CHEM 4410 to provide a more advanced treatment of certain topics such as enzyme kinetics and protein structure, and to include topics not previousely covered such as proteomics and cell signaling mechanisms. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CHEM 4410 Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 4450. Instrumental Analysis. An introduction to modern instrumental techniques with emphasis on those that are in general use in both research and industry. CHEM 4450L to be taken concurrently. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CHEM 2250 Minimum Grade: C or CHM 205 Minimum Grade: C ) or CHEM 3250 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 3302 Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 4450H. Instrumental Analysis-Honors.

CHEM 4450L. Instrumental Analysis Lab. An introduction to modern instrumental techniques in the laboratory with emphasis on application of specific methods to analytical problems. CHEM 4450 to be taken concurrently. (0-6-2) Prerequisites: CHEM 3250L Minimum Grade: C or CHM 205 Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 2250L Minimum Grade: C or CHEM 3302L Minimum Grade: C 

CHEM 4470. Special Problems. A two-hour directed study course designed to provide the advanced student with the opportunity to develop an interest in current topics in chemistry. Permission of instructor required. (0-4-2)

CHEM 4470H. Special Problems- Honors. A two-hour directed study course designed to provide the advanced student with the opportunity to develop an interest in current topics in chemistry. This section is for student participating in the GSW Honors Program. (0-4-2)

CHEM 4480. Special Problems II. A two-hour directed study course designed to provide the advanced student with the opportunity to develop an interest in current topics in chemistry. Permission of instructor required. (0-4-2)

CHEM 4491. Chemistry Seminar I. A course to acquaint students with the chemical literature. Each student will prepare a written and oral presentation on some topic of interest in current chemical literature. Eight hours of upper division chemistry and permission of instructor required in addition to course prerequisites. (1-0-1) Prerequisites: ( CHEM 3302 Minimum Grade: C or CHM 302 Minimum Grade: C ) 

CHEM 4492. Chemistry Seminar II. A course to acquaint students with the chemical literature. Each student will prepare a written and oral presentation on some topic of interest in current chemical literature. Eight hours of upper division chemistry and permission of instructor required in addition to course prerequisites. (1-0-1) Prerequisites: ( CHEM 3302 Minimum Grade: C or CHM 302 Minimum Grade: C ) and CHEM 4491 Minimum Grade: C 

Chinese

CHIN 1001. Elementary Chinese I. Elementary Chinese I is for persons with little or no background in Mandarin Chinese, and is designed to introduce the student to the language and culture.(3-0-3)

CHIN 1002. Elementary Chinese II. Elementary Chinese II is for persons with little or no background in Mandarin Chinese, and is designed to continue the introduction, begun in CHIN 1001, of the student to the language and culture (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CHIN 1001 

Information Technology

CIS 1000. Computer Applications. This course was developed as an exercise oriented approach to helping students to become familiar with computer applications through hands-on experience. Computer Applications includes document preparation, spreadsheets, databases, and presenation software. The course will also provide an introduction to computers, briefly discuss features of an operating system, and teach students how to use an Internet browser to do research using the Web. (3-0-3)

CIS 2000. Desktop Publ -Multimedia Pres. After the Desktop Publishing portion of this course, the student will be able to combine text and graphics on a page in a variety of formats using a desktop publishing software package. The multimedia styles covered include the use of text, sound, still images, animation, and video. An extensive hands-on approach using an authoring language, presentation software and multimedia will allow students to develop effective multimedia presentations.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: CIS 1000 or CIS 250 

CIS 2100. Microcomp Interfacing-Config. This course covers microcomputer hardware systems in interface design, configuration, upgrading, and troubleshooting. It also covers various modern bus structures, interrupts, interface controllers, parallel and serial I/O, multimedia devices, A/D and D/A conversion, and other major peripheral interfaces.(3-0-3)

CIS 3000. Internet Technologies. The course provides a comprehensive introduction to the tools and skills required for both client and server side programming, teaching students how to develop platform independent sites using current Web development technology. Essential programming exercises are presented using a manageable progression. Prerequisites: ( CIS 1000 ) 

CIS 3200. Microcomp Network Management. This course is an introduction to network management and administration. It presents a managerial perspective of the architecture, operations, and management network systems. There is an emphasis on design and implementation of microcomputer based network. Topics covered in this course include: network topology design, protocols, security configuration, and administration. Students will have hands-on experiments to manage users and groups, design and create security policies, disk management and internet services. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CIS 2100 ) or ( CIS 230 ) 

CIS 3300. Systems Anal Des-Implem I. This course provides the students with an introduction to technical and management issues in systems analysis and design. The course covers various issues such as the SDLC model, CASE tools, the systems analyst and the different roles of a systems analyst in an organization. It introduces students to various information gathering techniques, tools for project management, CPM, PERT charts, issues and models for sampling data sources, ER diagrams, data flow diagrams and data dictionaries. It includes an in- depth treatment of prototyping, the role of the user in prototyping and other issues related to prototyping. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CSCI 1301 or CSC 220 

CIS 3700. Information Resource Mgt. A course providing a broad overview of managing information system resources. This course will discuss planning, organizing, controlling, and the administration of information systems.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CIS 3300 ) or ( CIS 350 ) 

CIS 4200. Computer Security. This course provides an introduction to various topics of computer and information security, including but not limited to: cryptography, access control, authentication, vulnerability analysis, network security, and intrusion detection. Students will strengthen their understanding of basic security issues through a series of hands-on projects. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CIS 3200 or CSCI 3200. Prerequisites: ( CSCI 4210 ) or ( CSCI 2920 ) 

CIS 4310. Information Sys Project Mgnt. This course provides background knowledge in information technology project management. The course covers several aspects of project management such as project integration management, scope management, time, cost, and risk management, project quality management, and human resource management. Students will have hands-on experience in using project managment software such as MS Project 2007. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: CIS 3300 Prerequisites: CIS 3300 

CIS 4400. Information Storage-Retrieval. This course will discuss the data structures, techniques and algorithms needed to build information retrieval systems. Topics will include conceptual models of Information retrieval, text operations, query languages and operations, retrieval evaluation, indexing and searching, user interface and visualization.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: CSCI 2500 

CIS 4900. Special Problems in CIS. This course provides students with an opportunity to study and explore current computer information systems topics not covered in any other course. Students will also have the opportunity to design and implement software systems for business environments and to expand on projects from previous classes.(3-0-3)

Communications

COMM 1110. Fundamentals of Speech. Surveys the fundamental concepts of interpersonal and public communication, including the teaching and practice of some basic skills for both communication contexts. (3-0-3)

COMM 1110H. Fundamentals of Speech-Honors. See the course description for COMM 1110. This section is students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

COMM 1112. Video Production Practicum. Introductory level study of the process and craft of video production through application and practice. May be repeated twice. (0-2-1)

COMM 2112. Video Production Practicum. Intermediate level study of the process and craft of video production through application and practice. May be repeated twice. (0-2-1)

COMM 2225. Video Production I. The course will introduce students to the basic skills and techniques necessary for the production of a television program. Emphasis will be placed on videography, cameras, editing and lighting. Students will gain hands-on experience in making a video. (3-0-3)

COMM 3040. Integrated Comm & Theory. Analysis of understanding and application of complex theories and research in Human Communication study. Students will investigate the integration of effects of new media technologies on Human Communication. (3-0-3)

COMM 3112. Video Production Practicum. Advanced level study of the process and craft of producing video through application and practice. May be repeated twice. (0-2-1)

COMM 3225. Advanced Video Production. Advanced Video Production. Course focuses on focuses on electronic news gathering (ENG) for broadcast, including shooting B-roll, stand-ups and packages for news broadcast. Emphasis will also be placed on video news releases, and production for electronic distribution of news video. (3-0-3)

COMM 4080. Studies in New Media. Analysis of understanding, application, and research of critical concepts and hands-on skills in "new media" in the areas of medica such as film, television, and graphic designe for print publications. (3-0-3)

COMM 4112. Video Production Capstone. A capstone course designed to build on the student's cumulative experiential work in the process and craft of producing theatre through application and practice. Selection by audition or approval of instructor. (0-6-3)

COMM 4545. Issues in Comm & Media Studies. Issues in Communication and Media Studies. Analysis of understanding and application of environment, operation, culture, and diversity issues of media. Students will research and evaluate communication issues about media content and perspectives of media in everyday life. (3-0-3)

COMM 4585. Issues in Comm & Media Studies. Analysis of understanding and application of enrionment, operation, culture, and diversity issues of media. Students will research and evaluate communication issues about media content and perspectives of media in everyday life. (3-0-3)

Computer Science

CSCI 1301. Introduction to Programming I. The emphasis in this course is on problem solving and basic programming. A high-level language will be used to explain programming structure and style. Topics will include problem solving and algorithm development, data types, operators, methods, control structures, arrays, and program design.(4-0-4) Prerequisites: CIS 1000 Minimum Grade: C or CIS 1000 Minimum Grade: C or CIS 101 Minimum Grade: C 

CSCI 1301H. Intro to Programming I-Honors. The emphasis in this course is on problem solving and basic programming. A high-level language will be used to explain programming structure and style. Topics will include problem solving and algorithm development, data types, operators, methods, control structures, arrays, and program design. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (4-0-4)

CSCI 1302. Introduction to Programming II. This course will continue the development of concepts introduced in CSCI 1301. Advanced programming techniques will be emphasized. Students will be given the opportunity to design and implement complex programs using an object oriented approach. Topics to be covered include graphical user interface applications, programming based on events, exception handling, and database access. (4-0-4) Prerequisites: CSCI 1301 Minimum Grade: C or CSC 220 Minimum Grade: C 

CSCI 1302H. Intro to Programming II-Honors.

CSCI 2100. Assembly Language Programming. This course discusses the basic computer organization of the microcomputer and its assembly programming language, Assembly fundamentals, Macro Assembler, DEBUG, I/O services, numeric processing and conversion, string processing. Macro library, and Macro structures will be covered.(3-0-3)

CSCI 2500. Discrete Structures. This course provides a brief introduction to mathematical logic and typical proof methods, followed by a discussion of sets, function, and relations. The course also focuses on the mathematical techniques that are frequently used in computer science like counting techniques, elementary probability theory, combinatorics, recurrence relation, and asymptotic notation. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 1113 ) or ( MTH 111 ) 

CSCI 2920. Ethics in the Comp Profession. This course will first cover some types of ethical theory and codes of ethics for computer professionals. It will then discuss such topics as the responsibility and liability of software creators and software vendors, computers and privacy, computers and the distribution of power in our society, and ownership of software. (1-0-1)

CSCI 3100. Introduction to Computer Org. This course introduces students to the fundaments of digital logic design. It covers basic combinational and sequential logic components and the design of combinational and sequential circuits. It also introduces block-level design of complex functions, ALU design, control unit design and instruction set design.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: CSCI 2100 

CSCI 3200. UNIX. The goal of this course is to provide knowledge of UNIX applications interface, guiding the student through operating system utilities including process, file, storage and I/O management. Cover important UNIX concepts, like interprocess communication and I/O redirection with shell commands to enhance understanding of both and to discuss Bourne and C Shell Programming. . Prerequisites: CSCI 1301 or CSCI 1301H 

CSCI 3200H. UNIX. Prerequisites: CSCI 1301 Minimum Grade: C or CSCI 1301H Minimum Grade: C

CSCI 3300. Concepts of Programming Lang. The course provides an introduction to the basic paradigms and techniques of imperative, functional, logic, object- oriented, and concurrent programming languages. Using illustrative examples, the student will be exposed to various programming languages representative of the above paradigms.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CSCI 3500 ) or ( CSC 310 ) 

CSCI 3500. Data Structures and Algorithms. This course covers the basic data structures including stacks, queues, linked lists, heaps, and various search trees, utilizing the abstract data type approach. Recursive algorithms, and search and hashing techniques are discussed. Sorting and searching algorithms are analyzed for space and time complexities.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CSCI 1302 ) and ( CSCI 2500 ) or ( CSC 231 ) and ( CSC 235 ) 

CSCI 4100. Computer Architecture. This course covers the basic concepts and design issues in the hardware design and computer systems. Block level design issues, data processing unit design, instruction set design, RISC vs. CISC issues, hardwired and microprogrammed control unit design, memory organization, the system bus structure, IO processors and DMA / Interrupts are also discussed. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CSCI 3100 ) or ( CSC 360 ) 

CSCI 4110. Introduction to VLSI Design. This course will discuss CMOS technology, circuit design, layout, and system design. The course will progress from a circuit view of CMOS IC design to a subsystem view of CMOS VLSI emphasizing the semi-custom design approach.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CSCI 4100 ) or ( CSC 400 ) 

CSCI 4200. Design of Operating Systems. This course introduces the general principles of designing and implementing an operating system. Topics include memory management, processor management, process synchronization, device management, and file systems. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CSCI 3500 ) or ( CSC 310 ) 

CSCI 4200H. Design of Operating Systems.

CSCI 4210. Data Comm-Computer Networks. This course covers elementry communications theory, fundamental communication concepts, layered protocols, network switching, distributed processing, error detection and correction, routing algorithms, network security, topology, and management.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CSCI 4200 ) or ( CSC 421 ) 

CSCI 4300. Software Engineering. This course introduces basic software engineering principles. The course will discuss scope of software engineering, software process, life cycle models, team organizations, testing, introduction to objects, and phases of software life cycle.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: CSCI 1302 Minimum Grade: C 

CSCI 4310. Object Oriented Programming. The important features of objects such as inheritance, interfaces, and polymorphism will be introduced. Specific topics include systematic approach to program construction, preconditions, postconditions, and object-oriented design case studies. The students will be required to run a significant number of programs in an object-oriented programming language.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CSCI 1302 ) or ( CSC 231 ) 

CSCI 4320. Human Computer Interaction. This course will discuss interactive systems, human user, channels of communication; theories of human memory; variability and limits of human capabilities; theories of human reasoning and problem-solving, tasks and strategies, interactive devices and technologies, design of interfaces, dialogue design and styles; new ideas in interfaces, tools and techniques for the construction of interfaces, and methods of evaluation.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CIS 1000 ) 

CSCI 4400. Intro to Database Systems. This course will discuss the fundamental concepts necessary for the design, use and implementation of database systems. The topics include the relational model, the relational algebra, the ER model, SQL, functional dependencies, normalization, and relational design.(3-0-3) Prerequisite CSCI 2500. Prerequisites: ( CSCI 2500 ) 

CSCI 4500. Design- Analysi of Algorithms. This course provides techniques for designing and analyzing algorithms. It covers the various types of efficiency analysis including worst-case, average, and amortized complexity. It also presents the mail paradigms in the deisgn of algorithms (divide-and-conquer, greedy, dynamic programming, backtracking) for the main classes of algorithms. (3-0-3) Prerequisites (CSCI 3500) or (CSC 310) Prerequisites: ( CSCI 3500 ) or ( CSC 310 ) 

CSCI 4500H. Design-Analysi of Algorithms.

CSCI 4510. Theory of Computation. The course investigates the fundamental capabilities and limitations of computers. It covers finite automata, regular languages and sets, context-free grammars, pushdown automata, and Turing machines.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: CSCI 4500 

CSCI 4820. Principles Of ComputerGraphics. The course will cover the basic principles of two dimentional graphic display, algorithms, and modeling. It is the purpose of this course to present a theoretical understanding of elementary graphics rather than the use of a particular graphical programming language. Topics include extensive discussion of simple graphics primitives (lines, curves, polygons, etc.), polygon filling, color, pens, and brushes. Software libraries in an appropriate language will be used to implement class discussions. Display of three-dimensional objects is introduced. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CSCI 3500 ) or ( CSC 310 ) 

CSCI 4830. Artificial Intelligence. This course provides an introduction to the problems and techniques of Artificial Intelligence. It surveys the major subdisciplines of AI discussing such topics as problem spaces, search strategies, game theory with minimax and alpha-beta pruning, knowledge representation, machine learning, neural networks, and intelligent agents. An appropriate language for AI programming will be introduced. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CSCI 3500 ) or ( CSC 310 ) 

CSCI 4900. Special Problems in Comp Sci. This course provides students with an opportunity to study and explore current computer science topics not covered in any other course. Students will also have the opportunity to design and implement software systems for business environments and to expand on projects from previous classes.(3-0-3)

CSCI 4910. Junior-Senior Seminar. This course allows students to select and explore topics in the computing field and to make class presentations on these topics. Students will gain experience in preparing and delivering presentations to an audience of peers and in the critical evaluation of presentations. (1-0-1) .

CSCI 4930. Internship. The Internship gives students an opportunity to apply and extend the theoretical knowledge acquired in the classroom to a practical experience.(0-12-3)

CSCI 4940. Capstone Project. This project oriented course is intended for students who are nearing the end of their B.S. Degree in Computer Science or Information Technology. The purpose of this course is to provide a complex examination and review of various ideas and issues across the broad areas of computer science via hands-on projects. Student will develop interpersonal and team-working skills in this course. (1-2-3) Prerequisite: The student must be in the senior status.

Economics

ECON 2105. Principles of Macroeconomics. This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze economic aggregates and evaluate economic policies. (3-0-3)

ECON 2105H. Principles of Economics-Honors. This course is intended to introduce student to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze economic aggregates and evaluate economic policies. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

ECON 2105S. Prin Macroeconomics-Stdy Abrd. This principles of economics course is intended to introduce student to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze economic aggregates and evaluate economic policies. Taken as part of a study aboad experience. (3-0-3)

ECON 2106. Principles of Microeconomics. This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze structure and performance of the market economy. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ECON 2105 Minimum Grade: C or ECO 205 Minimum Grade: C or ECON 2105H Minimum Grade: C 

ECON 3510. Money and Banking. Monetary theories and role of banking institutions in capital formation, price determination, interest rates, and discount policies. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ECON 2105 Minimum Grade: C or ECO 205 Minimum Grade: C ) or ECON 2105H Minimum Grade: C 

ECON 4900. Special Topics in Economics. A variable credit course on selected issues, problems, and literature in economics. Must have permission of the Department Chairman. (3-0-3)

Early Childhood Education

EDEC 3100. Early Childhood Math. Activity oriented course that maodels the discovery approach of teaching mathematics and alternative assessment measures to monitor individual and class growth. Content will feature investigations of numbers (patterns, operations and properties), statistics-graphing, and elementary geometry. Attention also given to effective teaching practices and materials that will assist students in making the transition from student to teacher. Field experience required. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDEC 3400. Teaching in EC Education. A study of the curriculum for children in grades P-5. Topics include strategies for planning, implementing, and evaluating learning for diverse populations of children, and for creating and supporting a constructivist learning environment. Current research related to "best" practices will be included. The course requires 45 hours of field experience in which the student completes assignments relevant to the course in a P-5 grade setting. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDEC 3400H. Teaching in EC-HONORS. A study of the curriculum for children in grades P-5. Topics include strategies for planning, implementing, and evaluating learning for diverse populations of children, and for creating and supporting a constructivist learning environment. Current research related to "best" practices will be included. The course requires 45 hours of field experience in which the student completes assignments relevant to the course in a P-5 grade setting. (2-3-3)

EDEC 3450. Org and Managing EC Classroom. The course will acquaint students with standards and skills for organizing and managing classrooms and behavior for children of diverse developmental levels, abilities, ethnicity, culture, language, and exceptionalities in grades P-5. The course requires 45 hours of field experience in which the student completes assignments relevant to the course in a P-5 grade setting. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDEC 3600. Inquiry and Self Expression. Course content is focused on ways to support the development of skills in research, expository and creative writing, and other forms of self-expression. Techniques for assessing the development and achievement of inquiry and self-expression are included. Field experience required. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDEC 3600H. Inquiry & Self Expression-HNRS. Course content is focused on ways to support the development of skills in research, expository and creative writing, and other forms of self-expression. Techniques for assessing the development and achievement of inquiry and self-expression are included. Field experience required. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDEC 3650. Integrated EC Curriculum. The course introduces innovative strategies such as thematic units and project learning as vehicles to integrate into early childhood curriculum and address diverse learning needs in the elementary school classroom. Planning, implementing, and assessing integrated instruction and learning will be presented. Emphasis is on developing knowledge of and skills about the relationships across content area standards. The course requires 30 hours of field experience in which the student completes assignments relevant to the course in a P-5 grade classroom. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDEC 3650H. Integrated EC Curriculum-Honor. The course introduces innovative strategies such as thematic units and project learning as vehicles to integrate into early childhood curriculum and address diverse learning neeeds in the elementary school classroom. Planning, implementing, and assessing integrated instruction and learning will be presented. Emphasis is on developing knowledge of and skills about the rerlationships across content area standards. The course requires 30 hours of field experience in which the student completes assignments relevant to the course in a P-5 grade classroom. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (2-2-3)

EDEC 4200. Science in EC Education. This course is designed to develop basic science knowledge, concepts, and skills and incorporate them into learning experiences for young children in grades P-5. The content is drawn from a wide range of science topics. Emphasis is placed on student involvement in science and learning experiences. Field experience required. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDEC 4200H. Science in EC Ed - Honors. This course is designed to develop basic science knowledge, concepts, and skills and incorporate them into learning experiences for young children in grades P-5. The content is drawn from a wide range of science topics. Emphasis is placed on student involvement in science and learning experiences. Field experience required. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (2-1-3)

EDEC 4250. Social Studies for EC. This course is a study of the social curriculum for children in grades P-5. Objectives, concepts, content, techniques, materials, methods of inquiry, and evaluative procedures for teaching and learning in the primary grades are emphasized. A foundation for the use of the social sciences to support learning and the integration of content across the curriculum will be provided. Field experience required. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDEC 4250H. Social Studies for EC - Honors. This course is a study of the social curriculum for children in grades P-5. Objectives, concepts, content, techniques, materials, methods of inquiry, and evaluative procedures for teaching and learning in the primary grades are emphasized. A foundation for the use of the social sciences to support learning and the integration of content across the curriculum will be provided. Field experience required. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (2-1-3)

EDEC 4550. Assessment in EC Ed. A study of appropriate strategies for assessing the learning of young children. Formal assessment strategies, authentic assessment strategies, and teacher-developed strategies are introduced. The role of assessment in accountability within the context of child and school evaluation is examined. Field experience required. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDEC 4970. Student Teaching EC. Observations and teaching with emphasis on content knowledge under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected kindergarten and early elementary schools. A seminar component is included. (0-11-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDEC 4980. Student Teaching EC. Observations and teaching with emphasis on teaching skills under the direction an approved cooperating teacher in selected kindergarten and early elementary schools. A seminar component is included. (0-11-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDEC 4990. Student Teaching EC. Observations and teaching with emphasis on professionalism under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected kindergarten and early elementary schools. A seminar component is included. (0-11-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

Middle Grades Education

EDMG 3020. Middle Grades Learner-Philos. A survey of the history, philosophy, and organization of the middle school, and a comprehensive examination of the early adolescent learner in relation to learning and developmental theories. Extensive field experiences include observations and implementations of lessons for the middle school learner in area middle school. (3-5-5) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDMG 3030. MG Lang Arts Asessm-Applicat. A course designed for preservice teachers of children in grades four through eight, and those interested in providing optimal language development for effective communication of adolescents. Field experience required. (3-5-5) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDMG 3060. MG Science I Assess-Applic. A course designed to develop basic science knowledge, concepts and skills and incorporate them into activities for Middle Grades level science classes. The content is drawn from a wide range of science topics. Emphasis is placed on student involvement in science and activities. Field experience required. (3-5-5) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDMG 3100. MG Math Assess-Applic. Activity oriented course that models the discovery approach of teaching and mathematics and alternative assessment measures to monitor individual and class growth. Content will feature investigations of numbers (patterns, operations and properties), probability and statistics, and elementary geometry. Attention is also given to effective teaching practices and materials that will assist students in making the transition from student to teacher. Field experience required. (3-5-5) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDMG 4050. MG Soc Stud Assessm-Applica. A study of the social studies curriculum with emphasis on the program in grades 4-8. Objectives, concepts, content, techniques and material, methods of inquiry, and evaluative procedure for appropriate grade levels are stressed. Field experience required. (3-5-5) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDMG 4970. Student Teaching Mid Grades. Observations and teaching with emphasis on content knowledge under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected middle schools. A seminar component is included. (0-10-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDMG 4980. Student Teaching Mid Grades. Observations and teaching with emphasis on teaching skills under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected middle schools. A seminar component is included. (0-10-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDMG 4990. Student Teaching Mid Grades. Observations and teaching with emphasis on professionalism under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected middle schools. A seminar component is included. (0-10-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

Reading Education

EDRG 3020. Language Arts. The study of communication skills with emphasis on reading, writing, speaking, and listening, as well as language history, grammar, and usage for preservice teachers in grades P-5. Emphasis on varied instructional strategies, materials, and assessment methods. Field experience required. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDRG 3040. Introduction to Reading. An introductory course in the reading skills, methods, and materials for grades P-12. Field experience required. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDRG 3060. Content Literacy. A course that focuses on fostering middle and secondary students' reading, writing, and study skills in various subject areas. Strategies for effective use of textual materials across the curriculum are emphasized. Additionally, diagnosis and remediation strategies are introduced. Field experience required. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDRG 3280. Literature for Children. A study of contemporary and traditional literature for children. A critical exploration of literature emphasizing helping young readers make inferences, make connections, and draw conclusions. In addition, the selection and evaluation of books and other texts and ways to involve children in analyzing literature selections are addressed. Field experience required. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDRG 4100. Anal-Corr Reading Disabil. A study in diagnostic-prescriptive reading instruction. Emphasis is on the use of varied diagnostic instruments, instructional procedures, and materials appropriate for use with readers requiring remediation. Field experience required. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

Secondary Education

EDSC 4060. Engl Pedagogy Assess-Applica. A pre-service course giving special emphasis to theory and practice in teaching English in secondary schools. Special emphases of the course include the following: planning, selecting, and evaluating instructional materials; classroom management, group interaction, and discipline; evaluating and reporting on pupil progress; and performing other instructional duties related to high school teaching. This course includes an assessment component and extensive field experience in the secondary English classroom. Recommended immediately prior to Student Teaching. (3-8-5) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSC 4060H. Engl Pedagogy Assess-Applica. See course description for EDSC 4060. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-8-5)

EDSC 4080. Math Pedagogy Assess-Applica. An analysis of mathematical content of grades 6-12, its organization, and presentation. Factors and activities contributing to the learning of this mathematical content will be covered. Math lab equipment, calculators, and com- puters will be utilized. Assessment will be a major component. Designed for secondary mathematics teachers. Recommended immediately prior to student teaching. Field Experience required. (3-8-5) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSC 4100. Hist Pedagogy Assess-Applica. A course designed to develop instructional skills in the secondary history classroom. This course includes an assessment component and extensive field experience in the secondary history classroom. Offered every Fall semester. (3-8-5) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSC 4970. Student Teaching in Secondary. Observations and teaching with emphasis on content knowledge uder the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected secondary schools. A seminar component is included. (0-12-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSC 4980. Student Teaching in Secondary. Observations and teaching with emphasis on teaching skills under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected secondary schools. A seminar component is included. (0-12-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSC 4990. Student Teaching in Secondary. Observations and teaching with emphasis on professionalism under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in seledted secondary schools. A seminar component is included. (0-12-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

Special Education

EDSP 2130. Tching Ind w Severe-Prof Dis. A study of the characteristics, nature, and education of individuals with severe/profound disabilities. Course includes materials and methods for teaching intellectually disabled, emotionally disturbed, physically disabled, and multi-disabled individuals. Field experience required. (2-1-3)

EDSP 2990. Prof Legal-Eth of Special Ed. Explores the teacher's commitment to local, state and national professional organizations. Required of all Special Education majors. May be repeated for credit. Professional standards, ethics, and teacher dispositions are emphasized. (1-0-1)

EDSP 3000. The Exceptional Student. A study of the identification, characteristics, and educational needs of exceptional learners from preschool to adulthood. The course includes appropriate learning environments and current best practices for the education of all learners. Field experience required. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: Teacher Education 1 

EDSP 4051. Inclusion-Collaborative Stra. Methods for effective inclusion and models for collaboration and co-teaching in interrelated special education settings. Includes techniques for locating and utilizing appropriate community resources to increase support and services for individuals with disabilities and their families. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSP 4060. Acquisition-Dev of Language. A study of the speech and language development of individuals from birth to adolescence with emphasis on normal language development and possible deviations demonstrated by pupils with disabilities. Diagnostic instruments with implications for educational methods, materials, and communication techniques are studied. Field experience required. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSP 4110. Nature of Intellectual Disabil. Social, emotional, and cognitive characteristics and education of individuals with intellectual disabilities. Field experience required. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSP 4210. Nature of Behavior Disorders. Social, emotional and cognitive characteristics of individuals with behavior disorders. Field experience required. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSP 4310. Nature of Learning Disabilitie. Social, emotional, and cognitive characteristics of individuals with specific learning disabilities. Field experience required. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSP 4510. Assess of Learners w Disabil. Educational and adaptive behavior assessment of pupils with disabilities. Emphasis on basic measurement concepts and procedures for the administration of informal, standardized, and curriculum-based assessment instruments. Field experience required. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSP 4520. Special Ed Block Internship. Supervised internship in public school special education settings. Emphasis on applying knowledge of content in order to plan and implement curriculum; use effective principles of methodology, behavior management, and professionalism under the supervision of certified in-service teachers and a university supervisor. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSP 4550. Assistive Technology. Survey of current assistive technology available for use to improve the physical, social, communication, and learning abilities of individuals with disabilities. Techniques for the effective use of technology to provide effective individualization, evaluation, scheduling, and inclusion of pupils with disabilities. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSP 4610. Effective Instr for Mild Disab. Application of research-based instructional methods and best practices for individuals with mild disabilities. Field experience required. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSP 4620. Classroom-Beh Mgt for Disabili. Classroom and behavior management procedures and techniques based on principles of applied behavior analysis. Emphasis on strategies that promote effective learning, increase achievement, and improve pro-social behavior. Field experience required. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSP 4970. Student Teaching Special Edu. Observations and teaching with emphasis on content knowledge under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in the field of intended certification. A seminar component is included. (0-10-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSP 4980. Student Teaching Special Edu. Observations and teaching with emphasis on teaching skills under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in the field of intended certification. A seminar component is included. (0-10-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDSP 4990. Student Teaching Special Edu. Observations and teaching with emphasis on professionalism under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in the field of intended certification. A seminar component is included. (0-10-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

Education - General

EDUC 2110. Investigating Issues in Edu. This course engages students in observations, interactions, and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues. Students will investigage issues influencing the social and political contexts of educational settings in Georgia and the United States. Students will actively examine the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside the school. Against this backdrop, students will reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture and examine the moral and ethical responsibilities of teaching in a democracy. Field experience required. (2-1-3)

EDUC 2115. Mathematics & Science Instruct. The focus of this course is to provide intregrated mathematics and science instructional strategies for future teachers (grades P-12). An emphasis will be placed on the roles of planning and implementation of these strategies with individuals with mild disabilities. (3-0-3)

EDUC 2120. Exploring Diversity in Educ. Given the rapidly changing demographics in Georgia and the United States, this course is designed to equip future teachers with the fundamental knowledge of understanding culture and teaching children from diverse backgrounds. Specifically, this course is designed to examine: (1) the nature and function of culture; (2) the development of individual and group cultural identity; (3) definitions and implications of diversity; and (4) the influences of culture on learning, development, and pedagogy. Field Experience Required. (2-1-3)

EDUC 2130. Exploring Learning & Teaching. This course is designed to explore key aspects of learning and teaching through examining learning processes with the goal of applying knowledge to enhance the learning of all students in a variety of educational settings and contexts. Field Experience Required. (2-1-3)

EDUC 2130H. Exploring Learning & Teaching.

EDUC 3200. Instructional Tech-Media. An introduction to a wide range of computer based instructional media materials and equipment available for classroom use. The course focuses on the development of skills needed for effective instructional media production, applications and utilization. Candidates begin production of on-line portfolios. Course fulfills requirements of the Georgia Technology Standards for Educators. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDUC 3330. Art and Science of Teaching. The course presents a model for quality teaching that balances the necessity of research-based data with the equally vital need to understand the strengths and weaknesses of each student. This course will not meet the criteria for teacher certification. (3-0-3)

EDUC 3400. Learner in Multicultural Conte. This course focuses on the application of the knowledge of growth and development of P-12 students with a multicultural school seeting. In addition, the course examines various theories of learning, including cognitive, constructivist, behaviorist and social/cultural. It explores the influences of these theories on how humans as individuals and social beings learn, and their implications for structuring teaching and learning activities in P-12 classrooms. Through planned field experiences, teacher candidates will apply course information to diverse classroom settings. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDUC 4000. Senior Seminar in Teaching. A seminar for seniors in education on selected topics of classroom management, application, research and techniques. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDUC 4150. Prob in Classroom Management. A study of classroom problems and effective management techniques. May be repeated for credit. (1-0-1 or 2-0-2 or 3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDUC 4400. PE Materials and Methods. A course designed to present materials and instructional methods which will help preservice teachers of physical education gain an in-depth understanding of the teaching process related to P-12 teaching. Directed observation in the public schools is required. (3-4-4) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDUC 4620. Classroom/Behavior Mgt. Classroom and behavior management procedures and techniques based on principles of applied behavior analysis. Emphases on strategies that promote effective learning, increase achievement, and improve pro-social behavior. Field experience required. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDUC 4960. Practicum in Grades P-12. A supervised field experience for children in grades P-12. (0-8-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDUC 4970. Student Teaching in P-12. Observations and teaching with emphasis on content knowledge under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected elementary, middle and secondary schools. A seminar component is included. A seminar component is included. (0-10-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDUC 4980. Student Teaching in P-12. Observations and teaching with emphasis on teaching skills under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected elementary, middle and secondary schools. A seminar component is included. (0-10-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

EDUC 4990. Student Teaching in P-12. Observations and teaching with emphasis on professionalism under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected elementary middle and secondary schools. A seminar component is included. (0-10-3) Prerequisites: ( Teacher Education 1 or Teacher Education 2 ) 

English

ENGL 0099. Learning Support English II. Intermediate composition and grammar. Instruction and practice in expository or academic essay writing. The emphasis is on revising and editing essays, improving sentence structure, and mastering usage and mechanics. This course is designed to prepare students for college- level composition courses. The course may be repeated with a grade of S. (4-2-4)

ENGL 1101. Composition I. A composition course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with an emphasis on writing improvement. The course also seeks to strengthen critical thinking skills and the ability to read with understanding. (3-0-3)

ENGL 1101H. Honors Composition I. An Honors composition course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation, and also including introductory use of a varietyof research skills. A grade of C is required for advancement into ENGL 1102H or ENGL 1102. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

ENGL 1102. Composition II. A composition course that develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101, that emphasizes interpretation and evaluation, and that incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods. A minimum grade of C is required. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 101 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 1101H Minimum Grade: C 

ENGL 1102H. Honors Composition II. An Honors composition course that develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101H, that emphasizes interpretation and evaluation, and that incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods. A minimum grade of C is required. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 1101 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 101 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 1101H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 2110. World Literature. A survey of important works of world literature. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 1102H Minimum Grade: C 

ENGL 2110H. World Literature-Honors. An Honors course survey of important works of world literature. This section is for students participating in GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

ENGL 2111S. World Lit I-Study Abroad. See the course description for ENGL 2110. This course is offered in a study-abroad context. (3-0-3)

ENGL 2120. British Literature. A survey of important works of British literature. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 1102H Minimum Grade: C 

ENGL 2120H. British Literature-Hnr. An honors course survey of important works of British literature. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

ENGL 2130. American Literature. A survey of important works of American literature. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 1102H Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C 

ENGL 2130H. American Literature-Hnr. An honors course survey of important works of American literature. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

ENGL 2140. Backgrounds for Literature. The cultural and historical backgrounds to Western Literature from Sumner to the Renaissance emphasizing the foundational literary genres of the cultures as well as philosophical and psychological nature of mythology; dimensions of mythology in literature. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C 

ENGL 2200. Intro to Professional Writing. The course is designed to help writers understand and practice writing skills as employed across the professions. Students will be asked to master basic writing conventions and publishing procedures for journalistic, technical, managerial, creative, or scientific writing. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 1102H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 3010. Literature for Young Adults. A comprehensive study of young adult literature, including non-Western authors as well as literature representative of racial and ethnic groups, appropriate for students in secondary school programs, with emphasis on teaching techniques. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C )

ENGL 3211. Intro Study English Language. The course introduces basic concepts of linguistics and methods of language analysis, prepares student to apply these concepts to standard written language, formal speaking, and across cultures and dialects. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 3215H. Document Design-Honors. Course explores theories of layout and design for print and on-line media. This section is for students participating in the GSw Honors Program. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENGL 2200 Minimum Grade: C 

ENGL 3220. Adv Composition. A course in advanced composition with emphasis on the various methods of discourse as a basis for individual writing and for the teaching of writing. The course also includes a study of research in the teaching of writing. Recommended for students who are interested in writing and in teaching writing. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 1102H Minimum Grade: C 

ENGL 3230. Creative Writing. A workshop course in writing and literary criticism. Recommended to students whose test scores and performance indicate above average aptitude in English. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 1102H Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 3240. Technical Writing. The course focuses on career-oriented writing, with emphasis on the scientific, technological, and managerial areas. The course provides practice in various types of writing--such as reports, proposals, and instructions--that apply to these areas and teaches the special skills needed. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 102 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 1102H Minimum Grade: C 

ENGL 3340. The Novel. The history, development, and characteristics of the novel as a literary genre; parallel novels and literary criticism. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 3350. The Short Story. A study of selected short stories with emphasis on development of interpretive and analytical skills of the student. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 3360. Modern Prose. This course examines modern fiction from the late nineteenth and twentieth century. Novelists and short story writers who best express modern experience are read: Dostoyevsky, Nietzche, Faulkner, Salinger, Bellow, and others are included. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 3370. Modern Poetry. A study of major Modernist poets in the United States, England, and Ireland: Pound, Eliot, Yeats, Auden, Williams, Stevens, and others. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 3410. Southern Literature. A study in depth of the leading figures of the Southern Literary Rennaissance, with special emphasis on the social, political, and economic conditions in the post-bellum South that led to its development. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C 

ENGL 3420. African-American Literature. Survey of literature by African-American writers; emphasis on major novelists, on appreciation of the main intellectual and artistic concerns of the African-American culture, and on the role of literature within that culture. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 3430. World Survey Film Narrative. A study of a number of major film directors, the history of film-making and its techniques, and an introduction to film theory. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: D or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: D or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: D ) 

ENGL 4030. Theories of Rhetoric-Comp. The course surveys the history of rhetoric and examines pedagogical approaches to teaching composition. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 4040. Issues in Professional Writing. Course focuses on the ethics of professional and technical writing. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2200 Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 4040H. Issues in Professional Writing.

ENGL 4050. Writing-Civic Engagement. Students practice, study, and produce writing for nonprofits, community organizations, and government agencies in the classroom and in a real world setting. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4115. Medieval English Literature. Focused study in an area of medieval English literature, such as Chaucer, Anglo-Saxon heroic poetry, or Arthurian literature. Some of the course reading will be in either Old or Middle English depending upon the specific topic of the course. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 4120. Shakespeare I. A study of non-dramatic works with attention to the comedies and selected tragedies. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 4130. English Drama to 1642. English Drama to 1642 traces the development of drama from its beginnings in medieval times to the closing of the theaters by the Puritans in 1642. Shakespeare's plays are not included in this course. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 4135. Renaissance English Literature. Focused study in an area of renaissance English literature, such as Spenser, the Sonnet, or Jacobean drama. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C ) or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C 

ENGL 4140. Restoration-18th Cen Eng Lit. A study of the literature of Dryden, Swift, Addison, Steele, Johnson, Goldsmith and other eighteenth-century writers. Attention is given to the philosophical and literary currents of the period. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 4140H. Restoration-18th Cen Eng Lit-H.

ENGL 4150. Romantic Movement in England. The works of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C 

ENGL 4160. Victorian Literature. The works of the major Victorian writers with emphasis on Tennyson and Browning. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 4200. Colonial-Federalist Am Lit. The development of American literature from its colonial beginnings through the nascent federal government; emphasis on the main/intellectual currents. (3-0-3) Pre-requisites: ENGL 2110, ENGL 2120, or ENGL 2130. Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 4210. Romanticism in Amer Literature. The works of Emerson,Thoreau, Whitman, Hawthorne, Melville, and Poe. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 4210H. Romanticism in Amer Lit-Honors.

ENGL 4220. Realism in American Literature. The prose of Twain, Howells, James, Wharton, Crane, Steinbeck, and Hemingway, with special emphasis on the growth of the novel in America, conditions which fostered the growth of realism and its further development into naturalism. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 4930. Special Topics in Women's Lit. A seminar on a major author, or authors, movement, or theme in women's literature. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C 

ENGL 4940. Special Topics in Lit-Lang. A seminar on a major author(s), or theme in English studies not offered in the present catalogue of courses. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: D or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: D or ENG 202 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2112H Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: D ) 

ENGL 4965. Senior Capstone Seminar. Senior Capstone Seminar for majors in the final semester of study. Prerequisite: 12 hours of upper level English courses with a C or better; or, approval of department chair. (2-0-2) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2112 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C and ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C ) 

ENGL 4970. Georgia Intern Program. English-related internships for qualified students. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ENGL 2111 Minimum Grade: C or ENG 201 Minimum Grade: C and INTN 4920 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 2110 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130 Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2110H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2120H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2130H Minimum Grade: C or ENGL 2111H Minimum Grade: C ) 

Environmental Science

ENVS 1100. Intro to Environmental Science. This course is designed to provide non-science and science majors with an introduction to modern environmental science. This course seeks to help students explore the reasons behind major environmental issues and the consequences these issues have. Emphasis will be on general topics such as biodiversity, environmental chemistry, pollution, global climate change, sustainability, energy alternatives, waste management, and environmental policy. Prerequisites: Learning Support students must have exited LS Reading and LS Math. (3-0-3)

Finance

FINA 3100. Financial Planning. This class will prepare students to work in the financial services industry and to dispense advice to the clients. The course will cover personal financial securities and investments, taxation and investment, budgeting, and retirement planning. 3-0-3 Prerequisites: ACCT 2101 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 205 Minimum Grade: C 

FINA 3850. Real Estate Principles. An introduction to the principles of real estate analysis and utilization. Subjects include the nature of real property, the legal instruments involved in real property transactions, market analysis and the determinants of real estate values, the appraisal process, investment and financial analysis, and public policy aspects of real estate planning and utilization. Prerequisites: ( MKTG 3800 Minimum Grade: C or MKT 320 Minimum Grade: C ) 

French

FREN 1001. Elementary French I. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing in French and to the culture of French-speaking peoples. Not open to students with two year of high school French. Designed for students with no previous knowledge of French. Not open to native speakers. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

FREN 1001H. Elementary French I- Honors. An honors course. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing in French and to the culture of French- speaking peoples. Not open to students with two or more years of high school French. Designed for students with no previous knowledge of French. Not open to native speakers. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

FREN 1001S. Elem French-Study Abroad. See course description for FREN 1001. Taken as a study abroad experience. (3-0-3)

FREN 1002. Elementary French II. Continued listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French with further study of the culture of French-speaking peoples. Not open to native speakers. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: FREN 1001 Minimum Grade: C or FRH 101 Minimum Grade: C or FREN 1001H Minimum Grade: C 

FREN 2001. Intermediate French I. Continued emphasis in listening, speaking, reading, and writing with study of the culture of French-speaking people. Not open to native speakers. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: FREN 1002 Minimum Grade: C or FRH 102 Minimum Grade: C 

FREN 2002. Intermediate French II. An intensive review of French grammar. Selected readings with conversations and compositions based on the reading. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( FREN 2001 Minimum Grade: C or FRH 201 Minimum Grade: C ) 

FREN 2002H. Intermediate French II - Honor.

FREN 3110. French Culture-Civilization I. A survey of historical, sociological, philosophical, literary, and artistic developments of France up to modern times. Conducted in French. This is an on-line asynchronous Web-CT course. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( FREN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or FRH 202 Minimum Grade: C ) 

FREN 3120. French Cultr-Civilization II. A survey of the historical, sociological, philosophical, literary, and artistic development of modern-day France and the Francophone world. Conducted in French. This is an on-line, asynchronous Web-CT course. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( FREN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or FRH 202 Minimum Grade: C ) 

FREN 3530. French Lit of 18th Cent. Emphasis on the French philosophers Voltaire, Rousseau, Montesquieu, and Diderot. Laboratory work. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( FREN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or FRH 202 Minimum Grade: C ) 

FREN 4110. Adv Grammar-Composition. A detailed anc comprehensive coverage of the structure of French grammar. Emphasis on grammatical analysis, oral and written drills, translation, and composition. Conducted in French. This is an on-line, asynchronous Web-CT course. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( FREN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or FRH 202 Minimum Grade: C ) 

FREN 4210. Business French. An introduction to the economic and business practices of contemporary France and the Francophone world. Conducted in French. This is an on-line, asynchronous Web-CT course. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( FREN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or FRH 202 Minimum Grade: C ) 

Geology

GEOL 1121. Earth Mat., Processes, & Env.. To provide students with an introduction to our dynamic planet which includes processes that create Earth materials in the form of minerals and rocks and those geologic events which shape the earth's surface. (3-2-4)

GEOL 1121H. Honors Intro Geosciences I. Introductory Geosciences I for the Honors Program. (3-2-4)

GEOL 1122. Earth History & Global Change. To introduce students to the evidence for a long and dynamic earth history, the methods of logical interpretation of that evidence, and a brief summary of important events in the earth's history. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: GEOL 1121 or GEOL 1121H 

GEOL 1122H. Intro Geosciences II-Honors. Introductory Geosciences II for the Honors Program. (3-2-4)

GEOL 1122S. Intro Geosciences II-Study Abr. See description for GEOL 1122. Taken as a study abroad experience. (3-2-4)

GEOL 1142. The Geology of Georgia. Students will recognize and interpret common geologic structures, fossils, and rock types found in Georgia. They will travel to regions of geologic interest in the state where they will make geologic measurements and observations in the field in order to interpret Georgia's geologic history. An integrated lecture and field trip format will be used for the course. The class will include some outdoor activities such as hiking and camping. (2-3-3) Prerequisites: ( COMPASS Reading 80 or SAT Verbal 430 ) and GEOL 1121 

GEOL 1221. Solar System Exploration. A survey course designed to expose students to the nature and wonders of our solar system. The course will also cover the methods of space exploration which includes the Apollo lunar missions to the current on-going efforts such as the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Surveyor missions. The possibility of extraterrestrial life in the solar system and beyond will also be covered. (3-0-3)

GEOL 1221H. Solar Sys Exploration- HONORS. Solar System Exploration for the Honors Program. (3-0-3)

GEOL 3111. Environmental Geology. A study of human interaction with the environment. Topics include natural hazards, land use, waste management, and geologic aspects of environmental health. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: GEOL 1121 or ESC 110 

GEOL 3121. Mineralogy. A study of naturally occurring, crystalline substances. Laboratory work focuses on the physical, chemical, and crystallographic characteristics of important rock-forming and economic minerals. Lectures emphasize the generation and geologic occurrences of these minerals. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: GEOL 1121 or ESC 110 or GEOL 1121H 

GEOL 3131. Optical Mineralogy. An introductory section on physical optics will provide a basis for understanding the interaction of light and minerals. The petrographic microscope will then be used to distinguish the common rock-forming minerals, obtain compositional information, and decipher geologic histories. (1-2-2) Prerequisites: GEOL 3121 

GEOL 3211. Invertebrate Paleobiology. Paleontology has traditionally served the earth sciences primarily as a tool for determining the ages of rocks and inferring how they correlate from place to place. More recently it has become apparent that paleontology provides a unique historical viewpoint on the evolution of the natural environment. This course introduces students to the basic evidence of the earth's past life available to paleontolo- gists, assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of that evidence, and the logical application of that evidence to both traditional problems of correlation and to modern discussion of the evolutionary history of the Earth's environment. Permission of instructor also required in addition to course prerequisites. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: ( GEOL 1122 or ESC 120 ) or BIOL 2108 

GEOL 3311. Oceanography. The physical, chemical, geological, and biological characteristics of the ocean and the interactions between the hydrosphere, lithosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: GEOL 1121 or GEOL 1121H or ESC 110 

GEOL 3411. Geomorphology. An examination of the basic tectonic and erosional processes that influence the appearance of the Earth's surface, and the landforms that result from them. Emphasis will be on characterizing landforms descriptively and numerically, and inferring the processes responsible for their formation. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: GEOL 1121 or ESC 110 

GEOL 3511. Structural Geology. An introduction to the techniques and terminology used in the recognition and description of rock structures. An introductory section on rock mechanics will provide a basis for distinguishing and evaluating the rock properties and stress responsible for the contrasting styles of deformation. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: GEOL 1122 or ESC 120 

GEOL 3511H. Structural Geology-Honors. Structural Geology for the Honors Program. (3-2-4)

GEOL 3621. Inst Analysis in Geosciences. This course will provide students with the opportunity to learn operational procedures for specific research instrumentation housed within the Department (e.g., x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscope, etc.). In addition, the students will learn the theory behind the instrumentation, the various applications of this analytical tool, and how to interpret the resulting analytical data. Permission of instructor or Department Chair required in addition to course prerequisites. (1-0-1)

GEOL 4311. Sedimentation-Sed Petrology. Sedimentation deals with the study of sediment properties, transport mechanisms/dynamics, and the development of sedimentary structures as tools for interpreting paleoenvironments and for predicting rock texture. Sedimentary petrology involves understanding how weathering processes, transport mechanisms, and depositional systems leave interpretable records of themselves in rocks. Petrographic characteristics of the more common sedimentary rocks are examined in this context. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: GEOL 3121 

GEOL 4411. Stratigraphy. Principles of stratigraphy as applied to interpreting the relative and absolute ages of rocks and their local and global correlation. The course will also examine techniques for interpreting specific environments of deposition based on lithology, fossil content, and stratigraphic characteristics, and the application of combined facies and age assessments to understanding the evolution of depositional basins and their strata. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: GEOL 4311 or ESC 360 

GEOL 4421. Sedimentary Geology. A four-semester-hour course designed to introduce the student to the characteristics of sedimentary rocks at several scales. The first portion of the course comprises basic characteristics of individual rocks in hand sample and thin section. The interpretation of facies and sedimentary environments in which these rocks occur follows. The course concludes with concepts of stratigraphic correlation of sedimentary rocks and rock bodies across large regions, and of basin analysis. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: GEOL 1122 Minimum Grade: C or GEOL 1122H Minimum Grade: C 

GEOL 4611. Introduction to GIS. This class will introduce the modern techniques and tools of spatial data analysis. Lecture material will focus on the common terminology, software, hardware and techniques utilized in geographic information systems. Applications in scientific research, county and city planning, environmental projects and desktop mapping will be demonstrated and discussed. Lab exercises will involve spatial data collection and conversion, project structuring and presentation, and data interpretation. A general computer background is required. (3-2-4)

GEOL 4711. Igneous-Metamorphic Petrology. A study of the origins, characteristics, and classifications of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Petrographic, geochemical and structural data will be used to evaluate the origins and tectonic significance of specific rock suites. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: GEOL 3121 or GEO 321 

GEOL 4811. Introduction to Geophysics. Acquisition and interpretation of exploration geophysical data. Seismic reflection and refraction methods, gravity and magnetic fields, geoelectrical methods, and geophysical well logging. An introductory physics course is desirable but not necessary. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: GEOL 1122 

GEOL 4821. Environmental Geophysics. The student will identify which geophysical methods are used by industry and academia to solve environmental problems, and be able to associate seismic, potential field, electrical and electromagnetic methods with the particular problems to which the methods are best suited. The student will analyze and integrate the physical theory, field methodology, and interpretation of each method with geologic and engineering information to solve problems using real data sets. The student will also summarize and critique recent publications in the fields of engineering and environmental geophysics. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: GEOL 1122 and ( MATH 1111 or MATH 1113 or MATH 1120 or MATH 2221 or MATH 2222 ) 

GEOL 4911. Senior Seminar. Will provide senior geology majors with an opportunity to prepare and deliver presentations within various fields of the geosciences. Presentations will be followed by a critical review and discussion from their peers and faculty members. Senior standing in geology required. (1-0-1)

GEOL 4911H. Senior Seminar- Honors. Senior Seminar for the Honors Program. (1-0-1)

GEOL 4921. Geotectonics. An overview of the major structural and compositional features of the earth and the modern theories that explain their origin and development. A combination of paleontologic, petrologic, stratigraphic, structural and geophysical data from various global locations will be examined and interpreted. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: ( GEOL 4711 or ESC 460 ) and ( GEOL 3511 or ESC 301 ) and ( GEOL 4411 or ESC 212 ) 

GEOL 4931. Field Methods. An introduction to the current techniques and equipment used in the collection and interpretation of geologic field data. The course will not only examine classical techniques in sampling, surveying, and mapping, but will also provide field and lab experience using GPS (Global Positioning Systems) and GIS (Geographic Information Systems) equipment and software. Several half-day and extended field trips will focus on observational and interpretative skills, while follow-up projects will emphasize technical writing and effective data presentation. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: ( GEOL 3511 or ESC 301 ) 

GEOL 4941. Senior Thesis I. The course will provide seniors with the opportunity of collecting scientific data via laboratory and/or field work as part of an original research project. Prior to enrollment in Senior Thesis I, the student will submit a research proposal which will be reviewed and approved by his or her Thesis Director. Additional requirements include senior status with all required upper-level geology, math, and applied science courses completed. (1-0-1)

GEOL 4942. Senior Thesis II. This portion of Senior Thesis requires the student to employ critical and analytical thinking. Data collected in Senior Thesis I must be compiled and then evaluated for its scientific validity. Subsequently, conclusions must be drawn from this information. The significance of the findings in relation to the common body of knowledge in the geosciences will also be addressed by the student. All data collection methods, reslts and conclusions will be submitted to the Thesis Director in a specified journal format and will also be presented either at a professional meeting or an in-house seminar. Must have successfully completed GEOL 4941. (1-0-1)

GEOL 4951. Special Topics in Geology. A 2-4 semester hour course designed to provide upper level students with a course on current and emerging tpics in the world of geosciences. Credit will vary depending upon the topic selected. Prerequisite: GEOL 1122 and permission of instructor. (0-3 lecture, 0-2 lab, 2-4 credits total) Prerequisites: GEOL 1122 or ESC 120 

History

HIST 1111. World Civilization I. This course surveys world history to early modern times. (3-0-3)

HIST 1112. World Civilization II. This course surveys world history from early modern times to the present. May be taken before HIST 1111. (3-0-3)

HIST 2111. United States History I. This course focuses on American history from the discovery of the Western World through the Civil War. A passing grade in this course satisfies the U.S. history and Georgia history requirements of Georgia State Code 20-3-68. (3-0-3)

HIST 2112. United States History II. This course focuses on American history from Reconstruction to the present. A passing grade in this course satisfies the U.S. history and Georgia history requirements of Georgia Code 20-3-68. (3-0-3)

HIST 2500. The Study of History. This course is an introduction to the study of history. Required of all history majors. 2 credit hours. (2-0-2)

HIST 3510. American Colonial History. Major developments in American history between 1492 and 1789 are explored. (3-0-3)

HIST 3570. Civil War-Reconstruction. This course is an in-depth study of the Civil War and Reconstruction period of U.S. history focused on the background, political, social, economic, and military aspects of the period. (3-0-3)

HIST 3730. History of the Old South. This course examines the history of the South from the colonial period to the outbreak of the Civil War. Topics for study include the economic system of the Old South, slavery, antebellum Southern politics, and social and intellectual patterns of the Old South. (3-0-3)

HIST 3770. Black-American History. The focus of this course is the role of Blacks in the Western Hemisphere, with special emphasis on the struggles of African-Americans for equality and their contributions to American progress. (3-0-3)

HIST 3810. History of Georgia. This course surveys Georgia history from the beginning to the present. The course is of particular significance to prospective teachers in elementary and secondary schools. A passing grade in this course satisfies history of Georgia and the Constitution of Georgia requirements of Georgia State Code 20-3-68. (3-0-3)

HIST 4000. Historiography. This is the capstone senior seminar course required of all history majors. It entails a survey of leading writers who have produced the major historical works, with special emphasis on the intellectual and cultural influences that helped to shape their historical interpretations. Prerequisite: 15 hrs of upper division history or permission of the instructor. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: HIST 2500 Minimum Grade: C 

HIST 4050. Early Modern Europe. This course entails topical discussions of intellectural traditions and institutional structures in European history from 1648 to 1815. (3-0-3)

HIST 4100. 19th Cent Europe. This course focuses on the political, economic, and social history of Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I. (3-0-3)

HIST 4110. Europe in the 20th Cent. This course explores the history of Europe since 1914. The main political, social, economic, cultural, international, and intellectual movements are considered. (3-0-3)

HIST 4120. Modern Russia. This course examines the development of Russia from the reign of Peter I to the present democratic government. It addresses the geographic setting and the medieval background of Russian history, including the reforms of Peter I, the institution of serfdom, revolution and civil war at the beginning of the Twentieth Century, the Soviet State, the Second World War, the Cold War, and the collapse of Communism. (3-0-3)

HIST 4130. Eastern Europe. This course examines major events in the history of Eastern Europe. Among the major topics covered are the Byzantine Empire, the Ottoman Empire, The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Hapsburg Empire, national revivals, the World Wars, Communist domination and the collapse of Communism. The class will examine the political, cultural and economic aspects of these topics. (3-0-3)

HIST 4140. History of Modern Germany. This course explores the development of Germany from medieval times to the present. The geographic setting and medieval background of German history are addressed. Major topics covered include the Reformation, the 30 Year War, the unification of Germany by Bismarck, Hitler and the Nazi period, the Second World War, the Cold War and the collapse of Communism. (3-0-3)

HIST 4150. The Renaissance & Reformation. This course provides an introduction to European history from the fourteenth century to 1648, focusing on the Italian Renaissance and the various religious Reformations of sixteenth century Europe. (3-0-3)

HIST 4160. History of Medicine. This course will examine the history of medicine in a wide social context covering the impact of medicine on intellectual, economic, institutional, and cultural relationships from antiquity to the present. (3-0-3)

HIST 4540. US History, 1877-1920. This course focuses on American history from the rise of Populism through the Progressive Era, 1877-1920. (3-0-3)

HIST 4551. US History 1920 to 1945. This course surveys United States history from the end of World War I through World War II. (3-0-3)

HIST 4562. History of American Women. This course explores women's experiences in American history from the colonial era to the present. (3-0-3)

HIST 4780. History of the Middle East. This course covers the broad sweep of Middle Eastern history and culture. (3-0-3)

HIST 4781. History of North Africa. This course is designed to familiarize students with the history and culture of Northern Africa. (3-0-3)

HIST 4782. Gend/Minorities-MidEast/Africa. This course explores the history of gender and minorities in in the Middle East and North Africa. (3-0-3)

HIST 4900. Special Topics in History. Selected issues, problems, and literature in history are addressed in this course. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chair. (3-0-3)

HIST 4920. History Internship. History related internships are available for qualified students. See the Coordinator of Intern Programs for information. (3-0-3)

Honors

HONS 2000. University Honors Seminar. (1-0-1)

Health, PE, and Recreation

HPER 2021. Life Skills for Athletes-FR. The course focuses on the academic, athletic, and social issues that student-athletes face when entering college as freshmen. Provides information designed to help student athletes succeed not only on the field, but also academically, within their community, and in the job market. The course also assists the individual to explore the unique aspects of his/her experience as a student athlete, including personal idenity and integrity, throughout the college years. (2-0-2)

HPER 2022. Life Skills for Athletes-TRNS. The course focuses on the academic, athletic, and social issues that student-athleted face when entering college as transfers. Provides information designed to help student athletes succeed not only on the field, but also academically, within their community, and in the job market. The course also assists the individual to explore the unique aspects of his/her experience as a student-athlete, including personal identity and integrity, throughout the college years. (2-0-2)

HPER 2040. Sports Appreciation. Designed for students who are unable to participate in sports activities, with special emphasis being placed on aiding the student in becoming more knowledgeable and appreciative as a spectator or participant. (2-0-2)

HPER 2050. PE for EC Teachers. The purpose of this course is to enable teacher candidates to plan, organize, and conduct a physical education program for children in an early childhood educational setting. Candidates will be provided background knowledge about physical education content and how to teach movement skills and concepts. (2-0-2)

HPER 2060. Fundamentals of Baseball. Fundamentals and techniques involved in coaching baseball. (1-1-2)

HPER 2090. Athletic Training-Condition. Theory and practice of massage, bandaging, taping, and caring for athletic injuries. Provides basic information on injury prevention and immediate care of the more common sports injuries for those entering into the fields of coaching and/or physical education. Basic foundations are also provided for the student interested in more substantive areas of rehabilitation and allied health careers. (3-0-3)

HPER 2100. First Aid-Safety. American Red Cross standard courses in first aid and CPR (certification). (1-1-2)

HPER 2100H. First Aid-Safety - Honors. American Red Cross standard courses in first aid and CPR (certificaion). This section is for students participation in the GSW Honors Program. (1-1-2)

HPER 2170. Introduction to PE. Introduction to the fields of Health and Physical Education as pertains to program demands and employment opportunities. Trends in the past and current physical education movement emphasized. (1-0-1)

HPER 2180. Introduction to Recreation. Introduction to the field of Recreation. Emphasis is placed on abilities and personal characteristics, professional qualifications, and employment situation. (2-1-3)

HPER 2200. Maintenance of Rec Facilities. A course designed to acquaint recreation majors with the basic maintenance problems, procedures, and situations of recreation agencies. (2-0-2)

HPER 2240. Nutrition-Human Performance. A study of basic nutritional concepts as they relate to the exercising individual. Emphasis will be on the physiological response of proper nutrition and methods of enhancing exercise or athletic performance. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: BIOL 2030 Minimum Grade: C 

HPER 2350. Camp-Outdoor Recreation. The purpose of this course is to train camp leaders and counselors. Includes organized camping, camp counselor skills, camp activities, and camping and trail skills. (2-1-3)

HPER 2410. Social Recreation. Practical application of planning, demonstrating, and conducting activities and programs for various social events and gatherings. (2-0-2)

HPER 2500. Comp App HHP. This course is designed as a comprehensive overview of computer-based methods for accessing, analyzing, and communicating information in the area of health and human performance. The course will focus on the development of skills necessary for effective utilization of various computer tools and applications used in health, physical education, recreation and exercise science. (0-0-3)

HPER 3000. Recreation Practicum. A practical field work experience under supervision in an approved recreational and leisure setting. (0-4-4)

HPER 3010. Mat-Met in Health Education. This course is concerned with the understanding of the pedagogical basis and the content area for the total school health education program. Field experiences required. (2-2-3) Prerequisites: Teacher Education 1 

HPER 3050. Mat-Met EC Phys Education. A study of principles and procedures in conducting a program of health and physical education in the early childhood grades. Emphasis will be placed on methods of effective teaching, classroom management, growth and development of motor skills, and liability issues in the classroom and the gymnasium environment. Field experience required.(2-2-3)

HPER 3090. Adv Athletic Training. A concentrated study by means of participation, observation, discussion, and research pertaining to advanced topics in the evaluation of traumatic and non-traumatic athletic injuries, as well as injuries to children and older adults. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: HPER 2090 Minimum Grade: C 

HPER 3100. Community Health. Present day philosophy of the health care system including current needs and priorities in delivery of health services, intelligent consumer health selection, specific community health problems and solutions, and safety education. (3-0-3)

HPER 3240. Kinesiology. Study of the human movement, along with the various muscles, bones, and nerves utilized within those movements. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2030 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2040 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIO 203 Minimum Grade: C and BIO 204 Minimum Grade: C ) 

HPER 3250. Tests-Measurements PE. Methods in evaluating and testing in physical education and procedures to be used in evaluating these tests and their results, including statistical analysis. (3-0-3)

HPER 3260. Exercise Physiology. The current practice and theory of exercise physiology as applied to work, physical education, and sports. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2030 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2040 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIO 203 Minimum Grade: C and BIO 204 Minimum Grade: C ) 

HPER 3260H. Exercise Physiology-Honors. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2030 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2040 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BIO 203 Minimum Grade: C and BIO 204 Minimum Grade: C ) 

HPER 3280. Exercise Testing-Pres. The purpose of this course is to provide exercise science/wellness students with theoretical and practical knowledge of the various techniques used in clinical exercise testing and prescription for various populations. (2-1-3) Prerequisites: HPER 3260 Minimum Grade: C 

HPER 3300. Principles of Strength-Cond. The purpose of this course is to provide students with theoretical and practical knowledge of the physiological, biomechanical, and administrative aspects of designing and supervising strength and conditioning programs for various populations. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: BIOL 2030 Minimum Grade: C 

HPER 3310. Exercise Leadership. This course is designed to teach leadership skills, motivational techniques, choreography, administrative functions dealing with equipment purchase, organization and use and experiences leading aerobic exercise formats for a variety of populations. (3-0-3)

HPER 3310H. Exercise Leadership - Honors. (3-0-3)

HPER 3320. Health Promotion. A study of the principles and procedures necessary to effectively conduct health promotion program. The emphasis will be placed on the role of the health professional in developing wellness and preventive-oriented interventions to promote healthy lifestyles. (3-0-3)

HPER 3330. Ex Sci - Wellness Practicum. (0-4-4)

HPER 3350. Org-Adm of Recreation. Deals with administrative problems common to playground and community center directors and others having executive responsibilities in the field of recreation. (3-0-3)

HPER 3400. Health Behavior. This course is designed to provide health education and exercise science students with an understanding of theories and models upon which behavior change is based, and to practice skills and strategies that impact health behavior change. It is also designed to assist students in demonstrating a basic knowledge of the principles involved in motivation and program adherence and retention.

HPER 3410. Recreation Leadership. This course deals with the philosopical and practical aspects of program construction, leadership skills, and methods. (3-0-3)

HPER 3450. Exercise and Aging.

HPER 3500. Recreation Planning. Provides an understanding of the principles and objectives of planning recreation programs, facilities, space, and the interdependent relationship of activities to physical environment. Prerequisites: HPER 2180 Minimum Grade: C 

HPER 3550. Spec Prob in Special Populat. Selected problems confronting individuals with special needs in the areas of physical development, therapeutic activities, and physiological performance. Field experience required. (2-2-3)

HPER 3600. Tech of Teaching Sports Skills. Skills, appreciation, knowledge, and effective teaching techniques for individual, dual and team sports. (3-0-3)

HPER 3700. Cont Issues in Health. Scientific study of heal education with emphasis placed on the application of health facts and principles that are related to a better life physically, mentally and socially for the student today. (0-0-3)

HPER 3800. Family Health Issues. The study of various health issues as they relate to relationships and family life. Topics include sexuality and sexual behavior, family planning, pregnancy and childbirth, parenting, communication and interpersonal relationships, and violence and abuse. Field experience required. (2-2-3)

HPER 3900. Clinical Exercise Physiology. Prerequisites: HPER 3260 Minimum Grade: C 

HPER 4010. Theory and Coaching Football. Emphasis on the fundamentals of position play and methods of coaching offensive and defensive team play. The running, passing and kicking game will be presented. Complete organization of a football program. (2-0-2)

HPER 4020. Theory-Coaching Basketball. Practical experience in fundamental skills and techniques, team play and strategy. Specific offense and defense analyzed. A definite plan of offense and defense presented. (2-0-2)

HPER 4050. Recreation Internship. (0-4-4)

HPER 4060. Recreation Internship. (0-4-4)

HPER 4070. Recreation Internship. (0-4-4)

HPER 4100. Exer Sci - Wellness Internship. (0-4-4)

HPER 4110. Exer Sci - Wellness Internship. (0-4-4)

HPER 4120. Exer Sci - Wellness Internship. (0-4-4)

Internship

INTN 4920. Governor's Internship. Seminar in the general procedures and practices of student internships. This course is required of all student interns regardless of the area in which they are to receive intern credit. The course is designed to aid the student in performing the internship and to reward him for completion of the various tasks assigned by non-academic sources. See the Coordinator of Intern Program for information. (0-6-3)

INTN 4920A. Internship. (3-0-3)

INTN 4920B. Georgia Internship. (3-0-3)

INTN 4920C. Legislative Internship. (3-0-3)

INTN 4920D. Governor's Internship. (3-0-3)

INTN 4920E. Congressional Internship. (3-0-3)

Integrated Science

ISCI 2001. Life & Earth Sci for Teachers. This course is an integrated science course for Early Childhood Education students. This is a lecture course with an integrated lab component. Topics include: characteristics of life, interdependence of life, biodiversity, heredity, energy flow, cell structure and function, earth systems, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and the biosphere. (2-2-3)

ISCI 2002. Physical Science for Teachers. A three-semester-hour course designed to meet the needs of Early Childhood Education Majors. This is a lecture course with an integrated lab component. The student will investigate areas of the physical sciences, including but not limited to: the scientific method, the nature and properties of matter, chemical and physical change, conservation laws, forms of energy and their interaction, forces, motion, simple machines, and the characteristics of sound, light, electricity and magnetism. (2-2-3)

Learning Community

LC 10A. Learning Community Option 10A.

LC 10B. Learning Community Option 10B.

LC 10C. Learning Community Option 10C.

LC 10D. Learning Community Option 10D.

LC 11A. Learning Community Option 11A.

LC 11B. Learning Community Option 11B.

LC 11C. Learning Community Option 11C.

LC 11D. Learning Community Option 11D.

LC 12A. Learning Community Option 12A.

LC 12B. Learning Community Option 12B.

LC 12C. Learning Community Option 12C.

LC 12D. Learning Community Option 12D.

LC 12E. Learning Community Option 12E.

LC 13A. Learning Community Option 13A.

LC 13B. Learning Community Option 13B.

LC 13C. Learning Community Option 13C.

LC 13D. Learning Community Option 13D.

LC 14A. Learning Community Option 14A.

LC 14B. Learning Community Option 14B.

LC 14C. Learning Community Option 14C.

LC 14D. Learning Community Option 14D.

LC 14E. Learning Community Option 14E.

LC 14F. Learning Community Option 14F.

LC 14G. Learning Community Option 14G.

LC 15A. Learning Community Option 15A.

LC 15B. Learning Community Option 15B.

LC 15C. Learning Community Option 15C.

LC 15D. Learning Community Option 15D.

LC 15E. Learning Community Option 15E.

LC 15F. Learning Community Option 15F.

LC 16A. Learning Community Option 16A.

LC 16B. Learning Community Option 16B.

LC 16C. Learning Community Option 16C.

LC 16D. Learning Community Option 16D.

LC 17A. Learning Community Option 17A.

LC 17B. Learning Community Option 17B.

LC 17C. Learning Community Option 17C.

LC 17D. Learning Community Option 17D.

LC 17E. Learning Community Option 17E.

LC 18A. Learning Community Option 18A.

LC 18B. Learning Community Option 18B.

LC 18C. Learning Community Option 18C.

LC 18D. Learning Community Option 18D.

LC 18E. Learning Community Option 18E.

LC 19A. Learning Community Option 19A.

LC 19B. Learning Community Option 19B.

LC 19C. Learning Community Option 19C.

LC 1A. Learning Community Option 1A.

LC 1B. Learning Community Option 1B.

LC 1C. Learning Community Option 1C.

LC 1D. Learning Community Option 1D.

LC 1E. Learning Community Option 1E.

LC 2. Learning Community Option 2.

LC 20A. Learning Community Option 20A.

LC 20B. Learning Community Option 20B.

LC 20C. Learning Community Option 20C.

LC 21A. LRN COM Honors-SCI Opt 21A.

LC 21B. LRN COM Honors-NONSCI Opt 21B.

LC 21C. Learning Community Option 21C.

LC 21D. Learning Community Option 21D.

LC 2A. Learning Community Option 2A.

LC 2B. Learning Community Option 2B.

LC 2C. Learning Community Option 2C.

LC 2D. Learning Community Option 2D.

LC 3A. Learning Community Option 3A.

LC 3B. Learning Community Option 3B.

LC 3C. Learning Community Option 3C.

LC 3D. Learning Community Option 3D.

LC 3E. Learning Community Option 3E.

LC 3F. Learning Community Option 3F.

LC 3G. Learning Community Option 3G.

LC 3H. Learning Community Option 3H.

LC 4A. Learning Community Option 4A.

LC 4B. Learning Community Option 4B.

LC 4C. Learning Community Option 4C.

LC 4D. Learning Community Option 4D.

LC 4E. Learning Community Option 4E.

LC 5A. Learning Community Option 5A.

LC 5B. Learning Community Option 5B.

LC 5C. Learning Community Option 5C.

LC 5D. Learning Community Option 5D.

LC 5E. Learning Community Option 5E.

LC 5F. Learning Community Option 5F.

LC 6A. Learning Community Option 6A.

LC 6B. Learning Community Option 6B.

LC 6C. Learning Community Option 6C.

LC 6D. Learning Community Option 6D.

LC 7A. Learning Community Option 7A.

LC 7B. Learning Community Option 7B.

LC 7C. Learning Community Option 7C.

LC 7D. Learning Community 7D.

LC 8A. Learning Community Option 8A.

LC 8B. Learning Community Option 8B.

LC 8C. Learning Community Option 8C.

LC 8D. Learning Community Option 8D.

LC 8E. Learning Community Option 8E.

LC 9A. Learning Community Option 9A.

LC 9B. Learning Community Option 9B.

LC 9C. Learning Community Option 9C.

Leadership

LEAD 1000. Leadership Development. (2-0-2)

LEAD 2000. Leadership in Action. This course is a continuation of the leadership principles taught in LEAD 1000. Applications and strategies for working with college students in residence halls will be discussed along with the benefits of a residential component to a university campus. Stufdents will gain an understanding of the Resident Assistant position as a leadership role among peers. Prerequisite: LEAD 1000 (1-0-1)

Library

LIBR 1101. FDNS of Information Literacy. This course will emphasize Information Literacy theory and its importance as a lifelong learning skill. The knowledge, analytical skills, and competencies gained through participation in the course will provide students with a basis for academic success in all disciplines. (1-0-1)

Learning Support

LSPT 2000. Tutor Training. An introduction to contemporary learning theory and its application to one-to-one (tutorial) and small group learning situations. Emphasis will be placed on philosophy, procedures, and practice which are known to be effective on improving learning. Prerequisite: Recommendation of Department Chair, 3.00 GPA in course tutored, and permission from the instructor. (1-0-1)

Mathematics

MATH 0098. Learning Support Math I. MATH 0098. Learning Support Math I. A program of study in which a graphing calculator will be used extensively to facilitate the learning of basic algebra skills (operations with signed numbers, simplifying constant and variable expressions, solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities). One hour of laboratory work is required. Four hours institutional credit. (4-2-4).

MATH 0099. Learning Support Math II. A program of study preparing students for success in college -level mathematics. Enrollment is by placement, by satisfactory completion of MATH 0098, or by volunteering for the course. Course content includes operation on polynomials (including factoring), solving systems of equations, and solving quadratic equations. One hour of laboratory work is required. Four hours Institutional Credit. The course may be repeated with an S (Satisfactory) grade. (4-0-4)

MATH 1101. Introduction to Math Modeling. This course is designed as an entry-level college mathematics course at the same level as MATH 1111, but is intended for students who are not necessarily preparing for subsequent mathematics courses. It is an introduction to mathematical modeling based on the use of elementary functions, to describe and explore real world data and phenomena. Prerequisite: General High School Mathematics 3-0-3

MATH 1111. College Algebra. This course is a functional approach to algebra that incorporates the use of appropriate technology. Emphasis will be placed on the study of functions, and their graphs, inequalities, and linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Appropriate applications will be included. (3-0-3)

MATH 1111H. College Algebra-Honors. An Honors course that is a functional approach to algebra that incorporates the use of appropriate technology. Emphasis will be placed on the study of functions, and their graphs, inequalities, and linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Appropriate applications will be included. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program (3-0-3)

MATH 1113. Precalculus. This course is designed to prepare students for calculus, physics, and related technical subjects. Topics include an intensive study of algebraic and transcendental functions accompanied by analytic geometry. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Three years of high-school level mathematics.

MATH 1113H. Precalculus-Honors. This course is designed to prepare students for calculus, physic, and related technical subjects. Topics include an intensive study of algebraic and transcendental functions accompanied by analytic geometry. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

MATH 1120. Calculus I. A study of the fundamental concepts of the calculus: limits and continuity, differentiation, the mean value theorem, applications of differentiations, Riemann integration, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and elementary applications of integration. (4-0-4) Prerequisites: ( MATH 1113 or MTH 113 or MATH 1113H ) or ( MTH 110 and MTH 111 ) or ( MATH 1111 and MATH 1112 ) 

MATH 1120H. Calculus I - Honors. Calculus I for the Honors Program. (4-0-4) Prerequisites: ( MATH 1113 or MATH 1113H or MTH 113 ) 

MATH 2008. Fdns of Numbers & Operations. Introduces students to concepts of algebra, arithmetic and number theory appropriate for early childhood and middle grades classrooms. These include number bases, primality, divisibility and congruence, mental arithmetic and estimation, and techniques of problem solving. Use of appropriate classroom technology. Offered in fall semesters. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MATH 1111 Minimum Grade: C or MTH 110 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: C or MTH 113 Minimum Grade: C 

MATH 2204. Elementary Statistics. The study of the nature of statistics, the fundamental concepts of probability, the methods of collecting and analyzing data, and the techniques of making inferences based upon data. Technology, in the form of graphing calculators and statistical software, will be integrated in the course. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 1111 ) or ( MATH 110 ) or ( MATH 1113 ) or ( MATH 113 ) 

MATH 2204H. Elem Statistics- Honors. The study of the nature of statistics, the fundamental concepts of probability, the methods of collecting and analyzing data, and the techniques of making inferences based upon date. Technology, in the form of graphing calculators and statistical software, will be integrated in the course. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

MATH 2221. Calculus II. This is a continuation of Calculus I. It deals with further applications of one variable integration, the techniques of integration, sequences, series, indeterminant forms and improper integrals. Technology, in the form of graphing calculators and modeling software, will be integrated in the course. (4-0-4) Prerequisites: MATH 1120 or MTH 112 or MATH 1501 or MATH 1120H 

MATH 2221H. Calculus II-Honors. This is a continuation of Calculus I. It deals with further applications of one variable integration, the techniques of integration, sequences, series, indeterminant forms and improper integrals. Technology, in the form of graphing calculators and modeling software, will be integrated in the course. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (4-0-4)

MATH 2222. Calculus III. This is a continuation of Calculus II. It introduces students to the notions of vector calculus commonly used in engineering and science applications: vector and scalar functions of several variables, gradients, curl and divergence, mini-max theorems, multiple integrals, line integrals, the theorems of Green, Gauss and Stokes, and their applications. Technology in the form of graphing calculators and modeling software, will be integrated in the course. (4-0-4) Prerequisites: MATH 2221 or MTH 210 

MATH 2222H. Calculus III.

MATH 2223. Discrete Systems I. A course designed to give students an early experience of the power and applicability of discrete models in the solution of problems in mathematics, the sciences, computer science and engineering. Discrete I focuses on linear algebra and its applications. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MATH 2221 or MTH 210 or MATH 2222 or MTH 211. Prerequisites: MATH 2221 or MTH 210 or MATH 2222 or MTH 211 

MATH 2223H. Discrete Systems I - Honors. A course designed to give students an early experience of the power and applicability of discrete models in the solution of problems in mathematics, the sciences, computer science and engineering. Discrete Systems I focuses on linear algebra and its applications. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

MATH 2224. Discrete Systems II. Topics include number theory, graphs and algorithms, analysis of algorithms, Boolean logic, discrete stochastic models, and an applications-oriented introduction to modern algebra. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 2221 or MTH 210 ) or ( MATH 2222 or MTH 211 ) 

MATH 2224H. Discrete Systems II-Honors. Topics include number theory, graphs and algorithms, analysis of algorithms, Boolean logic, discrete stochastic models, and an applications-oriented introduction to modern algebra. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

MATH 3002. Geometry for Teachers. Euclidean geometry appropriate for middle grades and early childhood teachers. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: (MATH 1120 or MTH 112 or MATH 1113 or MTH 110 or MATH 1111) or (MTH 109 and MTH 109). Prerequisites: ( MATH 1120 or MTH 112 or MATH 1113 or MTH 110 or MATH 1111 ) or ( MTH 108 and MTH 109 ) 

MATH 3003. Probability&Stats for Teachers. This course is designed to teach students the concepts of probability and statistics appropriate for early childhood and middle grades classrooms, with emphasis on problem solving, active learning, and appropriate technology including calculators, electronic resources, and manipulatives. Students will also learn to use statistical techniques to make decisions in an educational environment. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MATH 1111 or MATH 1113 

MATH 3100. Modern Geometry. This course includes the study of topics in classical Euclidean Geometry, non-Euclidean Geometry (Spherical and Hyperbolic), Projective, Algebraic and Differential Geometry and Finite Geometry. The course also explores current research topics such as sphere packing and Fermat curves, and promotes the use of technology as a tool for geometric discovery. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 2222 or MTH 212 ) and ( MATH 2223 or MTH 312 ) 

MATH 3200. Number Theory. This course includes the study of divisibility, congruence, quadratic reciprocity, Diophantine equations, continued fractions, multiplicative functions, algebraic and transcendental numbers, and promotes the use of technology to explore advanced topics of current interest. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 2222 or MTH 212 ) and MATH 2224 

MATH 3313. Differential Equations. This course provides students of mathematics, science and pre-engineering with a qualitative, numeric and analytic approach to the dynamical systems commonly encountered in their disciplines. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 2222 or MTH 211 ) and ( MATH 2223 or MTH 312 ) 

MATH 3313H. Differential Equations- Honors. This course provides students of mathematics, science and pre-engineering with a qualitative, numeric and analytic approach to the dynamical systems commonly encountered in their disciplines. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

MATH 3316. Analysis I. This course introduces students to the basic elements of mathematical analysis. Topics include the topology of Euclidean space, sequences and limits, continuity and differentiation. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 2222 or MTH 211 ) and ( MATH 2223 or MTH 312 ) 

MATH 3317. Analysis II. A continuation of Analysis I. Topics include the integrals of Riemann-Stieltjes and Lebesque, infinite series and products, sequences of functions, Fourier series and integrals. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MATH 3316 

MATH 3320. Scientific Computation. An introduction to the elements of modern scientific compu- ting, using visualization, vector-level thinking skills, numeric models, and analytic techniques. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 2222 or MTH 211 ) and ( MATH 2223 or MTH 312 ) and ( CSCI 1301 or CSC 220 ) 

MATH 3322. Adv Mathematical Modeling. Teaches the art of mathematical modeling and the techniques of validation in deterministic and stochastic settings. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 2222 or MTH 211 ) and ( MATH 2204 or MTH 204 ) or ( MATH 3325 or MTH 325 ) 

MATH 3325. Mathematical Statistics. A course designed to give students of mathematics, computer science, the physical sciences, and pre-engineering a reasoned introduction to probability and statistics using the multivariable calculus. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 2222 or MTH 211 ) 

MATH 4412. Modern Algebra I. This course gives students an understanding of standard algebra structures: groups, rings, ideals and fields, and their relationship to models from number theory & geometry. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 2222 or MTH 211 ) and MATH 2224 

MATH 4413. Modern Algebra II. This is a continuation of Modern Algebra I. Topics include classification theorems for finite groups, field extensions, Galois theory and applications, algebraic coding theory. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 4412 or MTH 412 ) 

MATH 4440. Partial Differential Equations. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the elements of partial differential equations and related aspects of applied mathematics in a modeling context. Topics include boundary value problems, Fourier and generalized Fourier series, Fourier integrals, Laplace and Fourier transforms, the heat, wave, and potential equations. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 3313 or MTH 313 ) 

MATH 4442. Complex Analysis. An introduction to basic ideas concerning functions of one complex variable. Topics include analytic functions, Cauchy's integral theorem, series and products, calculus of residues, conformal mapping, asymptotic methods, and applications to heat conduction, electrostatics, aerodynamics and hydrodynamics. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MATH 3313 or MTH 313 Prerequisites: MATH 3313 or MTH 313 

MATH 4442H. Complex Analysis Honors.

MATH 4450. Topology I. A study of general topological spaces, continuity, compactness, connectedness, separability, characterization of metrizability. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: (MATH 3316 or MTH 314) Prerequisites: ( MATH 3316 or MTH 314 ) 

MATH 4451. Topology II. A continuation of Topology I, emphasizing the elements of geometric and algebraic topology. Topics include identification spaces, fundamental group, triangulations, surface theory and knot theory. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 4450 or MTH 450 ) and ( MATH 4412 or MTH 412 )

MATH 4454. Industrial Mathematics I. This course introduces students to a variety of mathematical techniques used to make organizational, scheduling, and optimization decisions in research and industrial settings. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 3313 or MTH 313 ) and ( MATH 3325 or MTH 325 ) 

MATH 4455. Industrial Mathematics II. A course that provides students with modeling and problem solving experiences that parallel applications of mathematics in industrial, and research and development settings. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MATH 4440 

MATH 4490. History and Philosophy of Math. Topics in the history of mathematics for pre-service teachers. A capstone course emphasizing key ideas in algebra, geometry, probability and statistics, and number theory, in a historical and philosophical context. (3-0-3)

MATH 4495. Mathematics for Grad School. Mathematical Preparation for Graduate Study is designed to give students in the BS in Mathematics program a coherent overview of undergraduate mathematics as it relates to graduate study, in a lecture, seminar, mini-research, and oral examination environment. Pre-requisite: Senior standing and approval of the chair of mathematics. (3-0-3)

MATH 4499. Sr Honors Thesis and Math. An opportunity for qualified and highly motivated students in mathematics to do mentored research under the guidance of a member of the mathematics faculty. (3-0-3)

MATH 4850. Special Prob in Mathematics. Special Topics in Mathematics offers students a variety of courses, either as lecture, or independent study, in areas Mathematics, which are not represented in the list of courses in the University catalougue. A topic may be offered a semester after it has been requested, subject to the approval of the department chair, and the instructor who will teach the course, or direct the independent study. Depending on the topic and depth of coverage, MATH 4850, may grant 1 to 3 hours of credit. (1-0-1, 2-0-2, 3-0-3).

Management

MGNT 3390. Human Resources Law. The current status of legal statutes and issues in human resource management is analyzed. Emerging issues and trends are explored. Taught fall term only. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MGNT 3600 or MGT 312 

MGNT 3600. Principles of Management. Management principles applicable to all types of cooperative enterprises. The vital functions of the manager are studied in detail. (3-0-3)

MGNT 3600H. Prin of Mgnt- HONORS. Management principles applicable to all types of cooperative enterprises. The vital functions of the manager are studied in detail. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

MGNT 3610. Operations Management. The application of management science principles to the actual management of operations. Through the application of these techniques, improved decisions are made as to hiring, firing, training, output planning and controlling, raw material acquisition, quality control budgeting, and maintenance expenditures as concerns business processes. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( BUSA 3050 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 2204 Minimum Grade: C or MTH 204 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312 Minimum Grade: C ) 

MGNT 3650. Introd to Internat'l Business. An introduction to the nature and environment of international business, multinational business operations, and the future of international business. (3-0-3)

MGNT 3670. Introd to Human Resource Mgt. This course is intended as an overview of the field of human resource management for the non-major. Emphasis will be placed on management responsibilities regarding the organization's human resources. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MGNT 3600 or MGT 312 

MGNT 3670S. Intro HR Mgmt -Study Abroad. This course is intended as an overview of the field of human resource management for the non-major. Emphasis will be placed on management responsibilities regarding the organization's human resources. Taken as part of a study abroad experience. (3-0-3)

MGNT 3680. Organizational Theory-Behav. The theory and application of behavioral interaction within organizations. Extensive use is made of practice exercises that require organizational effort in the classroom. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MGNT 3600 or MGT 312 

MGNT 3700. Information System for Mgnt. This course covers the fundamental principles of information technology and illustrates the effective use of information technology inmanagerial decision making. The focus will be on the role of IT in formulating and implementing strategies for competitive advantage. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( BUSA 2010 Minimum Grade: C or CIS 1000 Minimum Grade: C ) 

MGNT 4190. Strategic Management. A study of business strategy and strategic planning in relation to company resources, the environment, and changes which may bring opportunities or threats. An opportunity to apply one's skills through strategic case analysis and through the management of a manufacturing firm in a computer-simulated business situation. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( MKTG 3800 Minimum Grade: C or MKT 320 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BUSA 3150 Minimum Grade: C or BUS 313 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( BUSA 3050 Minimum Grade: C or BUS 350 Minimum Grade: C ) 

MGNT 4260. Small Bus./Entrepreneurship. An introduction to the world of small business including the principles of successful small business management. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312 Minimum Grade: C 

MGNT 4660. Business Forecasting. An introduction to the analysis of business fluctuations as a major factor in forecasting business activity on a general level as well as for the individual firm. The importance of forecasting is included along with consideration of macro- economic forces which affect forecasts and various methods of analysis for determination of cyclical factors and other methods of preparing and documenting forecasts. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: BUSA 3050 or MATH 2204 or MTH 204 

MGNT 4670. Adv Human Resource Mgnt. An overview of the personnel management function in organizations. It serves as an introductory course for the prospective personnel officer and as a survey of personnel responsibilities and activities for any manager with supervisory responsibilities. Taught fall term only. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MGNT 3600 or MGT 312 

MGNT 4680. Compensation Management. This course comes under the broad area of financial management and deals with rewards for the supply of labor. It addresses the ways in which both tangible and intangible forms of compensaton may be used to motivate and reward employee performance. The course also deals with job analysis, job description and job evaluation on the basis of compensable factors as well as designing an equitable pay structure. Additionally, compensation management analyzes the influence of unions and government in determining the compensation of the labor force. It deals with the compensation of both hourly workers and managerial employees. Taught spring term only. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312 Minimum Grade: C ) 

MGNT 4690. Labor Management Relations. An analysis of the industrial relations problems between organized labor and management, and the interrelationships of the union, its members, and the nonunion workers. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MGNT 3600 or MGT 312 

MGNT 4790. Current Issues in Human Resour. This course is designed for senior Human Resources students. It acts as a capstone course, and is conducted as a seminar. Current issues in the field of Human Resources will serve as the springboard for discussion and research. Students will have the opportunity to engage others in their field, and the instructor, in a collegial atmosphere designed to stimulate an appreciatioon and thorough understanding of the issues in the field. Taught spring term only. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MGNT 4670 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 421 Minimum Grade: C ) 

Marketing

MKTG 3800. Principles of Marketing. Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods and services from producer to consumer. (3-0-3)

MKTG 3850. Real Estate Principles. An introduction to the principles of real estate analysis and utilization. Subjects include the nature of real property, the legal instruments involved in real property transactions, market analysis and the determinants of real estate values, the appraisal process, investment and financial analysis, and public policy aspects of real estate planning and utilization. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MKTG 3800 Minimum Grade: C or MKT 320 Minimum Grade: C ) 

MKTG 4800. Personal Selling. This course is designed to provide the basic concepts and theories involved with developing and maintaining personal exchange relationships. Students participate in experiential exercises and selling role-playing to develop an understanding and appreciation of the skills required in being a successful salesperson. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MKTG 3800 Minimum Grade: C or MKT 320 Minimum Grade: C 

MKTG 4805. Sales Management. This couse is designed to provide students the basic concepts about managing a sales force and how to apply them to solve business problems. In addition, the course will introduce students to the sequence of activities that guide sales managers in the creation and administration of a successful sales program. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MKTG 3800 Minimum Grade: C or MKT 320 Minimum Grade: C ) 

MKTG 4820. Consumer Behavior. This course is a natural blending of psychology, social psychology, cultural anthropology, sociology, and marketing. Based on empirical research on what the consumer does and why, the course focuses on practical guidelines for the marketing manager. Decision-making models are analyzed, and implications for influencing decisions are highlighted. Although heavily laden with the conceptual frameworks of behavioral science, Consumber Behavior is taught as a marketing course. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MKTG 3800 or MKT 320 

MKTG 4830. Marketing Communications. An overview of methods, procedures, strategies, and applications in communicating with consumer and business markets as a integral part of the promotion function with respect to mass communications (advertising and public relations), personal selling, direct marketing, and sales promotion. The various media which may be employed in these forms of the promotion function and the effects upon resulting buyer behavior will be evaluated and considered in their specific applications. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MKTG 3800 Minimum Grade: C or MKT 320 Minimum Grade: C 

MKTG 4850. Marketing Channels. An overview of methods, procedures, strategies, and applications in the management of channels of distribution of products and services from producer to final consumer sale. This includes retailing for consumer goods, personnel selling and sales management for business goods, as well as transportation and logistic services. Consumer behavior for household purchasing in the retail market and business buying behavior in the business market are also included. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MKTG 3800 or MKT 320 

MKTG 4870. Sports Marketing. A course which examines the unique nature of marketing sport both as a participatory and spectator event. Emphasis is upon understanding the synergy of marketing, sport, and society. Consideration is given to marketing collegiate and professional sports. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MKTG 3800 Minimum Grade: C or MKT 320 Minimum Grade: C ) 

MKTG 4890. Marketing Management. An extension of the descriptive aspects of marketing principles into the arena of application. Emphasis is placed on the marketing planning process, environmental analysis, strategic marketing, and the effective implementation of marketing plans. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MKTG 3800 Minimum Grade: C or MKT 320 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312 Minimum Grade: C ) 

MKTG 4910. Marketing Research. A course to provide the student with a working knowledge of the principles and theory of business research applied specifically to the marketing environment. The course stresses both concepts and application. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( BUSA 3050 Minimum Grade: C or BUS 313 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( MKTG 3800 Minimum Grade: C or MKT 320 Minimum Grade: C ) and BUSA 2010 Minimum Grade: C 

Music

MUSC 0990. Recital Laboratory. A weekly laboratory designed to provide experiences in hearing live performances of a wide variety of music including student recitals, guest performances, master classes, and other concerts listed by the music faculty. All majors must register for this class for seven semesters. Transfers will be assessed by the music faculty to determine how many semesters of MUSC 0990 they will need to complete their degree requirements. (0-1-0)

MUSC 1100. Music Appreciation. Introduction to music listening and literature. A study of traditional forms of music from ancient times to the present with emphasis on the basic elements of music and their relationship. This study emphasizes the development of listening skills and musical understanding. (3-0-3)

MUSC 1100H. Honors Music Appreciation. Introduction to music listening and literature. A study of traditional forms of music from ancient times to the present with emphasis on the basic elements of music and their relationship. This study emphasizes the development of listening skills and musical understanding. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

MUSC 1100S. Music Apprec - Study Abroad. Introduction to music listening and literature. A study of traditional forms of music from ancient times to the present with emphasis on the basic elements of music and their relationship. This study emphasizes the development of listening skills and musical understanding. (3-0-3)

MUSC 1150. History of Rock & Roll. The History of Rock and Roll is an in depth study of the origins of popular music in the 20th century and the social and historical context that gave birth to it and related genres and musical offshoots. 3-0-3

MUSC 1201. Elementary Harmony Pt I. A study of the fundamentals of music including intervals, triads, keys, scales, modes, meter, part-writing, figured bass, harmonic analysis, and an intro to modulation. Theory Placement Test required. (3-0-3)

MUSC 1201H. Elementary Harmony Pt I-Honors. A study of the fundamentals of music including intervals, triads, keys, scales, modes, meter, part-writing, figured bass, harmonic analysis, and an intro to modulation. Theory Placement Test required. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

MUSC 1202. Elementary Harmony Pt 2. Continuation of study covered in MUSC 1201 expanding to non-harmonic tones, 7th chords, secondary dominants, augmented 6th chords and Neapolitan 6th chords with harmonic analysis to early 19th century. (3-0-3) Pre-requisites: MUSC 1201 Minimum Grade: C Prerequisites: MUSC 1201 Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 1211. Sight Singing I. A course designed to develop sight reading skills involving ear training, keyboard performance skills, and sight singing. (1-0-1)

MUSC 1212. Sight Singing II. Continuation of study covered in MUSC 1211 concentrating on improving skills of ear-training, keyboard performance, and sight singing. (1-0-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 1211 Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 1401. Group Piano I. Practical skills and techniques for expressive piano performance, to include the following: reading, improvisation, harmonization, transposition, and sight reading. This course will also provide a variety of piano pieces in contrasting styles for solo and ensemble performance emphasizing melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structures. (2-0-2)

MUSC 1402. Group Piano II. Practical skills and techniques for expressive piano performance, maintaining and refining the techniques of reading, improvisation, harmonization, transposition, sight reading. This course will also build a repertory of solo piano pieces; analyze rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic structures; and perform solo pieces as well as accompaniments to instrumental and vocal solos. (2-0-2) Prerequisites: MUSC 1401 Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 151A. Flute. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151B. Oboe. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151C. Clarinet. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151D. Clarinet Bass. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151E. Bassoon. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151F. Saxophone Alto. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151G. Saxophone Tenor. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151H. Trumpet. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151I. French Horn. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151J. Trombone. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151K. Euphonium. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151L. Tuba. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151M. Percussion. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151N. Piano. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151P. Organ. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151Q. Harpsichord. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151W. Voice. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151X. Guitar. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 151Y. String Bass. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for band or choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 152A. Flute. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 151A 

MUSC 152B. Oboe. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 152C. Clarinet. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 151C 

MUSC 152D. Bass Clarinet. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 151D 

MUSC 152E. Bassoon. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 151E 

MUSC 152F. Saxophone Alto. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 151F 

MUSC 152G. Saxophone Tenor. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 152H. Trumpet. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 152I. French Horn. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 152J. Trombone. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 152K. Euphonium. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 151K 

MUSC 152L. Tuba. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 152M. Percussion. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 151M Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 152N. Piano. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 152P. Organ. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 152Q. Harpsichord. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 152W. Voice. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 152X. Guitar. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 151X Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 152Y. String Bass. Freshmen music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 151Y Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 171. Bassoon.

MUSC 171A. Flute. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171B. Oboe. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171C. Clarinet. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171D. Clarinet Bass. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171F. Saxophone Alto. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171G. Saxophone Tenor. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171H. Trumpet. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171I. French Horn. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171J. Trombone. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171K. Euphonium. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171L. Tuba. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171M. Percussion. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171N. Piano. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171P. Organ. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171W. Voice. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171X. Guitar. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 172. Applied Music. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171 Minimum Grade: C or MUS 161 Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172A. Flute. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171A Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172B. Oboe. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171B Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172C. Clarinet. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171C Minimum Grade: C or MUS 161C Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172D. Clarinet Bass. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171D Minimum Grade: C or MUS 161D Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172E. Bassoon. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1). Prerequisites: MUSC 171E Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172F. Saxophone Alto. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171F Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172G. Saxophone Tenor. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171G Minimum Grade: C or MUS 1610 Minimum Grade: C

MUSC 172H. Trumpet. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171H Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172I. French Horn. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171I Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172J. Trombone. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171J Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172K. Euphonium. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171K Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172L. Tuba. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171L Minimum Grade: C or MUS 171S Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172M. Percussion. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171M Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172N. Piano. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171N Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172P. Organ. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171P Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172Q. Harpsichord. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171Q Minimum Grade: C or MUS 171Y Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172W. Voice. Freshmen music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 171W Minimum Grade: C or MUS 171W Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 172X. Guitar. Minor area. Freshman level. One hour guitar lesson per week. Prerequisites: MUSC 171X Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 2020. GSW Concert Choir. A mixed, auditioned chamber choral organization performing Renaissance through 20th Century repertoire for collegiate level performance standards. Credit: 1 hour. Offered F, Sp. May be taken more than once.

MUSC 2030. GSW Chamber Singers. An auditioned chamber choral ensemble specializing in Renaissance madrigal repertoire, vocal chamber literature, and 20th century vocal jazz. Especially geared towards music majors as an introduction to choral literature beyond the level of Concert Choir. May be repeated. (3-0-1) Co-requisites: MUSC 2090

MUSC 2080. GSW Concert Band. An instrumental ensemble which provides the student an opportunity to study and perform the best in standard and contemporary band literature. May be repeated. (2-0-1)

MUSC 2090. GSW Concert Choir. A mixed, non-auditioned choral organization performing Renaissance through 20th Century repertoire for collegiate level performance standards. May be taken more than once. (2-0-1)

MUSC 2120. Small Ensemble. An auditioned chamber ensemble performance experience in brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments. May be repeated. (2-0-1)

MUSC 2130. Jazz Band. An auditioned jazz band which provides the student an opportunity to study and perform the best in jazz literature. Opportunities for solo-improvisation are provided. May be repeated. (2-0-1)

MUSC 2203. Intermediate Harmony. Continuation of materials covered in MUSC 1201 & 1202 expanding to mid and later 19th Century harmonic analysis, melody harmonization, introductory composition exercises, and an introduction to arranging, orchestration, and counterpoint. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MUSC 1202 Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 2213. Sight Singing III. Continuation of sight reading and sight singing skills taught in MUSC 1211 and 1213 with emphasis on ear-training, keyboard performance skills, and singing. (1-0-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 1212 Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 2214. Sight Singing IV. Continuation of sight reading and sight singing skills taught in MUSC 1211, 1213, and 2213 with emphasis on ear training, keyboard performance skills, and singing. (1-0-1) Pre-requisites: MUSC 2213 Minimum Grade: C Prerequisites: MUSC 2213 Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 2303. Intermediate Harmony. Continuation of materials covered in MUSC 1201 & 1202 expanding to mid and later 19th Century harmonic analysis, melody harmonization, introductory composition exercises, and an introduction to arranging, orchestration, and counterpoint. Prerequisite: MUSC 1202. Credit: 3 hours. Offered every four semesters.

MUSC 2400. Introduction to Conducting. Introduction and development of skills basic to instrumental and choral conducting. (2-0-1) Pre-requisite: MYSC 1201 Minimum grade: C

MUSC 251A. Flute. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251B. Oboe. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251C. Clarinet. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251D. Clarinet Bass. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251E. Bassoon. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251F. Saxophone Alto. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251G. Saxophone Tenor. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251H. Trumpet. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251I. French Horn. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251J. Trombone. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251K. Euphonium. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 152K 

MUSC 251L. Tuba. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251M. Percussion. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251N. Piano. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251P. Organ. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251Q. Harpsichord. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251W. Voice. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251X. Guitar. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 152X Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 251Y. String Bass. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 252A. Flute. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251A Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252B. Oboe. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251B Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252C. Clarinet. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251C Minimum Grade: C or MUS 251C Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252D. Clarinet Bass. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251D Minimum Grade: C or MUS 251D Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252E. Bassoon. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251E Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252F. Saxophone Alto. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251F Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252G. Saxophone Tenor. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251G Minimum Grade: C or MUS 251O Minimum Grade: C

MUSC 252H. Trumpet. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251H Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252I. French Horn. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251I Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252J. Trombone. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251J Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252K. Euphonium. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251K Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252L. Tuba. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251L Minimum Grade: C or MUS 251S Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252M. Percussion. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251M Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252N. Piano. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251N Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252P. Organ. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251P Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252Q. Harpsichord. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251Q Minimum Grade: C or MUS 251Y Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252W. Voice. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251W Minimum Grade: C or MUS 251W Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252X. Guitar. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251X Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 252Y. String Bass. Sophomore music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 251Y Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 2650. Early Childhood Music. A study of the fundamental concepts of music neededby early childhood grade teachers and the application of the concepts to musical activities appropriate for growth and development in music at this level. (2-0-2)

MUSC 271A. Flute. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271B. Oboe. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271C. Clarinet. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271D. Clarinet Bass. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271E. Bassoon. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271F. Saxophone Alto. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271G. Saxophone Tenor. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271H. Trumpet. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271I. French Horn. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271J. Trombone. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271K. Euphonium. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271L. Tuba. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271M. Percussion. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271N. Piano. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271P. Organ. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271Q. Harpsichord. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271W. Voice. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 172W 

MUSC 271X. Guitar. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 252X Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 272A. Flute. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271A Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 272B. Oboe. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271B Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 272C. Clarinet. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271C Minimum Grade: C or MUS 271C Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 272D. Clarinet Bass. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271D Minimum Grade: C or MUS 271D Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 272E. Bassoon. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271E Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 272F. Saxophone Alto. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271F Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 272G. Saxophone Tenor. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271G Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 272H. Trumpet. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271H Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 272I. French Horn. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271I 

MUSC 272J. Trombone. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271J Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 272K. Euphonium. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271K Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 272L. Tuba. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271L Minimum Grade: C or MUS 271S Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 272M. Percussion. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271M 

MUSC 272N. Piano. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271N Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 272P. Organ. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271P Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 272Q. Harpsichord. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271Q 

MUSC 272W. Voice. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271W 

MUSC 272X. Guitar. Sophomore music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 271X Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 3040. GSW Chamber Singers. An advanced auditioned chamber choral ensemble specializing in Renaissance madrigal repertoire, vocal chamber literature, and 20th century vocal jazz. Especially geared towards music majors as an introduction to choral literature beyond the level of Concert Choir. (3-0-1)

MUSC 3090. Music in the Elementary School. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the curriculm, materials, and methods of teaching music in preschool through elementary grades. (3-0-3) Pre-requisite: MUSC 3204 Minimum grade: C

MUSC 3093. Choral Music,Secondary School. A course involved with materials and methods necessary in conducting a secondary choral music program. (3-4-3) Pre-requisites: MUSC 3082 Minimum grade C and MUSC 3090 Minimum grade: C. Prerequisites: MUSC 3071 Minimum Grade: C and MUSC 3082 Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 3103. Instrumental Music,Secondary. Designed to provide future band directors with the foundationsand principles for teaching instrumental music in the secondary school. (3-4-3) Pre-requisites: MUSC 3071 Minimum grade: C and MUSC 3082 Minimum grade: C and MUSC 3090 Minimum grade: C. Prerequisites: MUSC 3071 Minimum Grade: C and MUSC 3082 Minimum Grade: C

MUSC 3120. Small Ensemble. An advanced auditioned chamber ensemble performance experience in brass, woodwind and percussion instruments. Especially geared towards music majors as an introduction to instrumental literature above the level of the Concert Band. (2-0-1)

MUSC 3155. Mus Hist Ancient to Baroque. A study of music from ancient Greek and early Christian music to the end of the Baroque period. (3-0-3) Pre-requisite: MUSC 1201 Minimum grade: C.

MUSC 3165. Mus Hist - Classic to Modern. A study of music from the Classical period to present day. (3-0-3) Pre-requisites: MUSC 1201 Minimum grade C and MUSC 3155 Minimum grade: C.

MUSC 3180. History - Multicultural. Designed to offer an introduction to music other than that developed from the European tertian harmonic (major/minor) tradition including an examination of the music, instruments, and cultures of India, the Middle East, Greece, China, Japan, Indonesia, Africa, Latin America, and the North American Indian and African American. (2-0-2) Pre-requisite: MUSC 1201 Minimum grade: C.

MUSC 3190. Music History: American Music. American Music is a course designed to study the development of music in the United States. The focus will be on both the vernacular traditions including hymn singing, country music, jazz, blues, big band, and rock, as well as the cultivated traditions of Art music from William Billings to John Cage. 3-0-3

MUSC 3200. Brass Techniques. Acquaints students with the performance fundamentals and teaching methods for brass instruments. (2-0-1) Pre-requisite: MUSC 1201 Minimum grade: C.

MUSC 3204. Adv Harmony. Application of principle and techniques acquired in MUSC 1201, 1202, 2203 with examination of late 19th and 20th Century harmonic techniques and a continuation of harmonic and formal analysis and applications of counterpoint. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MUSC 2203 Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 3210. Woodwind Techniques. Concentrates on the performance fundamentals and teaching methods for woodwind instruments. (2-0-1) Pre-requisite: MUSC 1201 Minimum grade: C.

MUSC 3220. String Techniques. Designed to provide techniques for performance and methods of teaching stringed instruments (violin family). (2-0-1) Pre-requisite: MUSC 1201 Minimum grade: C.

MUSC 3230. Percussion Techniques. Provides students with the techniques for performance and methods of teaching percussion instruments. (2-1-0) Pre-requisite: MUSC 1201 Minimum grade: C.

MUSC 3250. Voice Techniques. Designed to study voice and basic principles of its use, including vocal techniques for individual and group performance. Basic techniques of vocal pedagogy are emphasized. (2-0-2). Pre-requisite: MUSC 1201 Minimum grade: C.

MUSC 3300. Choral Conducting. Provides students with basic skills in choral conducting including hand and baton techniques, score study, rehearsal techniques and performance practices. (2-0-1) Pre-requisites: MUSC 2400 Minimum grade C and MUSC 2090. Taken concurrently with MUSC 2090. Prerequisites: MUSC 2400 Minimum Grade: C and MUSC 2090 

MUSC 3310. Instrumental Conducting. Develops basic skills in instrumental conducting, including hand and baton techniques, score study, rehearsal techniques and performance practices. (2-0-1). Pre-requisites: MUSC 2400 Minimum grade C. Taken concurrently with MUSC 2080. Prerequisites: MUSC 2400 Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 3400. Junior Recital. Taken concurrently with MUSC 352 or MUSC 372 Applied Music. Student will work with Applied Music Instructor and Accompanist in preparation for 20-30 minute recital program. (1-0-1)

MUSC 351A. Flute. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351B. Oboe. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351C. Clarinet. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351D. Clarinet Bass. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351E. Bassoon. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351F. Saxophone Alto. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351G. Saxophone Tenor. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351H. Trumpet. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351I. French Horn. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351J. Trombone. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351K. Euphonium. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351L. Tuba. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351M. Percussion. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351N. Piano. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351P. Organ. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351Q. Harpsichord. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 252Q 

MUSC 351W. Voice. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351X. Guitar. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 272X Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 351Y. String Bass. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 352A. Flute. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351A Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352B. Oboe. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351B Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352C. Clarinet. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351C Minimum Grade: C MUS 351C Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352D. Clarinet Bass. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351D Minimum Grade: C or MUS 351D Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352E. Bassoon. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351E Minimum Grade: C or MUS 351B Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352F. Saxophone Alto. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351F Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352G. Saxophone Tenor. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351G Minimum Grade: C or MUS 351O Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352H. Trumpet. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351H Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352I. French Horn. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351I Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352J. Trombone. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351J Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352K. Euphonium. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351K Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352L. Tuba. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351L Minimum Grade: C or MUS 351S Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352M. Percussion. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351M Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352N. Piano. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351N Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352NH. Piano-Honors. Prerequisites: MUSC 351N Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352P. Organ. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 352Q. Harpsichord. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351Q Minimum Grade: C or MUS 351Y Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352R. Trumpet. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 352W. Voice. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351W Minimum Grade: C or MUS 351W Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352X. Guitar. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351X Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 352Y. String Bass. Junior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 351Y Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 371A. Flute. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 272A 

MUSC 371B. Oboe. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371C. Clarinet. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371D. Clarinet Bass. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371E. Bassoon. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371F. Saxophone Alto. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371G. Saxophone Tenor. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371H. Trumpet. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371I. French Horn. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371J. Trombone. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371K. Euphonium. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371L. Tuba. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371M. Percussion. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371N. Piano. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371P. Organ. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371Q. Harpsichord. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371W. Voice. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371X. Guitar. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 352X Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 372A. Flute. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371A or MUS 371A 

MUSC 372B. Oboe. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371B or MUS 371B 

MUSC 372C. Clarinet. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371C or MUS 371C 

MUSC 372D. Clarinet Bass. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371D or MUS 371D 

MUSC 372E. Bassoon. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371E or MUSC 371E 

MUSC 372F. Saxophone Alto. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371F or MUS 371F 

MUSC 372G. Saxophone Tenor. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371G or MUS 371G 

MUSC 372H. Trumpet. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371H 

MUSC 372I. French Horn. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371I or MUS 371I 

MUSC 372J. Trombone. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371J Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 372K. Euphonium. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371K or MUS 371K 

MUSC 372L. Tuba. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371L or MUS 371L 

MUSC 372M. Percussion. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371M or MUS 371M 

MUSC 372N. Piano. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371N or MUS 371N 

MUSC 372P. Organ. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371P Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 372Q. Harpsichord. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371Q or MUS 371Q 

MUSC 372W. Voice. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371W 

MUSC 372X. Guitar. Junior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 371X Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 4150. Diction for Singers. The study of principles and application of English, Italian, French, and German diction in singing through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet, spoken language drill, and student and performance of representative song literature. (2-0-2). Pre-requisite: MUSC 1201 Minimum grade: C.

MUSC 451A. Flute. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451B. Oboe. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451C. Clarinet. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451D. Clarinet Bass. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451E. Bassoon. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451F. Saxophone Alto. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451G. Saxophone Tenor. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451H. Trumpet. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451I. French Horn. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451J. Trombone. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451K. Euphonium. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451L. Tuba. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451M. Percussion. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451N. Piano. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451P. Organ. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 352P 

MUSC 451Q. Harpsichord. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451W. Voice. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451X. Guitar. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 372X Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 451Y. String Bass. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 452A. Flute. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451A 

MUSC 452B. Oboe. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451B or MUS 451B 

MUSC 452C. Clarinet. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451C or MUS 451C 

MUSC 452D. Clarinet Bass. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451D or MUS 451D 

MUSC 452E. Bassoon. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451E 

MUSC 452F. Saxophone Alto. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451F or MUS 451F 

MUSC 452G. Saxophone Tenor. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451G or MUS 451G 

MUSC 452H. Trumpet. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451H 

MUSC 452I. French Horn. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451I Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 452J. Trombone. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451J or MUS 451J 

MUSC 452K. Euphonium. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451K 

MUSC 452L. Tuba. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451L or MUS 451L 

MUSC 452M. Percussion. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451M or MUS 451M 

MUSC 452N. Piano. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451N or MUS 451N 

MUSC 452P. Organ. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451P or MUS 451P 

MUSC 452Q. Harpsichord. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451Q or MUS 451Q 

MUSC 452W. Voice. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451W or MUS 451W 

MUSC 452X. Guitar. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451X Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 452Y. String Bass. Senior music majors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 451Y Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 453L. Tuba.

MUSC 471A. Flute. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471B. Oboe. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471C. Clarinet. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471D. Clarinet Bass. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471E. Bassoon. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471F. Saxophone Alto. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471G. Saxophone Tenor. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471H. Trumpet. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 372H 

MUSC 471I. French Horn. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471J. Trombone. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 372J 

MUSC 471K. Euphonium. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471L. Tuba. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471M. Percussion. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471N. Piano. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471P. Organ. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471Q. Harpsichord. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471W. Voice. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471X. Guitar. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 452X Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 472A. Flute. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471A or MUS 471A 

MUSC 472B. Oboe. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471B or MUS 471B 

MUSC 472C. Clarinet. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471C or MUS 471C 

MUSC 472D. Clarinet Bass. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471D 

MUSC 472E. Bassoon. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471E or MUS 471E 

MUSC 472F. Saxophone Alto. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471F or MUS 471F 

MUSC 472G. Saxophone Tenor. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471G or MUS 471G 

MUSC 472H. Trumpet. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471H or MUS 471H 

MUSC 472I. French Horn. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471I or MUS 471I 

MUSC 472J. Trombone. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471J or MUS 471J 

MUSC 472K. Euphonium. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471K or MUS 451K 

MUSC 472L. Tuba. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471L or MUS 471L 

MUSC 472M. Percussion. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471M or MUS 471M 

MUSC 472N. Piano. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471N or MUS 371N 

MUSC 472P. Organ. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471P or MUS 471P 

MUSC 472Q. Harpsichord. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471Q or MUS 471Q 

MUSC 472W. Voice. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471W Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 472X. Guitar. Senior music minors only. Lab fee required. Must register for Band or Choir. (0-1-1) Prerequisites: MUSC 471X Minimum Grade: C 

MUSC 4800. Senior Recital. Taken concurrently with MUSC 452 or MUSC 472 Applied Music. Student will work with Applied Music Instructor and Accompanist in preparation for a 40-50 minute recital program. (1-0-1)

MUSC 4900. Special Topics in Music. A variable credit course on selected issues, topics, and literature in music. (1-2 lecture, 0 lab, 1-2 credits) Pre-requisite: Permission of instructor.

MUSC 4900S. Special Topics-Study Abroad. A variable credit course on selected issues, topics, and literature in music. Taken as part of a study abroad program. (1-3 lecture, 0 lab, 1-2 credits). Pre-requisite: Permission of the instructor

Nursing

NURS 2600. Concepts of Prof Nursing. This is a foundation course upon which subsequent nursing courses are built. Nursing as a profession, changes occurring over the years, current factors influencing nursing and health care, and nursing roles are the major topics of focus. Concepts and principles basic to nursing as a profession and concepts of health care are explored. (2-0-2) Prerequisites: Pre-Nursing. Corequisites: None.

NURS 2700. Clinical Therapeutics. NURS 2700 is a beginning nursing course in which basic physiological functioning of major biological systems, adaptive responses, and deviations in normal functions are studied. Application of the nursing process to maintain health and in response to selected disruptions, with emphasis on scientifically based interventions and skills necessary for providing care to diverse client populations. Professional standards of care, ethical and legal responsibilities of the nurse when carrying out interventions and/or skills are reviewed. Use of the nursing process and skills learned in this course are reinforced and expanded throughout the curriculum. (3-3-4) Prerequisite: BIOL 2030 or BIOL 2040 Corequisite: PSYC 2103 Prerequisites: ( PSYC 2103 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 2030 or BIOL 2040 ) 

NURS 2700L. Clinical Therapeutics Lab. (0-3-0)

NURS 3005. Human Pathophysiology. A study of the physiological changes and states associated with disease. (3-0-3) Corequisites: None. Prerequisites: ( BIOL 2030 Minimum Grade: C and BIOL 2040 Minimum Grade: C ) 

NURS 3010. Prof Nurs Practice for RNs. This is an online course that is directed to the RN student returning to school for a baccalaureate degree in nursing. This is an introductory course to the BSN curriculum that examines concepts and perspectives in contemporary nursing. The content builds on the RN's prior experience and nursing education. Examples of content include ethical principles, health care economics, legislative process, nursing theories, health & wellness, critical thinking, current trends & issues in nursing. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Must be a licensed professional nurse. Corequisite: None.

NURS 3050. Health Promotion. This course is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge and skills needed to provide health promotion and disease prevention interventions, essential components of comprehensive health care. The course includes content on health promotion, risk reduction, and disease prevention strategies across the life span, with emphasis on application to rural clients; health behavior models and theories; change theories, health education principles, theories, and strategies. (2-0-2) Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.

NURS 3050H. Health Promotion - Honors. This course is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge and skills needed to provide health promotion and disease prevention interventions, essential components of comprehensive health care. The course includes content on health promotion, risk reduction, and disease prevention strategies across the life span, with emphasis on application to rural clients; health behavior models and theories; change theories; health education principles, theories, and strategies. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (2-0-2) Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.

NURS 3100. Nursing of Adults I. Illnesses common in the adult population are explored, especially as presented in the acute care setting. Emphasis is on identification, treatment, and/or resolution of acute and long term health problems. Health promotion and disease prevention as they apply to specific disease entities are also discussed. The influence of genetics, alternative or cultural health practices, and application of nursing care in the community are reviewed as they relate to specific illnesses as well as collaborative care with other health care professionals. Must be accepted to the Nursing Program. (4-6-6) Corequisites: NURS 3050, NURS 3200, and NURS 3630. Prerequisites: ( NURS 2600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 2700 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 3005 Minimum Grade: C ) 

NURS 3100L. Nursing of Adults I Lab. (0-6-0) Prerequisites: ( NURS 2600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 2700 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 3005 Minimum Grade: C ) 

NURS 3200. Health Assessment. Assessment skills for clients across the life span are presented for the purpose of determining health status. Theory and skills necessary to obtain a comprehensive health history and complete physical examination are emphasized. Assessment skills in conducting an interview for the purpose of nutritional, cultural, and family pedigree information are incorporated. Special assessment techniques unique to children, older adults, and clients with functional disabilities are included. Physical findings indicating genetic disorders are also introduced. (3-2-4) Corequisites: NURS 3050, NURS 3100, and NURS 3630. Prerequisites: ( NURS 2600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 2700 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 3005 Minimum Grade: C ) 

NURS 3200L. Health Assessment Lab. (0-2-0) Prerequisites: ( NURS 2600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 2700 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 3005 Minimum Grade: C ) 

NURS 3290. Int'l Health Care Delivery Sys. This course compares the health care delivery systems of the United States and one European Union country and one Latin American country. An elective course. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.

NURS 3500. Ethical Issues in Health Care. An exploration of contemporary ethical issues in health care delivery in light of various models of moral thought. Ethical decision-making models are used to analyze issues such as rationing of health care, abortion, euthanasia, surrogate motherhood, genetic engineering, and rights of subjects of research and experimentation. An elective course. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.

NURS 3600S. Transcultural HealthCare-St Ab.

NURS 3630. Pharmacology I. This course addresses the principles of nursing management in drug therapy, the basics of core drug knowledge, and patient-related variables. Nursing management of the patient's response to medication is discussed according to various body systems, pathological conditions, and major drug classifications. (2-0-2) Corequisites: NURS 3050, NURS 3100, and NURS 3200. Prerequisites: ( NURS 2600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 2700 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 3005 Minimum Grade: C ) 

NURS 3750. Nursing of the Family. Focuses on a family-centered approach to meeting health needs during the childbearing and childrearing years. (6-9-9) Corequisites: None. Prerequisites: ( NURS 3100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 3200 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 3630 Minimum Grade: C ) 

NURS 3750H. Nursing of the Family-Honors. Focuses on a family-centered approach to meeting health needs during the childbearing and childrearing years. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (6-9-9) Corequisites: None. Prerequisites: ( NURS 3100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 3200 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 3630 Minimum Grade: C ) 

NURS 3750L. Nursing of Family Lab I & II. (0-9-0) Prerequisites: ( NURS 3100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 3200 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 3630 Minimum Grade: C ) 

NURS 3770. Issues in Adolescence. An exploration of the contemporary health, health care, and related issues of concern to professionals who work with adolescent populations. This course is an elective course. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.

NURS 3850. Gerontological Nursing. An exploration of the physiological and psychological changes that are common to the aging adult. Content includes theories of aging, issues related to healthy aging, illness, pharmacology, nutrition, sexuality, ethical/legal situations and sociocultural influences. (3-0-3) Corequisites: None. Prerequisites: ( NURS 3100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 3200 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 3630 Minimum Grade: C ) 

NURS 4010. Leadership in Nursing. Selected principles of leadership and management as they relate to health care delivery and to specific nursing service roles in which nurses function. Includes content on leadership roles, management theories, components of effective management, organizational dynamics, political and economic context of health care, and career development strategies. Students must complete all 3XXX nursing courses with a minimum grade of C prior to the stated prerequisite. (3-0-3) Corequisites: NURS 4100. Prerequisites: NURS 3850 Minimum Grade: C 

NURS 4080. Special Topic in Leadership. Students must complete all 3XXX nursing courses with a minimum grade of C prior to the stated prerequisite. (3-0-3) Corequisites: None. Prerequisites: NURS 3850 Minimum Grade: C 

NURS 4100. Nursing of Adults II. A study of complex diseases in the adult population. Emphasis is on promotion and maintenance of health and prevention of disability in clients with acute, critical, and long-term health problems. Students must complete all 3XXX nursing courses with a minimum grade of C prior to the stated prerequisite. (3-6-5) Corequisites: NURS 4010 and NURS 4630. Prerequisites: NURS 3850 Minimum Grade: C 

NURS 4100L. Nursing of Adults II Lab. (0-6-0) Prerequisites: NURS 3850 Minimum Grade: C 

NURS 4200. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurs. The course acquaints the beginning practitioner with the essential concepts of mental health and mental illness and builds on the student's knowledge of normal patterns of behavior, personality development, and defense mechanisms. The focus is on the use of the nursing process in caring for clients exhibiting emotional disorders and maladaptive behaviors. Therapeutic communication skills are integrated and practiced throughout the course. Students must complete all 3XXX nursing courses with a minimum grade of C prior to the stated prerequisite. (3-6-5) Corequisite: NURS 4630. Prerequisites: NURS 3850 Minimum Grade: C 

NURS 4200L. Psych-Mental Health Nurs Lab. (0-6-0) Prerequisites: NURS 3850 Minimum Grade: C

NURS 4400. Community Health Nursing. A course designed to aid the baccalaureate nursing student in developing skills essential to population-based practice. This course requires the student to integrate prior knowledge and skills from maternal child health nursing, medical/surgical nursing, and mental health nursing with concepts of primary care in order to promote and maintain health and prevent disease. Emphasis will be on conducting community assessments, planning and implementing appropriate interventions based on assessment finding, presenting health data to groups, facilitating the development of community coalitions, and collaborating with community partners for effective change in health policy. Students must complete all 3XXX nursing courses with a minimum grade of C prior to the stated prerequisites. (3-6-5) Corequisites: None. Prerequisites: ( NURS 3850 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 4100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 4200 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 4630 Minimum Grade: C ) 

NURS 4400L. Community Health Nursing Lab. (0-6-0) Prerequisites: ( NURS 3850 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 4100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 4200 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 4630 Minimum Grade: C ) 

NURS 4450. Pop Foc Prac in PHN for RNs. An online course designed to aid the nurse in developing and/or revitalizing skills essential to population-based practice in conjunction with clinical/prevention skills already obtained in the workforce. Emphasis will be on conducting community assessments, planning and implementing appropriate interventions based on assessment findings, presenting health data to groups, facilitating the development of community coalitions, and collaborating with community partners for effective change in health policy. Must be a licensed registered professional nurse. Students must complete all 3XXX nursing courses with a minimum grade of C prior to the stated prerequisite. (4-0-4) Corequisite: None. Prerequisites: NURS 3850 Minimum Grade: C 

NURS 4460. Dir Study Com Health Nurs RNs. This course is designed to supplement the online Population Health Nursing course. Other types of community based nursing, such as school health, occupational health, hospice, and prison health are explored. Students can choose to complete their population health project in public health or in any of the above listed areas. Must be a licensed registered professional nurse. Students must complete all 3XXX nursing courses with a minimum grade of C prior to the stated prerequisite. (0-3-1) Corequisite: None. Prerequisites: NURS 3850 Minimum Grade: C 

NURS 4630. Pharmacology II. Pharmacology II is a continuation of Pharmacology I. This course facilitates the acquisition, comprehension, and application of knowledge in drug therapy. Nursing management of the patient's response to medication is discussed according to various body systems, pathological conditions, and major drug classification. Students must complete all 3XXX nursing courses with a minimum grade of C prior to the stated prerequisite. (2-0-2) Corequisite: NURS 4100. Prerequisites: NURS 3850 Minimum Grade: C 

NURS 4800. Research in Nursing. An overview of basic research concepts and process. Critical analysis of published research and evaluation for applicability to nursing practice. (3-0-3) Corequisite: None. Prerequisites: MATH 2204 Minimum Grade: C 

NURS 4900. Practicum in Nursing. Students in this clinical course develop and implement a self-directed contract encompassing their nursing education to-date. Completion of this course, under the guidance of a faculty advisor and a clinical preceptor, facilitates the student's transition to the professional nursing role. (1-9-4) Corequisites: NURS 4400 and NURS 4800, (NURS 4010-RN only). Prerequisites: ( NURS 4010 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 4100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 4200 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 4630 Minimum Grade: C ) 

NURS 4900L. Practicum Lab. (0-9-0) Prerequisites: ( NURS 4010 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 4100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 4200 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 4630 Minimum Grade: C ) 

NURS 4910. Caregiving Practicum. Course provide the student the opportunity to synthesize knowledge in the area of caregiving as well as knowledge from the social, psychological, health care, economic, legal and ethical perspective in a practicum experience that focuses on the in-dept analysis of a particular area of caregiving practice (aging, chronic illiness, disabilities, children/adults). Emphasis is on leadership and management approaches to caregiving challenges, critical analysis of caregiving research, and implementation of the caregiving specialist role in a variety of settings. Students are challenged by promoting independence in the syntheis and practice of the caregivng specialist role with family and professional caregivers (2-3-3) Prerequisites: ( PSYC 2000 Minimum Grade: C and PSYC 4395 Minimum Grade: C ) 

Physical Education

PEDS 1010. Lifetime Fitness. A course required of all students as a part of the general curriculum. The purpose of the course is to provide the student with scientific-based knowledge concerning practical application of physical fitness training and evaluation procedures while participating in a fitness program. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1020. Aerobics - Walk-Jog. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1030. Step Aerobics. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1100. Beg Swimming. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1180. Canoeing. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1230. Racquetball. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1250. Beg Tennis. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1280. Beg Golf. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1330. Weight Training. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1610. Varsity Sports I. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1620. Varsity Sports II. (0-2-1) Prerequisites: PEDS 1610 

PEDS 1630. Varsity Sports III. (0-2-1) Prerequisites: PEDS 1610 and PEDS 1620 

PEDS 1640. Varsity Sports IV. (0-2-1) Prerequisites: PEDS 1610 and PEDS 1620 and PEDS 1630 

PEDS 1700. Fundamentals of Dance. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1770. Beg Ballet. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1910. Beg Yoga. The purpose of the course is to provide the beginning students with the skills and knowledge needed to practice yoga on their own. (0-2-1)

PEDS 2000. CPR and First Aid. This course is required of all students as part of the general curriculum. The course is designed to provide every student knowledge and practical skill practice in a current first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques and HIV/AIDS education. (1-1-2)

Professional Golf Course Mgmt

PGMT 2200. Intro to Professional Golf Mgt. This course will serve as an introduction to the PGM program PGA/PGM bookwork, and the golf industry, including career paths as a whole. Students will also begin on their Level 1 PGA/PGM Materials with special consideration given to those materials that will best prepare students for their first internship experience.

PGMT 2400. Rules & Tournament Operations. This course provides an in-depth look into the golf profesional's role in tournament operations and event management. Students will gain both knowledge and experience in designing, planning and implementing successful golf tournaments and events. The Rules of Golf will also be explored in detail. Students will learn definitions, how to use and interpret the USGA Rules of Golf in both tournaments and everyday play. 3-0-3

PGMT 2600. Scientific Asp/Teach&Golf Equp. This course will serve as an introduction to the art and business of golf instruction, as well as developing golfer development programs and PGA Growth of the Game initiatives. Students will also be exposed to golf club design and repair, both from a hands-on perspective and from a business stand point. 3-0-3

PGMT 3010. PGM Seminar 1. This course provides an in-depth look into golf professional's role in golf car fleet management. Students will also gain knowledge and practical experience into developing golfer development programs, PGA "Growth of the Game" initiatives, and golf club design and repair. All areas will be explored from both a hands-on perspective and from a business stand point.

PGMT 3020. PGM Seminar II. This course provides the student's first look into the art of golf instruction. It is also designed to serve as a Level 1 checkpoint Review and to facilitate the completion of pre-seminar activities. 2-0-2

PGMT 3030. PGM Seminar III. In this course, the students begin covering the topics in the PGA's Level 2 PGA/PGM Bookwork. A more in-depth look is taken at each of the pre-seminar acticities from the previous checkpoint along with more advanced information regarding golf instruction. Special attention is given to the business specifics at a golf operation. 2-0-2

PGMT 3040. PGM Seminar IV. In this course, the students will cover the Level 2 Checkpoint Pre-Seminar Activities as well as receive an overall review on the materials covered for the Level 2 knowledge and simulation exams conducted by the PGA of America. 2-0-2

PGMT 3050. PGM Seminar V. In this course, the students will cover the most advanced PGA learning objectives from each of the "People, Business, and Game" principles. All areas will be explored from both a hands-on perspective and from a business standpoint. 2-0-2

PGMT 3060. PGM Seminar VI. In this course, Food & Beverage as it relates to the golf operation will be covered in detail providing both a knowledge pass and practical experience. This course will serve as a review for the PGA/PGM Level 3 Checkpoint as well as preparation for the PGA's Final Experience.

PGMT 4000. PGM Internship - Year 1.

Physics

PHYS 1100. Introduction to Engineering. This course will introduce the dual degree student to the nature of engineering both as methodology and as a practical career choice. The history, current state and potential future of different fields of engineering will be surveyed with the help of specific examples. A detailed discussion of the different types of practical skills and theoretical background required for a successful career in engineering will be included. Engineering Dual-Degree major required. (1-0-1)

PHYS 1111. Introduction to Physics I. Emphasizes classical mechanics, including Newton's laws, rotational motion, and oscillators; wave motion; and thermodynamics. Permission of instructor required. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: MATH 1113 Minimum Grade: D or MTH 113 Minimum Grade: D or MATH 1113H Minimum Grade: D 

PHYS 1111H. Inro to Physics I Honors.

PHYS 1112. Introduction to Physics II. Emphasizes classical electromagnetism, optics, and modern concepts, including relativity, quantum mechanics, and atomic and nuclear structure. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: ( PHYS 1111 or PHY 201 ) 

PHYS 1112H. Intro to Physics II-Honors. Emphasizes classical electromagnetism, optics, and modern concepts, including relativity, quantum mechanics, and atomic and nuclear structure. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-2-4)

PHYS 1222. Stellar Astronomy. Introductory survey course for non-science majors. Does not require GEOL 1221/PHYS 1221. The main focus of this class is to put our solar system into a broader perspective provided by the rest of the universe. The sun as a star, physical properties of stars, principles of spectroscopy as applied to astronomy, binary stars, variable stars, star clusters, gaseous nebulae, stellar motions and distribution, Milky Way and external galaxies, expanding universe, cosmic time scale. (3-0-3)

PHYS 1222H. Steller Astronomy - Honors. Introductory survey course for non-science majors. Does not require GEOL 1221/PHYS 1221. The main focus of this class is to put our solar system into a broader perspective provided by the rest of the universe. The sun as a star, physical properties of stars, principles of spectroscopy as applied to astronomy, binary stars, variable stars, star clusters, gaseous nebulae, stellar motions and distribution, Milky Way and external galaxies, expanding universe, cosmic time scale. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

PHYS 2025. Intro to Signal Processing. Introduction to signal processing for discrete-time and continuous-time signals. Topics include problems in filtering, frequency response, and applications of the Fourier transform and the Z-transform. Laboratory emphasizes computer-based signal processing. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: ( MTH 112 or MATH 1120 or MATH 1120H ) 

PHYS 2211. Principles of Physics I. Emphasizes classical mechanics, including Newton's laws, rotational motion, and oscillators; wave motion; and thermodynamics. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: ( MATH 1120 or MATH 1120H or MATH 112 or MATH 1501 ) 

PHYS 2211H. Principles of Physics I.

PHYS 2212. Principles of Physics II. Emphasizes classical electromagnetism, optics, and modern concepts, including relativity, quantum mechanics, and atomic and nuclear structure. (3-2-4) Prerequisites: ( PHYS 2211 or PHY 211 ) 

PHYS 2213. Modern Physics. This course provides the student with a survey of modern concepts in physics including wave motion, electromagnetic waves, special relativity, quantum theory and atomic structure. The student will further develop his or her analytical skills by learning and applying a wide variety of problem solving techniques. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PHYS 2212 or PHY 213 

PHYS 3322. Thermodynamics. Thermodynamic properties, energy and mass conservation, entropy and the second law. Second law analysis of thermodynamic systems, gas cycles, vapor cycles. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PHYS 2212 

Prior Learning Assessment

PLA 2000. Prior Learning Assess Document. An orientation to the university, educational options and programs at Georgia Southwestern for nontraditional students. College success and study skills are emphasized. Techniques for the development of documentation for prior learning experiences based on standards and criteria established by academic and subject matter professionals. Students prepare and submit documentation which provides a clear description of competencies obtained. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Political Science

POLS 1101. American Government. American political institutions and processes and their development over time are carefully examined in this course. A passing grade in this course satisfies the U.S. and Georgia Constitution requirements of Georgia State Code 20-3-68. (3-0-3)

POLS 1101H. American Government-Honors. American political institutions and their development. A passing grade in this course satisfies the U.S. and Georgia Constitution requirements of Georgia State Code 20-3-68. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

POLS 2101. Intro to Discipline of Pol Sci. This course is a general introduction to the scope of political science, including types of governments, the variety of institutions and processes, political concepts, and ideologies, and to the methods used to study political phenomena. Required of all political science majors. (3-0-3)

POLS 2201. State & Local Government. This course focuses on the organization, powers, functions, and political processes at the state and local levels, as well as the relationship between the state and national governments. A passing grade in this course satisfies the Georgia Constitution requirement of Goergia Code 20-3-68. (3-0-3)

POLS 2401. Intro to Global Issues. POLS 2401 Introduction to Global Issues. An examination of contemporary world issues such as environmnetal degradation, disease, war, human rights, and changes in the global economy. (3-0-3)

POLS 3200. Intro to the European Union. This course examines the development of the European Union. It is the basic course for students participating in the E.U. Certification Program. (3-0-3)

POLS 3205. Intro to Comparative Politics. This course introduces the comparative method of studying political systems, with an emphasis on institutional arrangements and political behavior found in democratic and non-democratic political systems. Transitions to democracy and political development are also examined. Case studies include political systems in various regions of the world. (3-0-3)

POLS 3210. Modern European Governments. This course entails a study of the constitutions, basic principles, governmental organizations, political party systems, and political methods of major countries in Europe. (3-0-3)

POLS 4100. Amer Pol Parties-Int Groups. This course involves a careful study of the two main types of political organizations in the United States that serve as linkages between the people and their government: political parties and interest groups. The focus is on the development of political parties and interest groups, their structure and operations, and their roles in the political system. (3-0-3)

POLS 4460. The Legislative Process. The focus of this course is the structure, functions, and powers of the U.S. Congress and the behavior and goals of its memebers. It emphasizes the composition, leadership, and procedures of the House and the Senate. Attention is also given to the role of elections, party, and views of representation. (3-0-3)

POLS 4470. American Presidency. Presidential powers, duties, and responsibilities are surveyed. Students will carefully examine historic and contemporary conceptions of the office and the presidency as an administrative institution. (3-0-3)

POLS 4570. The Structure of American Govt. This course focuses on the development of the separation of powers, checks and balances, federalism, and national and state regulatory authority as defined in the Constitution and as elaborated though Supreme Court decisions. Prior credit in American Government is recommended. (3-0-3)

POLS 4580. Civil Liberties. This course is focused on civil liberties and civil rights as given in the Constitution, especially the Bill of Rights and the Civil War Amendments, and as reflected in Supreme Court decisions. Prior credit in American Government or its equivalent is recommended. Constitutional Law I is not a prerequisite for this course. (3-0-3)

POLS 4630. International Relations. The focus of this course is the theory and practices of international relations. (3-0-3)

POLS 4690. American Foreign Policy. This course surveys U.S. foreign policy from the 18th to the 21st centuries with emphasis on the role of the international system in shaping American policies and interests. (3-0-3)

POLS 4700. Political Philosophy. In this course students examine the development of political philosophy and the perennial issues with which it is concerned through the works of such thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Marx. (3-0-3)

POLS 4730. Religion and Politics. This course surveys the interaction of religion in U.S. politics and political behavior from the early colonial period through the contemporary political scene. (3-0-3)

POLS 4760. American Political Thought. This course entails an examination of the basic ideas about man and government that have formed the basis for political practice and debate within the United States. Schools and trends of thought from the colonial era to contemporary times will be explored. (3-0-3)

POLS 4900. Special Topics in Pol Sci. This course focuses on selected issues, problems, and literature in political science. A student must get the permission of the Department Chair. (3-0-3)

POLS 4920. Political Science Internship. Internships with government agencies are available for qualified students. See the Coordinator of Intern Programs for information. (3-0-3)

POLS 4950. Senior Research. Required of all political science majors, this capstone research course requires students to integrate the basic concepts, methods, and sub-fields of political science, and to relate these to the contemporary world. It further develops skills in research and communications. A student must have earned a grade of C or better in at least 15 hours of upper division political science. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: POLS 3205 Minimum Grade: D and ( POLS 4630 Minimum Grade: D or POL 463 Minimum Grade: D ) and ( POLS 4700 Minimum Grade: D or POL 470 Minimum Grade: D ) 

Psychology

PSYC 1101. Introduction to Psychology. A survey of the scientific discipline of psychology, including the approach used to address key issues. Emphasis is placed on heredity, environment, emotions, motives, learning and intelligence as related to individual differences. This course serves as a prerequisite for advanced courses in psychology. (3-0-3)

PSYC 1101H. Intro to Psychology-Honors. A survey of the scientific discipline of psychology, including the approach used to address key issues. Emphasis is placed on heredity, environment, emotions, motives, learning and intelligence as related to individual differences. This course serves as a prerequisite for advanced courses in psychology. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

PSYC 1102. Psy as a Natural Science. An introduction to modern scientific psychology with emphasis upon historical and methodological foundations. Scientific principles of sensation and perception, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, intelligence and personality, abnormal behavior, health, mating, families, social behavior, and culture will be examined. (3-0-3)

PSYC 1102H. Psyc as Natural Sci- HONORS. An introduction to modern scientific psychology with emphasis upon historical and methodological foundations. Scientific principles of sensation and perception, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, intelligence and personality, abnormal behavior, health, mating, families, social behavior, and culture will be examined. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

PSYC 2000. Interdiscip App in Caregiving. A multidisciplinary approach to caregiving is utilized to provide the student with information regarding caregivers and the vital role(s) they play in providing health care. This course seeks to educate current and potential professional caregivers to better meet the needs of the rapidly rising family and community caregiver populations. (3-0-3)

PSYC 2103. Human Growth-Development. The study of human development throughout the lifespan, including key events and changes in physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional functioning. (3-0-3)

PSYC 2103H. Human Growth-Dev-Honors. The study of human development throughout the lifespan, including key events and changes in physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional functioning. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

PSYC 2103S. Hum Growth & Dev-Study Abroad. The study of human development throughout the lifespan, including key events and changes in physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional functioning (3-0-3) Taken as part of a study abroad experience.

PSYC 3301. Psychological Statistics. An introduction to the basic principles of descriptive and inferential statistics. The course emphasizes the application of statistical methods and research designs found commonly in the social sciences. May substitute SOCI 3331. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3308. Psycho Aspects of Aging. A thorough discussion of human aging, focusing on the physiological and psychosocial aspects of aging, as well as a historical and contemporary examination of the various psychological and sociological aspects of death and dying. May substitute SOCI 3308. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( PSYC 1101 or PSY 101 ) or PSYC 1101H or ( SOCI 1101 or SOCI 202 or SOCI 1101H ) 

PSYC 3309. Human Sexuality. A thorough discussion of human sexuality, focusing on the psychological, social, anthropological, and physiological aspects of sexual expression. The treatment of sexual problems, therapies, and deviancy are addressed along with myths and realities. May substitute SOCI 3309. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H or SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1101H or PSY 101 or SOC 202 

PSYC 3309H. Human Sexuality- Honors. A thorough discussion of human sexuality, focusing on the psychological, social, anthropological, and physiological aspects of sexual expression. The treatment of sexual problems, therapies, and deviancy are addressed along with myths and realities. May substitute SOCI 3309. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3311. Social Psychology. The scientific study of how people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by both the real and imagined presence of others. Topics include such subjects as social influence, attitudes, social cognition, interpersonal attracation and prejudice. May substitute SOCI 3311. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 

PSYC 3320. Child Psychology. An explanation of the typical and atypical development of children in physical, cognitive, and socioemotional areas, with an emphasis on the scientific study of child development and the application of psychological principles to understanding and enhancing the development of children. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 

PSYC 3331. Intro Psychological Testing. Theory of psychological measurement, types and characteristics of tests, methods for evaluating tests, and review of some of the more commonly used psychological tests. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H or PSY 101 

PSYC 3337. Theories of Personal Relations. A survey of the major theories and research findings regarding personal relationships. The topics of interpersonal atttraction, liking, loving, romance, communication, and therapeutic interventions will be covered. Productive and non-productive human interactions are differentiated. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H or PSY 101 

PSYC 3337H. Thry of Personal Rel- HONORS. A survey of the major theories and research findings regarding personal relationships. The topics of interpersonal atttraction, liking, loving, romance, communication, and therapeutic interventions will be covered. Productive and non-productive human interactions are differentiated. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3338. Sport Psychology. A survey of the science of sport psychology in which the principles of psychology are applied in a sport setting. The course will explore the enhancement of both athletic performance and the social-psychological aspects of human enrichment through sport. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H or PSY 101 

PSYC 3340. Mass Media Influences. An examination of the forces of the modern mass media, including film, music, radio, books, magazines, and the internet, with emphasis upon television, and how they influence the psychosocial development of the individual and normative political and social behavior. May substitute SOCI 3340. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 or SOCI 1101 (3-0-3). Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H or PSY 101 or SOCI 202 or SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1101H 

PSYC 3350. Health Psychology. A survey course dealing with how environmental, social, and individual behaviors influence physical health. The interaction of society and psychology is emphasized and specific health problems are discussed such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and HIV/AIDS. Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 Minimum Grade: C or PSYC 1101H Minimum Grade: C or PSY 101 Minimum Grade: C 

PSYC 3365. Biopsychology. A survey of the relationship between the behavior of organisms and the biological processes mediating the behavior. The emphasis is on the physiological, neurochemical and evolutionary aspects of motivation, emotion, and learning. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 ) or PSY 101 or PSYC 1101H 

PSYC 3365H. Biopsychology-Hnr. A survey of the relationship between the behavior of organisms and the biological processes mediating the behavior. The emphasis is on the physiological, neurochemical and evolutionary aspects of motivation, emotion, and learning. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3380. Sensation and Perception. Consideration of the way in which stimuli in our world, such as light and sound, act on the human sensory systems and how the brain transforms raw sensory information into meaningful perceptions. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H or PSY 101 

PSYC 4395. Theo-Rsrch in Caregiving. A research-based discussion of key issues in the study of caregiving, including similarities and differences among caregiving populations, cultural influences on caregiving, and the interplay between professional and family caregivers. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H and PSYC 2000 

PSYC 4401. Abnormal Psychology. A survey course of all the major disorders, their symptoms and theories regarding how each disorder originates, and evidence-based treatments. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSY 101 or PSYC 1101H 

PSYC 4402. Prin of Behavior Modification. A survey of learning theory and principles applicable to the modification of human maladaptive behavior. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSY 101 or PSYC 1101H 

PSYC 4403H. Soc-Psy Aspects Addict- Hnr.

PSYC 4404. Industrial/Organizational Psyc. A survey of psychological principles and practice related to personnel selection, training decisions, and design of the workplace. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSY 101 or PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H 

PSYC 4405. Theo and Tech of Counseling. A general introduction to major theories and techniques of counseling and their applicability to various kinds of clientele. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( PSYC 1101 or PSY 101 or PSYC 1101H ) 

PSYC 4405H. Theo and Tech Counsel - Hnrs. A general introduction to various theories and techniques of counseling and their applicability to various kinds of clientele. Must have 10 hours of Psychology courses and permission of the instructor or Assistant Dean. This course is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

PSYC 4407. Theories of Learning. The principles of classical and operant conditioning as related to animal and human behavior and cognition will be covered. Contemporary research on learning, memory, language, and thinking will be incorporated along with research related to classic learning principles. Content provides an excellent background for further coursework in psychology, sociology, social work, education, and similar areas of study. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSY 101 or PSYC 1101H 

PSYC 4410. Cognitive Psychology. A survey of information processing approaches to understanding the mind that includes perception, attention, memory, language, and problem solving. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H or PSY 101 

PSYC 4411. History-Systems of Psychology. A survey of the philosophical origins and methodological developments of the science of psychology, including its various systems and/or schools of thought and the current status of each. Major theorists and their theories are presented in the development of the history of the discipline. Must have permission of instructor. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H or PSY 101 

PSYC 4414. Psychology of Language. An examination of contemporary theories and studies of language comprehension, speech production, neurocognition, language development, and language disorders. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSY 101 or PSYC 1101H 

PSYC 4418. AFFIRMING DIVERSITY IN PSYCHOL. A survey course covering a number of diverse populations, focused on a general rubric for thinking about various groups and their treatment in health, education, and the workplace. Ethical and legal issues are included. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSY 101 or ( PSYC 1101 ) 

PSYC 4422. Theories of Personality. A survey of the most important theories of personality. Emphasis is placed upon experimental validation and the implications of the theories for psychology and other . disciplines. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H or PSY 101 

PSYC 4431. Experimental Psychology. A study of the rationale of experimentation and techniques for the isolation and measurement of variables. Laboratory experience is provided in the construction, excution, and interpretation of scientific experiments on behavior. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( PSY 101 or PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H ) and ( PSY 301 or PSYC 3301 ) or ( SOCI 3331 or SOC 331 ) 

PSYC 4450. Seminar in Psychology. A capstone course focusing on in-depth discussion of major issues and schools of thought in psychology. The intent is to provide review and closure for psychology majors by demonstrating the interrelatedness of different areas of psychology and their relevance for affecting and explaining different social phenomena. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H or PSY 101 

PSYC 4492. Psychology Internship. A field experience course in which the student completes responsibilities in a selected human services agency. Designed to provide the student with practical exposure to relevant career fields. Must have permission of advisor and Assistant Dean. (0-0-3)

PSYC 4497. Senior Research I. Independent study projects in Psychology ... requires permission of instructor.

PSYC 4498. Senior Research II. A three-hour course in basic research requiring the student to specify a problem, review the relevant literature, and collect and analyze data for summary presentation in journal form. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( PSYC 3301 or PSY 301 ) and ( PSYC 431 or PSYC 4431 ) 

PSYC 449A. Special Topics in Psychology. A course on selected issues, problems, and literature in Psychology. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSY 101 or PSYC 1101H 

Reading

READ 0099. Learning Support Reading II. A course designed to assist students who have completed the basic in Developmental Studies Reading I but who failed to perform satisfactorily on the University System's placement/ exit test to increase reading levels and successfully pass the exit test. Laboratory work is required. Must pass Developmental Studies Reading I with a grade of S (Satisfactory). (4-2-4) Prerequisites: ( READ 0098 Minimum Grade: S or DRG 096 Minimum Grade: S ) 

READ 1000. Improvement of Learning. An Academic Assistance course designed to aid the student in the development of effective learning techniques. Emphasis is given to reading speed, comprehension, vocabulary, listening and note taking as these skills apply to university level courses the student is presently taking. (2-1-1)

Regents' Writing Skills

RGTE 0199. Regents' Writing Skills. The Regents' Writing Skills course is intended to ensure that all graduates of USG institutions possess certain minimum skills in writing. Students learn to evaluate their own writing strengths and weaknesses and work on improving their writing skills so they are able to write an essay meeting the Regents' criteria. (3-1-3)

Regents' Reading Skills

RGTR 0198. Regents' Reading Skills. The Regents' Reading Skills course is intended to ensure that all graduates of USG institutions possess certain minimum skills in reading comprehension. Students work on improving their comprehension of material drawn from a variety of subject areas (social science, natural science and humanities) with various modes of discourse (exposition, narration and argumentation). Critical thinking and the following four major aspects of reading are emphasized: vocabulary in context, inferential and literal comprehension and analysis. (3-1-3)

Sociology

SOCI 1101. Introduction to Sociology. A general analysis of human social behavior, culture, social groups, and social institutions. (3-0-3)

SOCI 1101H. Intro to Sociology-Honors. A general analysis of human social behavior, culture, social groups, and social institutions. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

SOCI 1160. Contemporary Social Problems. In this course a limited number of current social problems are selected for in-depth analysis. The student is introduced to a sociological approach that examines the structures and processes that contribute to "problems." Each problem is also examined for societal changes that might ameliorate the identified conditions. Several theoretical approaches are utilized. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOC 202 

SOCI 1160S. Cont Social Prob-Study Abroad. In this course a limited number of current social problems are selected for in-depth analysis. The student is introduced to a sociological approach that examines the structures and processes that contribute to "problems." Each problem is also examined for societal changes that might ameliorate the identified conditions. Several theoretical approaches are utilized. Taken as a study abroad experience. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 

SOCI 2293. Sociology of Family. An in-depth analysis of the American family with cross- cultural and historical comparisons. Emphasis is placed on the various changes occurring within the American family. (3-0-3)

SOCI 2293H. Sociology of Family.

SOCI 2295. American Mosaic. A study of the culture of the U.S. from the perspective of ethnic identity, ethnic relations, sex and gender and socio- economic class. Emphasis will be placed on the use of anthropological and sociological methods and approaches to enhance understanding of contemporary socio-cultural lifeways. (2-0-2)

SOCI 3308. Psychosocial Aspects of Aging. A thorough discussion of human aging, focusing on the physiological and psychosocial aspects of aging, as well as a historical and contemporary examination of the various psychological and sociological aspects of death and dying. May require consent of instructor or meet pre-requisites. May substitute PSYC 3308. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H or SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1101H or PSY 101 or SOC 202 

SOCI 3309. Human Sexuality. A thorough discussion of human sexuality, focusing on the psychological, social, anthropological, and physiologi- cal aspects of human sexuality and with treatment of sexual problems, therapies, and deviance. May Substitute PSYC 3309. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSY 101 or PSYC 1101H or ( SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1101H or SOC 202 ) 

SOCI 3318. Sociology of Religion. An examination of classical and contemporary sociological theory and method as applied in analysis of religion. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: SOC 202 or SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1101H 

SOCI 3325. Introduction to Social Work. A survey of the field of social work. Content includes an examination of social work concepts, values, and ideology; origin and history; methods of practice; practice settings; and current issues in the delivery of social services. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1101H or SOC 202 

SOCI 3331. Sociological Statistics. An introduction to the basic principles of descriptive and inferential statistics. The course emphasizes a non- mathematical approach to the theory of statistics and the application of statistical methods and research designs found commonly in the social sciences. May substitute PSYC 3301. Prerequisite: SOCI 1101. (3-0-3)

SOCI 3340. Mass Media Influences. An examination of the forces of the modern mass media, including film, music, radio, books, magazines, and the internet, with emphasis upon television, and how they influence the psychosocial development of the individual and normative political and social behavior. May substitute PSYC 3340. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H or SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1101H or PSY 101 or SOC 202 

SOCI 3350. Criminology. A study of the legal and social aspects of crime. The making of laws, the breaking of laws, and the sanctioning of law violators are examined. Police, courts, and prevention are included as critical aspects of understanding crime. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOC 202 or SOCI 1101H 

SOCI 4403. Psychosocial Aspects of Addict. This course includes a thorough consideration of genetic, biological, pharmacological, sociological, and psychological aspects of addiction to legal and illegal drugs. In addition to questions of causation, treatment, and prevention strategies are discussed and observed. Upper division standing required. May substitute PSYC 4403. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H or PSY 101 or SOC 202 or SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1101H 

SOCI 4411. Race and Minority Relations. An analysis of the development of minority group relations in the United States, with emphasis on black-white relationships in the South. Prerequisite: SOCI 2293 or permission of instructor. (3-0-3)

SOCI 4417. Women in Society. An analysis of women in the United States emphasizing historical and contemporary relationships of women to education, religion, law, politics, employment, family, and sexuality. Must have permission of instructor or meet pre-requisites. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: SOC 202 or SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1101H 

SOCI 4420. Development of Social Theory. A comprehensive survey of classical sociological thought emphasizing the major theorists of each period. Upper division standing required. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1101H or SOC 202 

SOCI 4420H. Dev of Social Theory-Honors. A comprehensive survey of classical sociological thought emphasizing the major theorists of each period. Upper division standing required. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

SOCI 4440. Methods of Social Research. A comprehensive study of the various methods of social research design and technique, including a directed application. Upper division standing required. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1101H or SOC 202 ) 

SOCI 4445. Deviant Social Behavior. A review of the history and research in the area of deviant behavior. The social basis of definitions, theories. and treatment of deviant social behavior will be examined. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: SOC 202 or SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1101H 

SOCI 4450. Seminar in Sociology. A critical examination of historical and contemporary sociological thought. Topics include the development of major sociological theoretical schools-- including functionalism, conflict theory, modern systems theory, symbolic interactionist theory and ethnomethodology, postmodern social theory, feminist theory, neo-Marxism, and neo-functionalism and major developments in sociological methods and practice. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOC 202 

SOCI 4460. Environmental Sociology. This course examines multiple facets of the relationship between humans and the natural environment. Topics covered include the political economy of environmental problems, the environmental movement, environmental justice, environmenta problems in "developing" countries, and the impacts of environmental problems on human health. Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 

SOCI 4465. Society and Natural Resources. This course is dedicated to analyzing the use of natural resources by humans. The most time is spent investigating water, food, and energy, but conflicts over resources as well as alternative commodity chains will also be examined. By the end of the course, each students will have a better understanding of where our most important resources come from, how they are produced, the effects of their consumption, and what happens when they are disposed of. Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 

SOCI 4492. Sociology Internships. Directed internships are available for qualified students. (See the Intern Program Coordinator for information) Must have permission of Assistant Dean. (0-7-3)

SOCI 4498. Research. Individual research project under faculty direction. Must have permission of instructor & Assistant Dean. (3-0-3)

SOCI 449A. Special Topics in Sociology. A course on selected issues, problems, and literature in sociology. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( SOCI 1101 or SOC 101 or SOCI 1101H ) 

Social Science

SOSC 1000. Background to Current Events. Survey of the political, historical and geographical aspects of the major events in the modern world. All regions of the world will be surveyed with special emphasis on North America. Not open to students with credit in World Geography Survey. (2-0-2)

SOSC 1000H. Background to Current Evnt-Hnr. Survey of the political, historical and geographical aspects of the major events in the modern world. All regions of the world will be surveyed with special emphasis on North America. Not open to students with credit in World Geography Survey. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (2-0-2)

SOSC 1101. The World and Its Peoples. A survey of world human cultures. Emphasis will be on geography, history, economic systems, sociological foundations, governmental systems, and religion. An attempt will be made to integrate the various social sciences using a world regional approach. (3-0-3)

SOSC 1101H. The World and Its People.

SOSC 1101S. World-Its Peoples-Study Abrd. A survey of world human cultures. Emphasis will be on geography, history, economic systems, sociological foundations, governmental systems, and religion. An attempt will be made to integrate the various social sciences using a world regional approach. Taken as a study abroad experience. (3-0-3)

SOSC 4900. Special Topics in Social Sc. A variable credit course on selected issues, problems, and literature in social science. Must have permission of the instructor. (3-0-3)

Spanish

SPAN 1001. Elementary Spanish I. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish and to the culture of Spanish-speaking regions. Not open to students with two or more years of high school Spanish. Designed for students with no previous knowledge of Spanish. Not open to native speakers. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

SPAN 1001S. Elem Spanish - Study Abroad. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish and to the culture of Spanish-speaking regions. Not open to students with two or more years of high school Spanish. Designed for students with no previous knowledge of Spanish. Not open to native speakers. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3) Taken as part of a study abroad experience.

SPAN 1002. Elementary Spanish II. Continued listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish with further study of the culture of Spanish speaking regions. Not open to native speakers. (3-2-3) Prerequisites: SPAN 1001 Minimum Grade: C or SPN 101 Minimum Grade: C 

SPAN 2001. Intermediate Spanish I. Initial exposure to short literary works by authors from Spain and Latin America complemented by biographical and cultural notes. Conversational format with weekly written assignments. Laboratory requirement. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: SPAN 1002 Minimum Grade: C or SPN 102 Minimum Grade: C 

SPAN 2001S. Inter Spanish I - Study Abroad. Initial exposure to short literary works by authors from Spain and Latin America complemented by biographical and cultural notes. Conversational format with weekly written assignments. Laboratory requirement. (3-0-3) Taught as part of a study abroad experience. Prerequisites: SPAN 1002 

SPAN 2002. Intermediate Spanish II. Continues building verbal and grammatical skills and expands exposure to touchstones of Hispanic literature from both continents. Laboratory work. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: SPAN 2001 Minimum Grade: C or SPN 201 Minimum Grade: C or SPAN 2001G Minimum Grade: C 

SPAN 2002S. Inter Spanish II -Study Abroad. Continues building verbal and grammatical skills and expands exposure to touchstones of Hispanic literature from both continents. Laboratory work. (3-0-3) Taught as part of a study abroad experience. Prerequisites: SPAN 2001 or SPAN 2001S 

SPAN 3110. Span Culture-Civil to 1700. Survey of the civilization and culture of Spain from prehistoric times to 1700 A.D. Reading skills in Spanish will be reinforced by discussions, lab work and written examinations in the target language. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( SPAN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or SPN 202 Minimum Grade: C ) 

SPAN 3120. Spn Culture-Civil aft 1700. Survey of the civilization and culture of Spain from 1700 to the present. Reading skills in Spanish will be reinforced by discussions, lab work and written examinations in the target language. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( SPAN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or SPN 202 Minimum Grade: C ) 

SPAN 3130. Latin America Culture-Civil. Culture and civilization of Latin America from pre-Colombian times to the present. Lectures, readings and assignments in Spanish. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( SPAN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or SPN 202 Minimum Grade: C ) 

SPAN 4010. Spanish Conversation. Spanish Conversation focuses on contemporary events and popular Hispanic culture while refining the verbal skills first acquired by students in the introductory sequence of the target language. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( SPAN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or SPN 202 Minimum Grade: C ) 

SPAN 4020. Span Adv Grammar-Composition. Inductive study of Spanish grammar. Excerpts from literary masters illustrate principles of grammar that students analyze, personalize and practice. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( SPAN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or SPN 202 Minimum Grade: C ) 

SPAN 4250. Cervantes. A study of the Quijote and other works by Cervantes. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( SPAN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or SPN 202 Minimum Grade: C ) 

SPAN 4270. Contemporary Spanish Lit. Emphasis on the short story and drama. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( SPAN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or SPN 202 Minimum Grade: C ) 

SPAN 4950. Study Abroad. The study of Spanish language and culture in a native environment. Designed specifically for those students in the University System of Georgia Study Abroad Program. Up to 9 hours of credit may be given upon successful completion of the program. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( SPAN 2002 Minimum Grade: C or SPN 202 Minimum Grade: C ) 

Theater

THEA 1100. Theatre Appreciation. Surveys the contributions of performers, designers, and playwrights to a theatre production. The audience as co-author of the theatre event is also examined. The customary sequence involved in producint a play will be discussed. Information will also be presented about audiences, theatres, performers, and the conventions of the theatre of several eras. Lab fee required. (3-0-3)

THEA 1100H. Honors Theater Appreciation. Surveys the contributions of performers, designers, and playwrights to a theatre production. The audience as co- author of the theatre event is also examined. The customary sequence involved in producint a play will be discussed. Information will also be presented about audiences, theatres, performers, and the conventions of the theatre of several eras. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. Lab fee required. (3-0-3)

THEA 1110. Perf Skills for Bus and Prof. A training and development workshop focused on the cultivation of individual performance skills vital to success in business and professions, and which are especially relevant in the age of modern media. (3-0-3)

THEA 1111. Perf and Prod Practicum. (0-12-1)

THEA 1112. Video Production Practicum. (0-2-1)

THEA 2020. Stage Makeup. An introduction to the basics of stage makeup design and implementation. Coursework is project driven and is designed to give the student the fundamental analytical and applied skills for the design area mentioned above. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: THEA 1100 Minimum Grade: C or THEA 1100H Minimum Grade: C 

THEA 2040. Acting I - Basic Technique. An introduction to the principles of acting, including preparation of the actor's instrument, physical and vocal technique, emotional life, analysis and creation of character. (3-0-3)

THEA 2040H. Acting I - Basic Tech-Hnr. An introduction to the principles of acting, including preparation of the actor's instrument, physical and vocal technique, emotional life, analysis and creation of character. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)

THEA 2111. Perf and Prod Practicum. Intermediate level study of the process and craft of video production through application and practice. Selection by approval of instructor. (0-12-1)

THEA 2112. Video Production Practicum. (0-2-1)

THEA 2220. Voice and Articulation. Study in the physiological and acoustical aspects of vocal delivery and participation in a regimen of exercises to develop articulation and vocal expression. (3-0-3)

THEA 2540. Introduction to Performance. An introduction to the field of performance studies and the performance of non-dramatic texts. The construction of solo performance pieces from dialogues, narrative, ethnography and literature is the primary focus of the course. (3-0-3)

THEA 3020. Stagecraft. An introduction to the elements of scenic construction, production organization and best construction practices. Course combines traditional lecture and assessment with practical application. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: THEA 1100 Minimum Grade: C or THEA 1100H Minimum Grade: C 

THEA 3040. Acting II - Scene Study. (3-0-3)

THEA 3060. Scenic and Lighting Design. An introduction to the basics of theatrical design concentrating on scenic design and how lighting affects the design. Coursework is project driven and is designed to give the student the fundamental analytical and applied skills for the design areas mentioned above. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: THEA 1100 Minimum Grade: C 

THEA 3070. Costume and Lighting Design. An introduction to the basics of theatrical design concentrating on costume design and how lighting affects the design. Coursework is project driven and is designed to give the student the fundamental analytical and applied skills for the design areas mentioned above. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: THEA 1100 Minimum Grade: C 

THEA 3111. Perf and Prod Practicum. Advanced level of study of the process and craft of producing theatre through application and practice. Selection by audition or approval of instructor. (0-12-1)

THEA 3112. Video Production Practicum. (0-0-1)

THEA 4020. Advanced Stagecraft. A study of advanced theatrical production practices. Course work is project driven and is designed to give the student an advanced understanding and applied skills in the areas of theater production and digital media. Prerequisite: THEA 3020 or with instructor approval. (3-0-3)

THEA 4040. Acting III - Adv Technique. Intensive process and performance studio training in contemporary acting methodologies. (3-0-3)

THEA 4080. Acting IV - Period Styles. This course serves to introduce students to the basic techniques and methodologies performing period plays. Particular emphasis is given to approaches to Shakespeare and developing an overall approach to style work. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: THEA 2220 Minimum Grade: C and THEA 2040 Minimum Grade: C 

THEA 4111. Perf and Prod Practicum. (0-12-3)

THEA 4112. Video Production Practicum. (3-0-3)

THEA 4545. Performance Theory. Advanced studies in the performance of non-dramatic text with emphasis on the development of original performance programs. (3-0-3)

THEA 4770. Special Topics in Theater. Advanced opportunities for the study of topics to meet special needs and interest students, presented in conjunction with special programming of the department, or drawing on areas of faculty expertise not covered by the standing offerings. (3-0-3)

THEA 5545. Performance Literacy. Advanced studies of the theatrical and cinematic languages that are transforming the nature of the modern world. (3-0-3)

Orientation

UNIV 1000. The GSW Experience. The purpose of UNIV 1000 is to make students more effective consumers of their education by enhancing their survival in college during the first semester. The intention of this course is to prepare these students to deal successfully and responsibly with their academic obligations and the resouces offered by GSW. This course is required of all first-time students with the exception of part-time students and transfer who have earned more than nine hours of credit. (1-1-1)

UNIV 1000E. The GSW Experience for ESL. The purpose of UNIV 1000 is to make ESL students more effective consumers of their education by enhancing their survival in college during the first semester. The intention of this course is to prepare these students to deal successfully and responsibly with their academic obligations and the resouces offered by GSW. This course is required of all first-time students with the exception of part-time students and transfer who have earned more than nine hours of credit. (2-0-1)

UNIV 1000H. Honors Orientation. The purpose of UNIV 1000 is to make students more effective consumers of their education by enhancing their survival in college during the first semester. The intention of this course is to prepare these students to deal successfully and responsibly with their academic obligations and the resouces offered by GSW. This course is required of all first-time students with the exception of part-time students and transfer who have earned more than nine hours of credit. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (1-1-1)

UNIV 1000N. The GSW Experience for NonTrad. The purpose of UNIV 1000N is to make nontraditional students more effective consumers of their education by enhancing their survival in college during the first semester. The intention of this course is to prepare these students to deal successfully and responsibly with their academic obligations and the resouces offered by GSW. This course is required of all first-time students with the exception of part-time students and transfer who have earned more than nine hours of credit. (1-1-1)

UNIV 1001. Pathways to College Success. Specifically designed for students who have domonstrated an on-going need for additional academic or social support beyond their first semester as they continue to transition to college life. Students will work collaboratively and independently to assess their academic and social challenges in order to devise and implement strategies for future success. Course is required for all first time freshmen with the academic standing of "warning" at the end of initial semester of enrollment. Prerequisites: Approval of Academic Affairs required. (1-0-1)

UNIV 2000. Caregiving Issues-Prof Caregvr. A multidisciplinary approach to caregiving is utilized to provide the student with information regarding caregivers and the vital role(s) they play in providing health care. Offered by the Rosylnn Carter Institute, this course seeks to educate current and potential professional caregivers to better meet the needs of the rapidly rising family and community caregiver populations.

UNIV 4000. Contemporary Int Cultures. This course studies the contemporary culture of a country and the student gains first hand knowledge through a service project with the people of the country. Students will explore the literature, language, music, philosophy, religion, science, education, art, politics, history, healthcare, and/or economics of the country. Course approval through the Dean of Arts and Sciences. (3-0-3)

UNIV 4000H. Contemp Int'l Cultures- Honors. This course studies the contemporary culture of a country and the student gains first hand knowledge through a service project with the people of the country. Students will explore the literature, language, music, philosophy, religion, science, education, art, politics, history, healthcare, and/or economics of the country. Course approval through the Dean of Arts and Sciences. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors program. (3-0-3)

Women's Studies

WMST 2001. Intro to Women's Studies. A course that explores multidisciplinary issues pertinent to Women's Studies and thereby examines women's roles, achievements, and experiences, both historically and across cultures; and also critiques the socio-political and historical creation of gender constructs. (3-0-3)

WMST 2001H. Intro to Women's Studies. A course that explores multidisciplinary issues pertinent to Women's Studies and thereby examines wormen's roles, achievements, and experiences, both historically and across cultures; and also critiques the socio-political creation of gender contructs. This section is for students participating in the GSW Honors Program. (3-0-3)