The Graduate Bulletin 2010-2011 Full Text

GEORGIA SOUTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY

A State University of the University System of Georgia Established 1906

Georgia Southwestern State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action educational institution and as such does not discriminate in any matter concerning students, employees, or services to its community on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, veteran status, handicap, age, or national origin. The University is in compliance with all known federal, state, and local regulations regarding nondiscrimination.

800 Georgia Southwestern State University Drive
Americus, Georgia 31709-4379

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

The statements set forth in this catalog are for informational purposes only and should not be construed as the basis of a contract between a student and this institution. While every effort will be made to ensure accuracy of the material stated herein, Georgia Southwestern State University reserves the right to change any provision listed in this catalog, including but not limited to academic requirements for graduation, without actual notice to individual students. Every effort will be made to keep students advised of such changes. Each student is assigned a faculty advisor who will assist the student in interpreting academic regulations and in planning a program of study chosen by the student. However, final responsibility of selecting and scheduling courses and satisfactorily completing curriculum requirements for any degree rests with the student.

Information regarding academic requirements for graduation is available in the offices of the Registrar, Deans of Schools and Chairs of Departments, and the Vice President for Academic Affairs. It is the responsibility of each student to keep himself or herself apprised of current graduation requirements for a degree program in which he or she is enrolled.

DIRECTORY OF CORRESPONDENCE

For Information onContact
Gifts, Bequests, and Scholarship DonationsPresident
General Information and Graduate AdmissionsSchool of Education
(229) 931-2170

School of Computer & Information Sciences
(229) 931-2100

School of Business
(229) 931-2091
Financial Aid, Scholarships, Student EmploymentStudent Financial Aid Director
HousingVice President for Student Life
Fees, Expenses, and Method of PaymentVice President for Business and Finance
Course Offerings, Academic Reports, and other Scholastic MattersVice President for Academic Affairs
Transcripts and Records of Former StudentsRegistrar
PublicityDirector of Public Relations /td>
AlumniDirector of Development/Alumni Affairs

GRADUATE DEGREES

Areas of StudyMaster of Business AdministrationMaster in EducationMaster of ScienceSpecialist in Education
Business AdministrationX   
Computer Science  X 
Curriculum and Instruction X  
Learning and Leading   X

Graduate Course Descriptions

The descriptions of the courses offered by each school and department follow the information section and listing of degree programs for each school and department.  Numbers following the description of the course indicate the number of weekly class hours, the number of weekly laboratory or practicum hours or other type of required contact hours, and the credit-hour value of the course expressed in semester hours.  For example, (3-2-3) following the course description means three class hours, two laboratory or other hours, and three semester hours of credit.

CALENDAR*

Summer Term 2010
Fall Term 2010
Spring Term 2011
Summer Term 2011

  
SUMMER TERM 2010 
Last Day to Apply for Graduate AdmissionMarch 14, 2010
Last Day to Apply for Undergraduate Admission for May TermApril 25, 2010
Last Day to Apply for Undergraduate Admission for Summer TermMay 15, 2010
Last Day to Apply for Re-Admission (May Term)May 10, 2010
Last Day to Apply for Re-admission (Full-Term and Summer I)June 03, 2010
Last Day to Apply for Re-Admission (Summer II)June 28, 2010
Residence Halls Open for May TermTo Be Announced
May Term RegistrationMay 10, 2010
May Term Classes BeginMay 10, 2010
Midterm for May TermMay 17, 2010
Last Day to Withdraw from Class without Penalty for May TermMay 19, 2010
Last Day of Class for May TermMay 25, 2010
Final Exams for May TermMay 26, 2010
Residence Halls Close for May TermTo Be Announced
Classes Will Not MeetMay 31, 2010
Residence Halls Open for Regular SummerTo Be Announced
Registration/OrientationJune 1, 2010
Classes BeginJune 2, 2010
No Registration or Class Change after This DateJune 7, 2010
Midterm for Summer IJune 14, 2010
Last Day to Withdraw without Penalty for Summer IJune 16, 2010
Last Day of Class for Summer I SessionJune 24, 2010
Final Exams for Summer I SessionJune 25, 2010
Midterm for Full SessionJuly 02, 2010
Registration for Summer II SessionJune 28, 2010
Summer Session II Classes BeginJune 28, 2010
Last Day to Withdraw from Class without Penalty for Full SessionJuly 12, 2010
Classes Will Not MeetJuly 5, 2010
Regents' ExaminationTo Be Announced
Midterm for Summer IIJuly 09, 2010
Last Day to Withdraw without Penalty for Summer IIJuly 14, 2010
Fall 2010 registration (for students enrolled summer 2010)July 12-13, 2010
Learning Support RegistrationJuly 19-20, 2010
Last Day of Class for Summer II Session and Full SessionJuly 21, 2010
Final ExaminationsJuly 22, 23, 24, 2010
Residence Halls CloseTo Be Announced
  
FALL TERM 2010* 
Move In DayAugust 14, 2010
OrientationAugust 16, 2010
Classes BeginAugust 17, 2010
Add/Drop ClassesAugust 17, 18, 19, 2010
Labor Day (No Classes)September 6, 2010
MidtermOctober 8, 2010
Midterm Grades DueOctober 13, 2010
Last Day to Withdraw Without PenaltyOctober 18, 2010
Spring Registration Begins (For Currently Enrolled Students)**October 25, 2010
Regents' TestOctober 27 - 28, 2010
Spring Registration for Transfer, Transient and Re-admit Students BeginsNovember 3, 2010
Monday Class Schedule In Effect*Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Thanksgiving HolidaysNovember 24-27, 2010
Last Day of ClassDecember 3, 2010
FinalsDecember 4, 6-9, 2010
Learning Support RegistrationDecember 7-8, 2010
Senior Grades DueDecember 10, 2010
Last Day to Apply for Undergraduate Admissions for Spring SemesterDecember 10, 2010
GraduationDecember 11, 2010
Grades DueDecember 13, 2010
Last Day to Apply for Re-Admission for Spring SemesterJanuary 5, 2011
*Note: For the Fall Semester 2010, the University will operate a Monday class schedule on Tuesday, Nov. 23rd. This is done to equalize the class minutes between MW and TTH classes and to provide an equal number of class meetings for courses which may meet only once per week.

**Priority Registration begins on this date. It is based on your current class (Graduating Senior, Senior, Junior, Sophmore and Freshman). This is for currently enrolled students. Please check your RAIN account to see when you are eligible to begin registering.
  
SPRING TERM 2011* 
Last Day to Apply for Undergraduate Admissions for Spring SemesterDecember 10, 2010
Last Day to Apply for Re-Admission for Spring SemesterJanuary 5, 2011
Orientation and RegistrationJanuary 6, 2011
First Day of Class (Spring I Term and Full Term)January 7, 2011
Add/Drop Classes for Spring I TermJanuary 7, 2011
Add/Drop Classes for Spring Full TermJanuary 7, 10, 11, 2011
Martin Luther King Jr. Day (No Classes)January 17, 2011
Midterm for Spring I TermFebruary 3, 2011
Midterm Grades Due for Spring I TermFebruary 7, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw Without Penalty for Spring I TermFebruary 9, 2011
Last Day of Class for Spring I TermMarch 1, 2011
Midterm for Spring Full TermMarch 2, 2011
First Day of Class for Spring II TermMarch 3, 2011
Add/Drop Classes for Spring II TermMarch 3, 2011
Midterm Grades Due for Spring Full TermMarch 8, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw Without Penalty for Spring Full TermMarch 14, 2011
Spring BreakMarch 21-26, 2011
Midterm Spring II TermApril 5, 2011
Midterm Grades Due for Spring II TermApril 7, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw Without Penalty for Spring II TermApril 11, 2011
Last Day of Class (Spring II and Full Term)April 29, 2011
FinalsApril 30 - May 2-5, 2011
Learning Support RegistrationMay 3-5, 2011
Senior Grades DueMay 6, 2011
GraduationMay 7, 2011
Grades DueMay 9, 2011
  
SUMMER TERM 2011 
Last Day to Apply for Graduate AdmissionMarch 13, 2011
Last Day to Apply for Undergraduate Admission for May TermApril 24, 2011
Last Day to Apply for Undergraduate Admission for Summer TermMay 14, 2011
Last Day to Apply for Re-Admission (May Term)May 9, 2011
Last Day to Apply for Re-admission (Full-Term and Summer I)June 1, 2011
Last Day to Apply for Re-Admission (Summer II)June 27, 2011
Residence Halls Open for May TermTo Be Announced
May Term RegistrationMay 9, 2011
May Term Classes BeginMay 9, 2011
Last Day to Add/Drop Classes for May TermMay 9, 2011
Midterm for May TermMay 17, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw from Class without Penalty for May TermMay 19, 2011
Last Day of Class for May TermMay 25, 2011
Final Exams for May TermMay 26, 2011
Residence Halls Close for May TermTo Be Announced
Residence Halls Open for Regular SummerTo Be Announced
Registration/OrientationMay 31, 2011
Classes Begin (Summer I Term and Full Term)June 1, 2011
Last Day to Add/Drop Classes for Summer I TermJune 1, 2011
Last Day to Add/Drop Classes for Full TermJune 3, 2011
Midterm for Summer IJune 13, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw without Penalty for Summer IJune 15, 2011
Last Day of Class for Summer I SessionJune 23, 2011
Final Exams for Summer I SessionJune 24, 2011
Midterm for Full SessionJune 27, 2011
Registration for Summer II SessionJune 27, 2011
Summer Session II Classes BeginJune 28, 2011
Last Day to Add/Drop Classes for Summer II TermJune 28, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw from Class without Penalty for Full SessionJuly 5, 2011
Classes Will Not MeetJuly 4, 2011
Midterm for Summer IIJuly 11, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw without Penalty for Summer IIJuly 13, 2011
Fall 2011 registration (for students enrolled summer 2011)July 11-12, 2011
Learning Support RegistrationJuly 25, 26, 2011
Last Day of Class for Summer II Session and Full SessionJuly 21, 2011
Final ExaminationsJuly 22, 23, 25, 26, 2011
Residence Halls CloseTo Be Announced
  

*Correct at date of release; subject to change

OVERVIEW

Mission Statement

General Education

Confidentiality of Student Records: Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

GEORGIA SOUTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY

Georgia Southwestern State University is a senior unit of the University System of Georgia. The University was founded in 1906 as the Third District Agricultural and Mechanical School. In 1926, it was granted a charter authorizing the school to offer two years of college work and to change the name to Third District Agricultural and Normal College. The name was changed to Georgia Southwestern College in 1932, at which time it was placed under the jurisdiction of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. In 1964, the College became a senior unit of the University System, conferring its first baccalaureate degrees in June of 1968. Graduate work was added to the curriculum in June of 1973. In July 1996, the Board of Regents authorized state university status, and the institution became Georgia Southwestern State University.

Georgia Southwestern State University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097, telephone number 404-679-4501) to award bachelor, master and specialist degrees.

The School of Education is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (2010 Massachusetts Ave NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20036, telephone number 202-466-7496) and all initial teacher education programs are recognized and approved by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (http://www.gapsc.com).

The Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing is fully accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (3343 Peachtree Road, NE, Suite 500, Atlanta, GA 30326; 404.975.5000) and has the full approval of the Georgia Board of Nursing (237 Coliseum Drive, Macon, GA 31217-3858; 478-207-1300 or 1640).

The School of Business Administration is accredited by AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. AACSB accreditation is the hallmark of excellence in business education and has been earned by less than five percent of the world's business schools. AACSB International is located at 777 South Harbour Island Boulevard, Suite 750, Tampa, FL 33602-5730 USA, telephone number 813-769-6500 and fax number 813-769-6559 (www.aacsb.edu).

The University is located on 250 acres of improved wooded land in the community of Americus, Georgia, 135 miles south of Atlanta. The attractive campus includes recreational areas, a spring-fed lake, and thirty-five buildings.

Mission Statement

Georgia Southwestern State University is a dynamic community of learning on a residential campus, offering students personalized and challenging experiences in preparation for successful careers, productive citizenship, and a satisfying quality of life. The respected faculty demonstrates intense dedication to teaching and offer outstanding professional degree programs of study with a foundation in the liberal arts and sciences. Learning is strengthened by an effective student-oriented staff committed to the optimal development of each student. The location, atmosphere, and relationships of the University create a stimulating environment for intellectual inquiry in pursuit of truth and knowledge.

Georgia Southwestern State University shares with the other state universities of the University System of Georgia the following core characteristics and purposes:

  • a commitment to excellence and responsiveness within a scope of influence defined by the needs of an area of the state, and by particularly outstanding programs or distinctive characteristics that have a magnet effect throughout the region or state;
  • a commitment to a teaching/learning environment, both within and beyond the classroom, that sustains instructional excellence, serves a diverse and college-prepared student body, promotes high levels of student achievement, offers academic assistance, and provides developmental studies programs for a limited cohort;
  • a high quality general education program supporting a variety of disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and professional academic programming at the baccalaureate level, with selected master and educational specialist degrees, and selected associate degree programs based on area need and/or inter-institutional collaborations;
  • a commitment to public service, continuing education, technical assistance, cultural offerings, and economic development activities that address the needs, improve the quality of life, and raise the educational level within the University's scope of influence.
  • a commitment to scholarship and creative work to enhance instructional effectiveness and to encourage faculty scholarly pursuits and a commitment to applied research in selected areas of institutional strength and area need.

Georgia Southwestern State University endorses the following mission statement for the University System of Georgia and envisions its own mission within the context of the principles adopted by the Board of Regents.

The mission for the University System of Georgia is to contribute to the educational, cultural, economic, and social advancement of Georgia by providing excellent undergraduate general education and first-rate programs leading to associate, baccalaureate, master, professional, and doctorate degrees; by pursuing leading-edge basic and applied research, scholarly inquiry, and creative endeavors; and by bringing these intellectual resources to bear on the economic development of the State and the continuing education of its citizens.

Georgia Southwestern State University academic advising is a teaching and learning process dedicated to student success. Academic advising engages students in developing a plan to realize their educational, career, and life goals and provides a mechanism for monitoring and guiding students' completion of their goals in a timely and efficient manner.

Georgia Southwestern State University shares the following characteristics with other institutions in the University System of Georgia:

  • a supportive campus climate, leadership and development opportunities, and necessary services, all to meet the needs of students, faculty and staff;
  • cultural, ethnic, racial, and gender diversity in the faculty, staff, and student body, supported by practices and programs that embody the ideals of an open, democratic, and global society;
  • technology to advance educational purposes, including instructional technology, student support services, and distance education; and
  • a commitment to sharing physical, human, information, and other resources in collaboration with other System institutions, State agencies, local schools, and technical institutes to expand and enhance programs and services available to the citizens of Georgia.

The programs and educational opportunities at Georgia Southwestern State University are characterized by the following distinctive features: As a residential, comprehensive university, Georgia Southwestern serves a diverse student body, primarily drawn from southwest Georgia, with programs leading to bachelor, master, and education specialist degrees. A growing number of students from across the state as well as international and out-of-state students are also attracted by programs in a number of different areas. For example, international students are attracted to Georgia Southwestern State University's Asian Studies Center, which develops and delivers instructional programs in language and culture. In addition, mature learners are drawn from the region as well as across the nation to the Center for Elderhostel Studies, the second largest Elderhostel program in the U.S.

As a community of learning, Georgia Southwestern faculty and staff are dedicated to creating an environment, work-study appointments, and practicum experiences in a number of businesses and community agencies, including the international headquarters of Habitat for Humanity, are vital elements in creating this environment for learning.

Georgia Southwestern fulfills its commitment to research and public service through the individual efforts of an outstanding faculty and the focused activities of specific centers, which rely heavily on external funding. The Rosalynn Carter Institute serves as a regional and national focal point for research and public service in the area of care giving. The Center for Business and Economic Development conducts research on regional economic issues and facilitates development activities in the region. The program in Third World Studies has served as the guiding force in the development of a professional association and journal contributing to Georgia Southwestern's international reputation. The Center for Community Based Theater, a unique, emerging partnership with the City of Americus, provides opportunities for students, faculty, and community members to explore topics and develop dramatic productions that are drawn from the culture of the community.

Georgia Southwestern State University aspires to become recognized nationally as a state university, which is committed to learning and is responsive to the educational, social, and cultural needs of the region.

General Education in the University System of Georgia

From the origins of intellectual study to the present, general education has been a key to fulfilling life of self-knowledge, self-reflection, critical awareness, and lifelong learning. General education has traditionally focused on oral and written communication, quantitative reasoning and mathematics, studies in culture and society, scientific reasoning, and aesthetic appreciation. Today, general education also assists students in their understanding of technology, information literacy, diversity, and global awareness. In meeting all of these needs, general education provides college students with their best opportunity to experience the breadth of human knowledge and the ways that knowledge in various disciplines is interrelated.

In the University System of Georgia, general education programs consist of a group of courses known as the Core Curriculum as well as other courses and co-curricular experiences specific to each institution. The attainment of general education learning outcomes prepares responsible, reflective citizens who adapt constructively to change. General education programs impart knowledge, values, skills, and behaviors related to critical thinking and logical problem solving. General education includes opportunities for interdisciplinary learning and the experiences that increase intellectual curiosity, providing the basis for advanced study in the variety of fields offered by today's colleges and universities.

@2005 Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia

Confidentiality of Student Records: Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

  1. Georgia Southwestern State University is covered by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), as amended, which is designed to protect students' rights in regard to education records maintained by the institution. Under the Act, students have the following rights:
    1. the right to inspect and review education records maintained by the institution that pertain to you;
    2. the right to challenge the content of records (except grades which can only be challenged through the Grade Appeal Process) on the grounds that they are inaccurate, misleading or a violation of your privacy or other rights; and
    3. the right to control disclosures from your education records with certain exceptions.
  2. Any student who is or has been in attendance at Georgia Southwestern State University has the right to inspect and review his or her educational records within a reasonable period of time (not to exceed 45 days) after making a written request. However, the student shall not have access to:
    1. Financial records of parents.
    2. Confidential letters of recommendation placed in record prior to January 1, 1975.
    3. Letters of recommendation concerning admission, application for employment or honors for which the student has voluntarily signed a waiver.
  3. Directory information will be treated as public information and be generally available on all students and former students, at the discretion of the university. Directory information includes the student's name; telephone number; major field of study; dates of attendance; degrees, honors and awards received; level, and full or part time status. Participation in officially recognized sports; height, weight, age, hometown and general interest items of members of athletic teams is also included in Directory Information.
  4. Requests for Education Records should be made in writing to the Registrar, Georgia Southwestern State University. "Education Records" means generally any record maintained by or for Georgia Southwestern State University and containing information directly related to the students' academic activities.
  5. Students who challenge the correctness of student educational records shall file a written request for amendment with the Registrar. The student shall also present to the Registrar copies of all available evidence relating to the data or material being challenged. The Registrar shall forward the information to the custodian of the record who will consider the request and shall notify the student in writing within 15 business days whether the request will be granted or denied. During that time, any challenge may be settled informally between the student or the parents of a dependent student and the custodian of the records, in consultation with other appropriate University officials. If an agreement is reached it shall be in writing and signed by all parties involved. A copy of such agreement will be maintained in the student's record. If an agreement is not reached informally or, if the request for amendment is denied, the student shall have the right to challenge through the Grievance Procedure outlined in the Student Handbook.
  6. Release of protected information in the student's educational record without consent will be allowed to:
    1. Institutional personnel who have a legitimate educational interest.
    2. Officials of other schools where the student seeks to enroll or transfer credit. Information for students in joint degree or dual degree programs will be released as requested by participating institutions. Efforts will be made to notify the student of the release of such information.
    3. Representatives of Federal agencies authorized by law to have access to education records, and state education authorities.
    4. Appropriate persons in connection with a student's application for or receipt of financial aid.
    5. State and local officials to whom information must be released pursuant to a state statue adopted prior to November 19, 1974.
    6. Organizations conducting studies for the institution.
    7. Accrediting organizations.
    8. Parents of a dependent student, as determined by the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, as amended.
    9. Persons necessary in emergency situations to protect health and safety.
    10. Persons designated in subpoenas or court orders.
  7. If a request for Education Records is not covered by the Annual Disclosure Statement provided by the Registrar, the written request for release of information should be submitted to the Registrar and contain the following information:
    1. Specific records to be released.
    2. Reasons for such release.
    3. To whom records are to be released.
    4. Date.
    5. Signature of the student.
  8. Records will be released in compliance with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena. However, reasonable efforts will be made to notify the student in advance of compliance.
  9. Students have the right to obtain copies of official transcripts provided all financial obligations to the University have been met. Students will be charged at the prevailing rate for each certified transcript obtained. Copies of other information in the student's education record will be provided at a cost of $0.25 per page of copy.
  10. Students who feel that their rights have been violated under the provisions of the Family Educational and Privacy Act should write to the following office: Department of Education, 330 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20201.
  11. Georgia has an Open Records Act. All records kept by Georgia Southwestern State University, except those protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, are subject to public open records requests. Requests for public open records should be submitted in writing to the Director of Human Resources, Georgia Southwestern State University.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

In accordance with regulations of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, all matriculation charges, board, room rent, or other charges are subject to change at the end of any semester.

BUSINESS REGULATIONS

Georgia Southwestern State University, as a unit of the University System of Georgia, receives the major portion of its operating funds from the State of Georgia through appropriations.

The academic year is divided into two semesters of approximately fifteen weeks and a summer term.

Certain regulations must be observed to conform to the policies of the Board of Regents. Fees and charges are due and payable at the beginning of each term at the time of registration. Registration is not complete until all fees have been paid. Students should not begin the registration process without having sufficient funds to pay all fees.

A student who is delinquent in his or her financial obligations to the University may be administratively withdrawn from classes for the term that is unpaid. If this action is necessary, the student is not allowed to remain in class or participate in online classes. The procedures for reinstatement are as follows: 1) submit payment in full to the Student Accounts Office: 2) request reinstatement in each course and ask the instructor to email the registrar that the reinstatement is approved. Submission of payment does not ensure reinstatement.

A student who is delinquent in his or her financial obligations to the University, or to any facet of the University community, will not be allowed to register for the next term, to transfer credits to another school, to receive academic transcripts, or to graduate from the University. In some instances the financially delinquent student may be enjoined by the appropriate University official from attending classes for which enrolled and/or from taking final examinations.

A student, with outstanding financial obligations to the University, or any facet of the University community, must submit payment in cash for these obligations prior to the release of any refund and/or payroll check(s). Such penalties will accrue in addition to the penalties described above.

Fulfillment of financial obligations restores the student to one's prior status as a member of the University community, except for academic losses which accrue as a normal result of the prior financial irresponsibility.

If any check is not paid on presentation to the bank on which it is drawn, a service charge of $15 or 5 percent of the face amount of the check, whichever is greater, will be charged. When two checks have been returned by any student's bank without payment, check cashing privileges will be suspended.

The health service fee provides for limited medical care in the University Health Center and is charged all students taking three or more semester hours of on-campus classes.

The student activity fee is assessed to all students taking three or more semester hours of on campus classes. It provides financial support for a broad program of literary, dramatic, musical, and social activities and defrays most of the expenses of publishing the newspaper and other University publications.

The athletic fee is charged all students taking three or more semester hours of on campus classes. It contributes to the financial support of inter-collegiate athletic activities.

A student residing on-campus and enrolled for one or more semester hours at any location is required to pay the health service fee, student activity fee, athletic fee and postal fee.

The technology fee and institutional fee are assessed to all students. These fees allow GSW to provide state of the art technology and instructional services to students.

FEE PAYMENT DEADLINES FOR 2010-2011

Fall - August 6, 2010
Spring - December 16, 2010

A late payment fee of $50.00 will be assessed to students not paid in full by the deadline.

SEMESTER COSTS

Matriculation charges, board (meal plans), fees and other charges are assessed on a term basis. Housing costs are assessed either by term or by month depending on the contract on file in Residence Life. All matriculation charges, board, room rates, and other charges are subject to change. The fees rates in effect as of Fall Semester 2010 can be found at http://gsw.edu/Campus-Life/CampusLiving/StudentAccount/TuitionandFees/GeorgiaResident  for students who are considered residents of Georgia. Fee rates that are in effect beginning Fall Semester 2010 for students who are not considered residents of Georgia can be found at http://gsw.edu/Campus-Life/CampusLiving/StudentAccount/TuitionandFees/NonGeorgiaResident . Each application for admission (including re-admission), graduate and undergraduate, must be accompanied by a $25 non-refundable application fee. Undergraduate students are required to pay an additional $45 deposit after they have been notified of their acceptance. This deposit may be refunded if an applicant cancels his/her application prior to twenty days before registration. The deposit will be credited toward matriculation fees at the time the student enrolls.

Food Service Rates:

GSW offers several dining options to help meet our students' busy lives. All students housed on campus with less than 60 credit hours will purchase a meal plan. Residents with over 60 hours who decide not to purchase a meal plan will have a mandatory minimum $100 Declining Balance added to their account. Off campus students may purchase a meal ticket if desired. No refund will be made on any meal plan purchases unless the student withdraws from the University. More information concerning meal plans and food services can be found at http://www.campusdish.com/en-US/CSS/gswdining.

Residence Hall Rates - Per Semester

Southwestern provides students with modern housing to compliment their college experience. Specific information concerning these options can be found at http://gsw.edu/Campus-Life/CampusLiving/ResidenceLife/index

A $50 application fee and a $250 damage deposit must be submitted with the student-housing contract. The deposit, less any charges, which may accrue due to damage, improper checkout, etc., will be refunded after the termination of the final housing contract.

Parking Fees: (All students who plan to operate a vehicle on campus)

Annual: Fall-Summer$18.00
($10 Spring-Summer, $7 Summer only) 

Other Fees:

Postal Fee$8.00
Applied Music Fee - 1 hour per week instruction$120.00
Lab Fees may be assigned to specific courses

Matriculation Fee and Deposit

Each application for admission, graduate and undergraduate, must be accompanied by a $20 non-refundable application fee. Undergraduate students are required to pay an additional $25 deposit after they have been notified of their acceptance. This deposit may be refunded if an applicant cancels his/her application prior to twenty days before registration. The deposit will be credited toward matriculation fees at the time the student enrolls.

A seventy-five dollar ($75) residence hall deposit, $250 for apartments, must be submitted with the student housing contract. The deposit, less any charges which may accrue due to damage, improper check-out, etc., will be refunded after the termination of the final housing contract.

REFUND OF FEES

Students who formally withdraw from the University prior to passing the 60% point in time during the term are eligible for a partial refund of fees. Refunds are made only when a student completely withdraws from the University, and no refunds are made when a student of his or her own volition reduces the course load after the add/drop period. Students may receive a refund resulting from a reduction of their course load during the add/drop period. No refunds for withdrawals will be made after passing the 60% point in time during the semester. It is the student's responsibility to withdraw officially in accordance with University regulations.

Forms for withdrawal from the University are available at http://gsw.edu/Assets/AcademicResources/StudentForms/WithdrawalfromtheUniversityfortheSemester.pdf  The completed form should be submitted to the First Year Advocate located in the Nursing Building room 126 (229-931-7010) or faxed to 229-931-2277. A refund of tuition and fees, in accordance with federal, state, and institutional policies, will be issued within 30 days of receipt of completed withdrawal forms by the Business Office.

Students who formally withdraw from the institution on or before the first day of class are entitled to a refund of 100% of the tuition and fees paid for that period of enrollment. (First day of class is defined as "classes begin" date published in the GSW Bulletin.)

Students who formally withdraw from the institution after the first day of class but before the 60% point in time during the term are subject to guidelines established by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. This policy states:

The refund amount for students withdrawing from the institution shall be based on a pro rata percentage determined by dividing the number of calendar days in the semester that the student completed by the total calendar days in the semester. The total calendar days in a semester includes weekends, but excludes scheduled breaks of five or more days and days that a student was on an approved leave of absence. The unearned portion shall be refunded up to the point in time that the amount equals 60%.
 
Students that withdraw from the institution when the calculated percentage of completion is greater than 60% are not entitled to a refund of any portion of institutional charges.
 
A refund of all matriculation fees and other mandatory fees shall be made in the event of the death of a student at any time during the academic session. (BR Minutes, 1979-80, p.61; 1986-87 pp. 24-25; 1995, p.246)

The University is required to determine how much student financial aid was earned by students who withdraw during the term. If students have 'unearned aid' because they were disbursed more than they earned, it may be necessary for the unearned portion to be returned to the appropriate student financial aid fund. If the students have 'earned aid' that they have not received, they may be eligible to receive those funds.

TEXTBOOKS AND SUPPLIES

Textbooks, Trade books, Software, General Merchandise (including GSW items), and school supplies are available in the Campus Bookstore. The Bookstore is located in the Marshall Student Center next to the Campus Post Office. The cost of books and supplies will vary with the courses selected by the individual student. A fair estimate of this cost is from $400 - $600 per semester. The Campus Bookstore buys back textbooks for cash three times a year during finals week at the end of each semester for up to 50% of the original purchase price.

Refunds for textbooks will not be given without the following:

  1. Cash register receipt dated within current term.
  2. Valid student I.D.

AUDIT (NON-CREDIT) FEE

Fees for attending class on an audit or non-credit basis are calculated on the same schedule as regular academic fees.

OTHER FEES AND CHARGES

LATE REGISTRATION FEE:

Failure to submit fee payment on specified date 
Undergraduate (non-refundable)$50.00
Graduate (non-refundable)$50.00

RETURNED CHECK FEE:

For each check$15.00
OR 5 percent of the face amount of the check, whichever is greater.

TRANSCRIPT FEE:

Initial Request (One Copy)No Charge
Each Official Request Thereafter$5.00

GRADUATION FEE:

Certificate$15.00
Associate Degree$25.00
Bachelor's Degree$25.00
Master's Degree$25.00
Specialist Degree$25.00

TESTING FEES:

Independent Study Testing Fee$30.00
MAT Testing Fee$50.00

RE-APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION FEE:

Per re-admit term$25.00

 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS AS RESIDENTS AND NON-RESIDENTS

A student is responsible for registering under the proper residency classification. A student classified as a non-resident who believes that he/she is entitled to be reclassified as a legal resident may petition the Registrar for a change of status. The petition must be filed no later than thirty (30) days before the term begins in order for the student to be considered for reclassification for that term. If the petition is granted, reclassification will not be retroactive to prior terms. The necessary forms for this purpose are available in the Registrar's Office or click here.

To register as a legal resident of Georgia at an institution of the University System, a student must establish the following facts to the satisfaction of the Registrar:

    1. If a person is 18 years of age or older, he or she may register as an in-state student only upon showing that he or she has been a legal resident of Georgia for a period of at least 12 months immediately preceding the date of registration.
      Exceptions:
      1. A student whose parent, spouse, or court-appointed guardian is a legal resident of the State of Georgia may register as a resident providing the parent, spouse, or guardian can provide proof of legal residency in the State of Georgia for at least 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the date of registration.
      2. A student who previously held residency status in the State of Georgia but moved from the state and then returned to the state in 12 or fewer months.
      3. Students who are transferred to Georgia by employer are not subject to the durational residency requirement.
    2. No emancipated minor or other person 18 years of age or older shall be deemed to have gained or acquired in-state status for tuition purposes while attending any educational institution in this state, in the absence of a clear demonstration that he or she in fact established legal residence in this state.
  1. If a parent or legal guardian of a student changes his or her legal residence to another state following a period of legal residence in Georgia, the student may retain his or her classification as an in-state student as long as he or she remains continuously enrolled in the University System of Georgia, regardless of the status of his or her parent or legal guardian.
  2. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed by a court as guardian of a nonresident minor, such minor will be permitted to register as a in-state student providing the guardian can provide proof that he or she has been a resident of Georgia for the period of 12 months immediately preceding the date of the court appointment.
  3. Aliens shall be classified as nonresident students, provided, however, that an alien who is living in this country under an immigration document permitting indefinite or permanent residence shall have the same privilege of qualifying for in-state tuition as a citizen of the United States.

OUT-OF-STATE TUITION WAIVERS

According to 704.041 of the Board of Regents Policy Manual, An institution may award out-of-state tuition differential waivers and assess in-state tuition for certain nonresidents of Georgia under the following conditions:

  1. Academic Common Market. Students selected to participate in a program offered through the Academic Common Market.
  2. International and Superior Out-of-State Students. International students and superior out-of-state students selected by the institutional president or an authorized representative, provided that the number of such waivers in effect does not exceed 2% of the equivalent full-time students enrolled at the institution in the fall term immediately preceding the term for which the out-of-state tuition is to be waived.
  3. University System Employees and Dependents. Full-time employees of the University System, their spouses, and their dependent children.
  4. Medical/Dental Students and Interns. Medical and dental residents and medical and dental interns at the Medical College of Georgia (BR Minutes, 1986-87, p. 340).
  5. Full-Time School Employees. Full-time employees in the public schools of Georgia or Technical College System of Georgia (BR Minutes, October 2008), their spouses, and their dependent children. Teachers employed full-time on military bases in Georgia shall also qualify for this waiver (BR Minutes, 1988-89, p. 43).
  6. Career Consular Officials. Career consular officers, their spouses, and their dependent children who are citizens of the foreign nation that their consular office represents and who are stationed and living in Georgia under orders of their respective governments.
  7. Military Personnel. Military personnel, their spouses, and their dependent children stationed in or assigned to Georgia and on active duty. The waiver can be retained by the military personnel, their spouses, and their dependent children if
    1. the military sponsor is reassigned outside of Georgia, and the student(s) remain(s) continuously enrolled and the military sponsor remains on active military status;
    2. the military sponsor is reassigned out-of-state and the spouse and dependent children remain in Georgia and the sponsor remains on active military duty; or
    3. Active military personnel and their spouse and dependent children who are stationed in a state contiguous to the Georgia border and who live in Georgia. (BR Minutes, February 2009)
  8. Research University Graduate Students. Graduate students attending the University of Georgia, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia State University, and the Medical College of Georgia, which shall be authorized to waive the out-of-state tuition differential for a limited number of graduate students each year, with the understanding that the number of students at each of these institutions to whom such waivers are granted, shall not exceed the number assigned below at any one point in time:
    University of Georgia80
    Georgia Institute of Technology60
    Georgia State University80
    Medical College of Georgia20

  9. Border County Residents. Students domiciled in an out-of-state county bordering Georgia, enrolling in a program offered at a location approved by the Board of Regents and for which the offering institution has been granted permission to award Border County waivers (BR Minutes, October 2008).
  10. Georgia National Guard and U.S. Military Reservists. Active members of the Georgia National Guard, stationed or assigned to Georgia or active members of a unit of the U.S. Military Reserves based in Georgia, and their spouses and their dependent children (BR Minutes, October 2008).
  11. Students enrolled in University System institutions as part of Competitive Economic Development Projects. Students who are certified by the Commissioner of the Georgia Department of Economic Development as being part of a competitive economic development project.
  12. Students in Georgia-Based Corporations. Students who are employees of Georgia-based corporations or organizations that have contracted with the Board of Regents through University System institutions to provide out-of-state tuition differential waivers.
  13. Students in Pilot Programs. Terminated October 2008.
  14. Students in ICAPP® Advantage programs. Any student participating in an ICAPP® Advantage program. .
  15. International and Domestic Exchange Programs. Any student who enrolls in a University System institution as a participant in an international or domestic direct exchange program that provides reciprocal benefits to University System students (BR Minutes, October 2008).
  16. Economic Advantage. As of the first day of classes for the term, an economic advantage waiver may be granted to a U.S. citizen or U.S. legal permanent resident who is a dependent or independent student and can provide clear evidence that the student or the student's parent, spouse, or U.S. court-appointed legal guardian has relocated to the State of Georgia to accept full-time, self-sustaining employment and has established domicile in the State of Georgia. Relocation to the state must be for reasons other than enrolling in an institution of higher education. For U.S. citizens or U.S. legal permanent residents, this waiver will expire 12 months from the date the waiver was granted.

    As of the first day of classes for the term, an economic advantage waiver may be granted to an independent non-citizen possessing a valid employment-related visa status who can provide clear evidence of having relocated to the State of Georgia to accept full-time, self-sustaining employment. Relocation to the state must be for employment reasons and not for the purpose of enrolling in an institution of higher education. These individuals would be required to show clear evidence of having taken legally permissible steps toward establishing legal permanent residence in the United States and the establishment of legal domicile in the State of Georgia. Independent non-citizen students may continue to receive this waiver as long as they maintain a valid employment-related visa status and can demonstrate continued efforts to establish U.S. legal permanent residence and legal domicile in the State of Georgia.

    A dependent non-citizen student who can provide clear evidence that the student's parent, spouse, or U.S. court-appointed legal guardian possesses a valid employment-related visa status and can provide clear evidence of having relocated to the State of Georgia to accept full-time, self-sustaining employment is also eligible to receive this waiver. Relocation to the state must be for employment reasons and not for the purpose of enrolling in an institution of higher education. These individuals must be able to show clear evidence of having taken legally permissible steps toward establishing legal permanent residence in the United States and the establishment of legal domicile in the State of Georgia. Non-citizen students currently receiving a waiver who are dependents of a parent, spouse, or U.S. court-appointed legal guardian possessing a valid employment-related visa status may continue to receive this waiver as long as they can demonstrate that their parent, spouse, or U.S. court-appointed legal guardian is maintaining full-time, self-sustaining employment in Georgia and is continuing efforts to pursue an adjustment of status to U.S. legal permanent resident and the establishment of legal domicile in the State of Georgia. (BR Minutes amended October 2008.)
  17. Recently Separated Military Service Personnel. Members of a uniformed military service of the United States who, within 12 months of separation from such service, enroll in an academic program and demonstrate an intent to become domiciled in Georgia. This waiver may also be granted to their spouses and dependent children. This waiver may be granted for not more than one year (BR Minutes, June 2004, amended October 2008).
  18. Nonresident Student. As of the first day of classes for the term, a nonresident student can be considered for this waiver under the following conditions:
    • Dependent Student. If the parent, or U.S. court-appointed legal guardian has maintained domicile in Georgia for at least 12 consecutive months and the student can provide clear and legal evidence showing the relationship to the parent or U.S. court-appointed legal guardian has existed for at least 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the first day of classes for the term. Under Georgia code legal guardianship must be established prior to the student's 18th birthday (BR Minutes, October 2008).
    • Independent Student. If the student can provide clear and legal evidence showing relations to the spouse and the spouse has maintained domicile in Georgia for at least 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the first day of classes for the term. This waiver can remain in effect as long as the student remains continuously enrolled (BR Minutes, October 2008).

      If the parent, spouse, or U.S. court-appointed legal guardian of a continuously enrolled nonresident student establishes domicile in another state after having maintained domicile in the State of Georgia for the required period, the nonresident student may continue to receive this waiver as long as the student remains continuously enrolled in a public postsecondary educational institution in the state, regardless of the domicile of the parent, spouse or U.S. court-appointed legal guardian (BR Minutes, June 2006, amended October 2008).
    • Vocational Rehabilitation Waiver. Students enrolled in a University System of Georgia institution based on a referral by the Vocational Rehabilitation Program of the Georgia Department of Labor (BR Minutes, October 2008).

      Waiver of Mandatory Fees for U.S. Military Reserve and Georgia National Guard Combat Veterans

Board of Regents Policy 704.043 provides a waiver of mandatory fees for U.S. Military Reserve and Georgia National Guard Combat Veterans.

  1. Eligibility. Eligible participants must be Georgia residents who are active members of the U.S. Military Reserves and/or the Georgia National Guard and were deployed overseas for active service in a location or locations designated by the U.S. Department of Defense as combat zones on or after September 11, 2001 and served for a consecutive period of 181 days, or who received full disability as a result of injuries received in such combat zone, or were evacuated from such combat zone due to severe injuries during any period of time while on active service. Additionally, eligible participants must meet the admissions requirements of the applicable USG institution and be accepted for admission.
  2. Benefits. Eligible participants shall receive a waiver of all mandatory fees charged by USG institutions including, but not limited to, intercollegiate athletic fees, student health services fees, parking and transportation (where such fees are mandated for all students), technology fees, student activity fees, fees designated to support leases on facilities such as recreation centers, parking decks, student centers and similar facilities, and any other such mandatory fees for which all students are required to make payment. Students receiving this waiver shall be eligible to use the services and facilities these fees are used to provide. This benefit shall not apply to housing, food service, any other elective fees, special fees or other user fees and charges (e.g., application fees).

FINANCIAL AID TO STUDENTS

Students who are not regularly admitted to a graduate degree program are not eligible for financial aid.

The University provides loan programs to assist students who have financial need. Scholarships, loans, and part-time work constitute the types of financial aid. It is preferable that financial aid applications for the next academic year be filed by April 15th. Detailed information and appropriate forms may be secured by contacting the Financial Aid Office, Georgia Southwestern State University. All awards are contingent on funds being available.

Most types of financial aid are awarded on the basis of a student's academic progress and proven financial need. As used in relation to financial aid, the term financial need means the monetary difference between the total cost of attending the University and the computed amount of financial resources which the student and the family can contribute toward the total cost. The total cost of attending the University include tuition and all fees, room and board, books and supplies, personal expenses, and allowable transportation costs.

Financial need is computed by a standard need analysis system using confidential information submitted by the parents or the independent student. The need analysis system used by Georgia Southwestern State University is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) administered by the Federal Government. The analysis of a family's financial resources includes consideration of current family income, assets, family size, and number in college. Federal aid programs, state aid programs and many college programs do not permit aid awards that exceed the computed financial need. Thus, the information on all sources of aid must be provided to the Financial Aid Office. The amount of a student's computed financial need is the total cost of attending Georgia Southwestern State University minus the computed family resources.

Procedures for Applying for Financial Aid

Students should complete FAFSA as soon as possible after January 1. Application for financial aid at Georgia Southwestern State University includes the following steps:

  1. Make application for admission to the University. Applicants for financial aid need not be accepted for enrollment before an award is packaged but must be accepted in an eligible academic program before aid is disbursed. Transfer students from other colleges must have a transcript and an admissions application on file at the time of application for financial assistance.
  2. Complete the FAFSA either on-line (www.fafsa.ed.gov), list GSW Code 001573. The paper application for financial aid is available from the Financial Aid Office, Georgia Southwestern State University.
  3. Listing GSW school on the FAFSA will mark GSW as a recipient of the student's financial information, which will be received electronically. Until this information is received by the institution electronically, the student's file cannot be processed.

Financial aid is not automatically renewed. Continuing students must reapply for financial aid each year, as soon after January 1 as possible. All application information received after April 15th will be processed, but awards will be made as funds permit.

SCHOLARSHIPS

Scholarships are monetary gifts which usually do not require repayment. They are awarded on the basis of academic performance and other specific criteria stipulated by the agency or person(s) funding the scholarship. The amount of the awards may vary according to the established need of the scholarship recipient. In order to remain eligible to receive most academic scholarships, a student recipient must be enrolled for at least 9 credit hours each term, earn a 3.0 cumulative grade point, and remain in good judicial standing.

HOPE Teacher Scholarship (Graduate)

To be eligible for a HOPE Teacher Scholarship, the student must:

  1. Be a Georgia resident.
  2. Be enrolled in a graduate program in a critical field.
  3. Commit to teach/serve in his or her critical field in a Georgia public school to repay scholarship.

Critical Fields include the following (subject to change):

  • Middle Grade Education (Grades 4-8) with primary concentration in one of the following:
  • Math
  • Science
  • Math and Science
  • Mathematic Education (Grades 7-12)
  • Education of Exceptional Children (Grades P-12)
    • Behavioral Disorder
    • Interrelated Special Education
  • Foreign Language Education (Grades P-12)
    • French
    • Spanish
  • Business Education (Grades 7-12)
  • Industrial Arts/Technology Education (Grades 7-12)
  • Trade and Industrial Education (Grades 7-12)
  • Agriculture Education (Grades 7-12)
  • Science Education (Grades 7-12)
    • Broad Field Science
    • Biology
    • Chemistry
    • Earth/Space
    • Physics

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Several types of part-time employment are available through Georgia Southwestern State University.

Graduate Assistantships

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available in some departments. Interested students should contact the Director of Graduate Studies or the appropriate school or office. For additional information, see the section on Graduate Studies.

Part-Time Employment

The Career Services Office maintains a list of jobs available in the community. Any student interested in part-time work should file an application.

FINANCIAL AID POLICIES

Georgia Southwestern State University administers its financial aid program in compliance with all applicable Federal and State laws and regulations. Specifically, the financial aid policies are listed below:

  1. To receive any Federal financial aid, a student must maintain satisfactory progress toward a degree as determined by Federal standards. Among other requirements, Federal standards generally define "satisfactory progress toward graduation" as passing 67% of all academic work attempted during an academic year. For students who fail to meet these standards, their financial aid will be terminated. They will not be eligible to receive further aid until such time they have corrected the deficiency at their own expense.
  2. To receive Federal aid, the student must not owe a refund on previous Federal grants or be in default on a Federal student loan.
  3. Refunds are made in accordance with the schedule in the current University Bulletin. Any refund from a Federal source will be returned to that fund in the appropriate order.

More information on financial aid may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office, Room 207, Sanford Hall. Office hours are from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Summer hours may vary. Please call 229-928-1378 to determine schedule for summer hours.

VETERANS' BENEFITS

Georgia Southwestern State University is approved for the educational training of veterans and certain eligible spouses and dependents of veterans. The institution serves only as a source of certification and information to the Veterans Administration as all financial transactions and eligibility determinations are handled directly between the student and the VA. Veterans and other eligible persons interested in obtaining educational benefits must meet all applicable requirements for admission as outlined in this bulletin. After being officially admitted to the University, the veteran or eligible person should contact the Veteran Certifying Official in the Registrar's Office for information concerning application procedures and educational benefits. Additional information about eligibility may be obtained by calling the Department of Veteran Affairs at 1-800- 827-1000.

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

Students pursuing a Master's degree must maintain the following standards:

  1. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better
  2. Only two courses with grades of C can be applied to the degree
  3. No course with a grade below a C will be applied toward a degree
  4. In any graduate degree program, all requirements, including course work at Georgia Southwestern State University, transfer credit and transient credit course work, must be completed within seven (7) calendar years from the date of initial enrollment in course work, without regard to the initial admission status and without regard to credit hours earned.

Graduate students pursuing the Specialist degree must maintain the following academic standards:

  1. Maintain an overall graduate GPA of 3.25
  2. No course with a grade below a B will be applied toward the degree
  3. Only one course with a grade of C may be repeated one time
  4. Degree requirements must be completed within seven (7) calendar years from the time of first enrollment.

Please review other requirements for the School of Education. Students under review or dismissed will follow the same procedures as for the Master's degree.

Each School with a Graduate Program may have other academic requirements; please check the School web site or the appropriate section of the current Bulletin.

STUDENTS UNDER REVIEW

Graduate students who fail to maintain academic standards will be placed under academic review at the end of the semester in which their status falls below the required standards.

  1. Students who have been placed under review will have early registration cancelled for the following semester. These students will not be able to register on-line and must report to their advisor.
  2. The Registrar will send the names of students under review to the Director of Graduate Studies, the Deans of each School, the Department Chairs with graduate courses, and the graduate advisors.
  3. Students under review must meet with their advisor to develop an Individual Remediation Plan (IRP) to demonstrate how the student can be returned to good standing. The plan will be forwarded to the Dean of the School for his or her signature before being placed in the student's file. A copy of the form will also be sent to the Director of Graduate Studies and the Registrar's Office.
  4. At the end of the probationary semester, if the student is not successful in returning to good standing, the Dean of the School, in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies, will send a certified letter of dismissal to the student with a copy to the student's advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the Registrar's Office.
  5. Graduate students who are dismissed from the School may write a letter of appeal within ten class days from the receipt of the dismissal letter to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Students re-admitted on appeal will have one additional semester to return to good academic standing.
  6. Re-admitted students who do not return to good standing after the initial probationary semester will be dismissed from the program and the university.
  7. Dismissed graduate students may re-apply for admission to the program after three calendar years. If the student is re-admitted, he or she must meet all requirements for the degree program at the time of re-enrollment. The years completed prior to dismissal will count towards the total seven (7) years to complete the degree. Re-admission is not automatic. Each application will be considered individually.

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS

All graduate programs offered at Georgia Southwestern State University require 50% of the course work be completed in residence.

GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS

A limited number of Graduate Assistantships are available within the Academic Affairs Division. Application forms are available by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies, Georgia Southwestern State University, 800 Georgia Southwestern State University Drive, Americus, GA 31709-4379. E-mail:acadaff@canes.gsw.edu

Applications should be submitted by April 15 in order to be considered for the following year. Students must be fully admitted to a degree program before Graduate Assistantships can be awarded. International students must hold appropriate visas before applications for Graduate Assistantships can be processed. In addition, Graduate Assistantships may be awarded during an academic year if vacancies occur and if funding is available. Applications are therefore encouraged throughout the year but most will be processed in April.

Graduate Assistants will be assigned to particular Schools or Departments that will specify and supervise responsibilities. They will be expected to maintain a minimum load of nine graduate credit hours each semester. Graduate Assistants will be evaluated each semester, a copy of the evaluation will be sent to the Director of Graduate Studies, and the continuation of the assistantships will depend on satisfactory evaluations.

Assistantships are also available in the Departments of Athletics, Student Affairs, Office of Information and Instructional Technology, and interested students should make direct application to those Departments

ADVISEMENT

Upon admission to the Program of Graduate Studies, each student is assigned an advisor. Advisors in the Master of Education and the Education Specialist programs are assigned by the Dean of the School of Education.

Academic Advisors in the Master's of Business Administration programs are assigned by the Dean of the School of Business. Advisors to students in the Computer Science Master's programs are assigned by the Dean of the School of Computer and Information Sciences.

Students in degree programs should enroll for courses only with the advice and approval of their advisors.

Application for Graduation - Graduate Students

The Application for Graduation for graduate students must be completed one full semester prior to the academic term in which the degree is expected.

Graduation TermApply no later than the date below of the prior semester
FallMay 1
SpringAugust 1
SummerJanuary 1

Transfer Credit

In any graduate program a maximum of 9 semester hours of graduate credit may be transferred from another accredited institution under the following conditions:

  1. No grade less than a B (3.0) may be transferred.
  2. Work must have been completed within the seven-year period allowed for the completion of degree requirements.
  3. Work accepted in transfer to teacher education programs must have the approval of the Dean of the School of Education.
  4. Work accepted in transfer to the Master of Business Administration must have the approval of the Dean of the School of Business.
  5. Work accepted in transfer to the Master of Science in Computer Science must have the approval of the Dean of the School of Computer and Information Sciences.
  6. Work accepted in transfer to the Specialist in Education Degree programs must have been completed by the student while fully admitted as a regular student in a sixth year or doctoral degree program at an accredited college or university and must have the approval of the Dean of the School of Education.
  7. Grades in transfer credits will not be used in calculating the grade point average and do not reduce residence requirements.

Experiential Learning Credit

GSW grants no graduate level credit for experiential learning except under the supervision of the institution.

Correspondence Credit

Under no circumstances may credit earned through correspondence work be used to satisfy graduate degree requirements.

TRANSIENT CREDIT

With approval, a student may take courses as a transient student at another accredited institution and receive credit towards the degree for these courses. Approval is not guaranteed. The "Transient Permission" form found at http://www.gsw.edu/~aaf/student_forms/ must be completed with the appropriate signatures and turned in to the GSW Registrar's Office prior to course enrollment for credit to be awarded. Core Area F and major courses to be taken as transient courses require the approval of the student's dean as well as the student's advisor/chair. Grades earned in courses taken at another institution will not be counted in the student's grade point average at GSW. [Note: Degree candidates may earn credit by correspondence, or through transient credit, but not more than ten hours in the major discipline and not more than thirty total hours of credit earned in this manner will count toward degree requirements.]

Readmission of Former Students

Former students in academic good standing who have not been in attendance for one calendar year or more must reapply through Graduate Admissions. Students who have attended another college since last attending Georgia Southwestern must submit an official transcript from that institution.

Students readmitted or reinstated will be evaluated for graduation from the catalog in effect at the time of readmission or reinstatement or any catalog in effect during subsequent periods of continuous enrollment.

ACADEMIC LOAD LIMITATIONS

Graduate students taking nine or more semester credit hours will be considered full-time. Graduate students may take a maximum of fifteen hours per term. Students taking less than nine semester credit hours will be considered part-time.

GRADING SYSTEM

Grade Point Average for Graduate Students

The grade point average (GPA) for graduate students includes all attempts on all graduate courses. It is a true cumulative GPA.

Policy on Repeating Graduate Courses

Normally, a course is counted only one time for credit hours toward a degree. If a graduate student wants to repeat a course that falls into this category, the student may do so with the understanding that credit hours attempted and quality points earned in all attempts of the course will be counted in the student's grade point average (GPA).

The grading system for graduate courses is as follows:

GradeAchievementQuality Points
AAbove Average4
BAverage3
CUnsatisfactory2
DPoor1
FFailing0
IIncomplete0
WWithdrawn0
WFWithdrawn Failing (same as F)0
WMWithdrawn for Military Purpose0
SSatisfactory0
UUnsatisfactory0
NRNo grade reported by instructor0

A grade of I may be given in extenuating circumstances. If a grade of I is not removed before the end of the following term, it automatically becomes an F.

Students enrolled for thesis or directed study credit will receive an S for satisfactory performance or a U for unsatisfactory performance.

Students who for non-academic reasons stop attending class prior to midterm should withdraw from the course. A grade of "I" cannot be assigned in this situation.

RE-EXAMINATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

Graduate students will not be allowed a retest on any final examination.

ATTENDANCE

Students are expected to attend all classes. If an absence is necessary, the student is responsible for reporting the reason to the instructor; in such cases, each instructor will take whatever action he or she deems necessary. Faculty members will make their absence policies clear to the students enrolled in their classes in writing and within the first week of the semester.

Penalties for excessive absences in each course are set at the beginning of each semester by the faculty member teaching that course. Students with excessive absences in a class may receive a grade of F for the course.

SCHEDULE ADJUSTMENTS

Change in Program

Before a graduate student may transfer from one Teacher Education degree program to another, a request for transfer must be approved by the Dean of the School of Education and the chair of the new program. Students wishing to transfer to or from the Master's of Business Administration or Computer Science Options of the Master of Science Program must have their request approved by the appropriate dean.

Adding or Dropping Courses

Following registration for the term, students may add or drop courses during the published add/drop period.

  • Students must discuss adding or dropping courses with their advisors.
  • Students who enter courses after the first day of class are responsible for making up missed assignments.

After the published add/drop period, students may adjust their schedules only by "withdrawal." (See below.)

Students registered for courses that have the first class meeting after the designated add/drop period will be subject to the withdrawal from class policy or the withdrawal from the university policy below. Any orientation session for online or off-campus courses is considered the first class meeting for the course.

Withdrawal from a Course

After the add/drop period, a student must officially withdraw from a course by completing the "Withdrawal from Class" form available on RAIN or in the Registrar's Office. This form must be returned to the Registrar's Office upon completion. The student is fully responsible for collecting the appropriate signatures and submitting the completed form to the Registrar's Office. The effective date of the withdrawal from class is entered as the received date by the Registrar's Office.

  • Withdrawal from class without penalty requires the student to complete the Withdrawal from Class form and return it to the Registrar's Office by the published no-penalty date of one week after midterm. A student following this procedure will receive a grade of W (Withdrawn).
  • Withdrawal from class without penalty will not be permitted after the published 'no penalty' date except for non-academic reasons. Documentation must be provided by the student to receive a W rather than a WF (Withdrawn Failing).

All withdrawals from class must be approved and completely processed before the last day of classes. A student who does not officially withdraw from a class will receive a grade of F in that course for the term.

Withdrawal from the University

Students withdrawing from all classes and exiting the University after the first day of classes must complete the Withdrawal Form available at Withdrawal from the University for the Semester From The completed form should be submitted to the First Year Advocate or faxed to 229-931-2277. The First Year Advocate is located in Academic Skills, room 126. The effective date of the withdrawal from the University is entered as the date from the Student Withdrawal from the University form.

  • Withdrawal from the University prior to the no-penalty date of one week after midterm will result in grades of W (withdrawn) for all courses.
  • Withdrawal from the University after the no-penalty date will result in grades of WF (withdrawn failing) except for documented non-academic reasons.

All withdrawals from the University must be approved and completely processed before the last day of classes. The student is fully responsible for supplying all pertinent documentation to the Registrar's Office.

ADMINISTRATIVE WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE DURING THE FIRST WEEK OF CLASSES

Students registered for fall or spring or summer terms, which attend none of the class meetings during the first week of classes and do not inform the instructor of their intentions to remain in the course or do not drop the course within the published period, will be administratively withdrawn from the course. It is the responsibility of the faculty member to document such absences.

Students who do not login/participate in the online class by the instructor deadline will be withdrawn from the course and receive a grade of W for withdrawal. No refunds will be issued for nonparticipation withdrawals unless it results in a complete withdrawal from the University.

Instructors must take roll during the first week of classes, until the drop/add period had ended. The faculty member will inform the Registrar of any student who has never attended or participated in the class. This notification should take place during the first week of class.

Students will be contacted through campus email and informed of their withdrawal from the class. Errors are only corrected by emails from the instructor of the class. Students receiving financial aid should be aware that this could negative impact the amount of aid they receive for the term.

POLICY ON ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Students at Georgia Southwestern State University are expected to conform to high standards of intellectual and academic integrity. The University assumes as a basic and minimum standard of conduct that students be honest and that they submit for credit only the product of their own efforts. Scholastic ideals and the need for fairness require that all dishonest work be rejected as a basis for academic credit. They also require that students refrain from all forms of dishonorable conduct in the course of their academic careers.

Dishonest work will be treated as a serious offense by the faculty and administration of Georgia Southwestern. Multiple infractions may be cause for permanent expulsion from the University. An instructor who receives dishonest work from a student has several options. At a minimum, the work should be rejected as a basis for academic credit. At the discretion of the instructor, the student may be given a score of zero on the assignment in question, may be required to rewrite the assignment, may be given a grade of F in the course, may not be recommended for admission to Teacher Education or the Nursing programs, or may be penalized in some intermediate way. If a violation occurs before the last day to withdraw without penalty for the term, students in a course where the instructor's policy calls for a grade of F as the final grade will receive a grade of F for the class regardless of whether they attempt to withdraw. A student found guilty of submitting dishonest work will have this information and the instructor's course of action placed on file in the Office of Academic Affairs so that if future instructors receive dishonest work from that same student, the student may be penalized by the institution, resulting in possible expulsion. Academic integrity violations may be placed on the student's academic transcript. In the event that a student is suspended from the University for violations of academic integrity, courses taken at other institutions while a student is on Academic Suspension from Georgia Southwestern will not be accepted in transfer.

Given the serious nature of infractions of this policy, students have a right to know what constitutes academic dishonesty and have a right to a fair and consistent procedure before severe penalties are imposed. The examples given below are intended to clarify the standards by which academic integrity is judged. They are meant to be illustrative and are not exhaustive. There may be cases which fall outside of these examples and which are deemed unacceptable by the academic community.

Definitions and Examples of Dishonest Behavior

Plagiarism

It is a violation of academic honesty to submit plagiarized work. Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to, asking someone to write part or all of an assignment, copying someone else's work (published or unpublished), inadequately documenting research, downloading material from electronic sources without appropriate documentation, or representing others' works or ideas as the student's own.

The student is responsible for understanding the legitimate and accurate use of sources, the appropriate ways of acknowledging and citing academic, scholarly or creative indebtedness, and the consequences of violating this responsibility.

Cheating on Examinations

It is a violation of academic integrity to cheat on an examination. Cheating on an examination includes, but is not limited to, giving or receiving unauthorized help before, during, or after an in-class or out-of-class examination. Examples of unauthorized help include using unauthorized notes during an examination, viewing another student's exam, and allowing another student to view one's exam.

Unauthorized Collaboration

It is a violation of academic honesty to submit for credit work which is the result of unauthorized collaboration. It is also a violation to provide unauthorized collaboration. Unauthorized collaboration includes giving or receiving unauthorized help for work that is required to be the effort of a single student, such as the receiving or giving of unauthorized assistance in the preparation of any academic or clinical laboratory assignment.

Falsification

It is a violation of academic honesty to falsify information or misrepresent material in an academic work. This includes, but is not limited to, the falsification of citations of sources, the falsification of experimental or survey results, and the falsification of computer or other data.

Multiple Submissions

It is a violation of academic honesty to submit substantial portions of the same work for credit more than once without the explicit consent of the instructor(s) to whom the work is submitted for additional credit. If a work product is to be substantially revised or updated, the student must contact the instructor in advance to discuss necessary revisions. The faculty member may require a copy of the original document for comparison purposes.

Obligations to Report Suspected Violations

Members of the academic community (students, faculty, administration, and staff) are expected to report suspected violations of these standards of academic conduct to the appropriate authority: the instructor, department chair, academic dean, or Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Evidence and Burden of Proof

In determining whether or not academic dishonesty has occurred, the standard which should be used is that guilt must be proven by the instructor with a preponderance of evidence. That is, it should appear to a reasonable and impartial mind that it is more likely than not that academic dishonesty has occurred.

Procedures for Resolving Matters of Academic Dishonesty

When an instructor believes that academic dishonesty has occurred, the instructor will inform the student that academic dishonesty is believed to have taken place. The instructor will explain to the student what the penalties will be should the guilt be proven by a preponderance of evidence. If the student maintains that academic dishonesty did not take place, the student should discuss the matter with the instructor and present evidence (if possible) demonstrating that the work was done in an honest manner. Should the instructor and student not resolve the matter, then they will bring the matter to the Department Chair. If the matter is not resolved at this level, then the matter will be brought to the Academic Dean. If the matter is still unresolved, it will be brought to the Vice President of Academic Affairs. The decision of the Vice President may be appealed to the President, who would then refer it to the Committee on Academic Grievance for its recommendation before rendering a decision. The President's decision is final and binding.

RAIN (Registration and Academic Information Network)

The Registration and Academic Information Network (RAIN) allows students to access their academic and financial records on-line. Students can view holds, midterm grades, final grades, academic transcripts, registration status, class schedules, curriculum sheets, as well as their Financial Aid status, Account Summaries and Fee Assessments. RAIN provides a convenient method for students and faculty to obtain information via the web. It is a secured site which is continually expanding to provide 24 hour access to all students. Information is routinely added to RAIN, including term-specific notices and deadlines. Students must access RAIN to receive grades for all courses since grade mailers are no longer produced. Instructions for access to RAIN can be found at www.gsw.edu or in the Registrar's Office.

THE SEMESTER SYSTEM

The academic year is divided into two semesters (terms) of 15 weeks each and a summer term. New courses are begun each semester; hence, it is possible for students to enter the University at the beginning of any term.

SEMESTER HOURS OF CREDIT

Credit in courses is expressed in semester hours. Normally, a semester hour of credit represents one class hour of work per week for one semester, or an equivalent amount of work in other forms of instruction such as laboratory, studio, or field work. Most of the courses offered by the University meet three times per week for one semester and therefore carry three semester hours of credit.

NUMBERING OF COURSES

Each academic course is designated by numerals. Courses are numbered according to the following plan:

Freshman and Sophomore1000-2999
Junior and Senior3000-4999
Graduate5000-8999
Courses numbered 0001 to 0999 are institutional credit courses.

GRADUATE STUDIES

GRADUATE PROGRAMS AND ADMISSIONS

Students wishing to make application to a graduate program at Georgia Southwestern State Universitymust submit a complete admissions packet. Incomplete application packets will not be reviewed for admissions. Each school may have additional admission requirements as listed on the respective application check lists. The complete admissions packet is comprised of the following:

Students applying for a Master's Degree in Business or Computer Science who already hold a Master's Degree in another area may submit an application packet without test scores. Admission will be granted based on the grade point average earned for the previous Master's Degree. International students in this category must submit TOEFL scores.

Students applying for a Master of Education degree must also include:

  • Proof of eligibility for T-4 certification

Applications to the Education Specialist degree must also include:

  • Proof of eligibility for T-5 certification

* International students must meet additional requirements and should refer to the section below on International Student Admissions

APPLICATION DEADLINES

Complete application packets for the following terms must be received by the deadlines listed below:

Fall admissionMay 31 
Spring admissionOctober 15 
Summer admissionMarch 15 

Georgia Southwestern graduate programs provide advanced study in management, accounting, computer science, and education. The degrees of Education Specialist, Master of Education, Master of Business Administration, and Master of Science in Computer Science may be earned.

Students may earn the Master of Education degree in Curriculum and Instruction with the following tracks: Early Childhood, Special Education and General Content. The Education Specialist degree in Learning and Leading offers the following tracks: Early Childhood, Special Education, and General Content.

The Master of Science in Computer Science degree offers a concentration in Computer Science or Computer Information Systems.

The Master of Business Administration offers the options of taking elective courses in accounting, management, or a combination of courses approved by the MBA advisor.

Admission to graduate studies is a prerequisite for enrollment in graduate courses. Courses numbered 5000 and above are graduate level courses. Education courses numbered 5000-5999 are for certification only. Education courses numbered 6000 to 7999 may be used in fifth year programs. Courses numbered 8000 and above are open only to fully admitted sixth year students. Students lacking the necessary preparation in business must take the appropriate 5000 level courses prior to beginning the Master's program in Business Administration. These courses may not be used to satisfy degree requirements for these programs.

Applicants who do not enroll in the term indicated on the application must inform the appropriate school of their plans and indicate a new date of entrance.

TYPES OF ADMISSION

There are six general types of admission to graduate studies at Georgia Southwestern State University: Regular (without conditions or with conditions), Personal Development, Post Baccalaureate, Transient, and Certificate Program only. The six types are described below.

  • Regular Admission (without conditions).An applicant in this category has completed all the requirements for admission to a specific degree program.
  • Regular Admission (with conditions).An applicant who does not meet all the requirements for admission to a specific degree program may be admitted with the condition that he or she must complete nine (9) hours of graduate credit with a grade no lower than B. At the time the conditions are met, the student's record will be updated to reflect the change to regular admission without condition. If the conditions are not met (a grade lower than B in those nine hours), the student will be expelled from the graduate program.
  • Personal Development.An applicant in this category must have a baccalaureate (undergraduate) degree from an accredited college or university. Graduate courses taken under this category cannot be applied towards a master's degree.
  • Post Baccalaureate. An applicant in this category must have a baccalaureate (undergraduate) degree from an accredited college or university. This type of admission allows one to take graduate courses for credit without pursuing a graduate degree, i.e. satisfying graduate level pre-requisite course requirements, enrolling in coursework to increase the undergraduate grade point average, renewing teacher certification, or pursuing a graduate level certificate which is not a part of degree program. Students who wish to have certificate courses apply toward a degree program must meet admission requirements without condition. Under no circumstances can more than nine semester hours taken under post baccalaureate status be used in a master's degree program.
  • Transient. An applicant who is currently admitted to full graduate standing at another recognized institution may be admitted as a graduate transient student, with permission from the home institution once official transcripts have been received. An applicant for transient admission must submit an application, application fee, official transcripts from the home institution and a letter of transient permission from the appropriate dean of the student's home institution.
  • Certificate Program. An applicant seeking one of the certificate programs offered by the School of Business Administration or the School of Computing and Mathematics must have a minimum of a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university, or the foreign equivalent thereof. Click the appropriate certificate listed under the school for specific admission requirements.

INFORMATION FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

Georgia Southwestern State University welcomes applications from international students to its graduate degree programs.

In addition to requirements for admission to a graduate degree program listed elsewhere in this section, international students must submit the following items:

  1. Certified English translation of original transcripts from each institution previously attended. In cases where there is only one original copy, GSW will inspect the original copy, make a photocopy for the institutional records, and return the original to the applicant. A university/school official, embassy official, the University of Education or the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, must certify English translations. Transcripts cannot be witnessed or verified by a notary public. Photocopies or faxes of evaluations or transcripts are not acceptable.
  2. All official international transcripts must have a foreign credential evaluation completed in English. Applications for this service can be obtained from the Graduate Admissions Office or from the following website:  http://gsw.edu/Academics/International-Student-Programs/index
  3. Certified copies of original diploma, degrees awarded and English translation of diploma, degrees awarded. The issuing institution must certify the degree certificate.
  4. An official report of scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 193 on the computerized test (523 on the paper test) is required for all types of admission to all graduate programs. Applicants who have received degrees from accredited institutions in the U.S. or from institutions in countries where English is the primary language are not usually required to submit TOEFL scores.
  5. A pre-entrance medical form (supplied by the University) completed by the student and a physician.
  6. Proof that the student is covered by a health and accident insurance plan annually.
  7. Upon acceptance into a graduate program, a certified statement from the student's family, bank, or government that finances are available to cover educational expenses for the international student. This statement must be received by Graduate Admissions in order for an I-20 visa to be issued. There are assistantships available to be awarded on a competitive basis to qualified students.

F-1 International Students

Georgia Southwestern State University is part of the Department of Homeland Security's Student Exchange and Visitor Information System (SEVIS). Through this system, the university has become a liaison between GSW international students and a number of government agencies. To meet federal obligations imposed by these agencies, Georgia Southwestern State University is required to report certain personal, academic, and employment related data on international students and scholars to the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration.

Georgia Southwestern State University is dedicated to enabling international students to accomplish their educational goals on our campus so long as the student maintains visa status and abides by the policies of the university. In an effort to assist students with immigration matters, each international student has been assigned a Designated School Official (DSO). All F-1 international students must consult a DSO before making any changes that will affect their immigration status. These changes include, but are not limited to, a change of major, a change of degree program, a change of address, a change of school, etc.

ClassificationDesignated School Official
(DSO)
Graduate StudentsMrs. Lois Oliver,
Assistant Registrar

F-1 international students will be required to attend an international student orientation session at the beginning of each semester. The orientation session will inform and remind students of general international regulations that may affect their stay in the United States. As part of the orientation, students will be issued an International Student Handbook to use as a reference for international questions and concerns.

Maintaining F-1 Visa Status

In order for international students to maintain a valid F-1 Visa status, the following conditions must be met:

  1. Maintain a valid passport at all times.
  2. Attend the University that the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration (BCIS) has authorized you to attend by stamping your I-20 when you entered the U.S., or by being notified of your transfer to another school.
  3. Continue to carry a full course of study (12 hours for undergraduate students, 9 hours for graduate students) each regular semester (fall and spring).
  4. Apply with your Designated School Official promptly for an extension of stay if you are unable to complete your program of study by the ending date on your I-20.
  5. Apply with your Designated School Official for proper documentation to notify BCIS of a change of education level and/or a change in major.
  6. Do not change schools without first contacting your Designated School Official for proper documentation.
  7. Do not engage in any employment without proper authorization.
  8. Limit on-campus employment to 20 hours per week while school is in session.
  9. Report a change of address to the DSO and the Registrar's Office within 10 days of the change.
  10. Carry approved health insurance coverage.
  11. Request travel documents from your DSO in advance of leaving the U.S.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The School of Business Administration is accredited by AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. AACSB accreditation is the hallmark of excellence in business education and has been earned by less than five percent of the world's business schools. AACSB International is located at 777 South Harbour Island Boulevard, Suite 750, Tampa, FL 33602-5730 USA, telephone number 813-769-6500 and fax number 813-769-6559 (www.aacsb.edu).

The School of Business Administration has also received accreditation from the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). The Association is located at 7007 College Boulevard, Suite 420, Overland, KS 66211, USA, telephone number 913-339-9356, and fax number 913-339-6226.

VISION STATEMENT

A premier School of Business Administration within the University System of Georgia offering undergraduate and graduate programs in business.

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the School of Business Administration is to provide its diverse student population quality undergraduate and graduate-level educational programs that produce graduates with the knowledge and skills to help them excel in their business careers, further academic studies, and fulfill their personal potential. The School strives to enhance students' academic experience through relevant faculty teaching activities, community service, applied scholarly endeavors relevant to the southwest Georgia region, and professional activities. This commitment includes abiding by the following standards:

  • Honesty and integrity in interactions and undertakings
  • Respect for the rights, differences, and dignity of others
  • Accountability for personal behavior

THE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM (MBA)

The MBA program has strong business training that integrates knowledge from various functional areas, the expertise of our faculty and the real-world experience of our students. It reinforces strong values, ethics and service and acknowledges the multicultural influences driving today's market. Our program is based on developing key competencies that will help build a lifetime of success. The MBA degree program in business educates students in a broad range of knowledge and skills including finance, ethics, international business, management and marketing as a basis for careers as successful managers. Students achieve knowledge and skills for successful performance in a complex environment requiring intellectual ability to organize work, make and communicate sound decisions, and react successfully to unanticipated events. The program has been designed to promote career development and help students build personal and leadership skills.

The academic program consists of a minimum of 30 graduate semester credit hours in business-related courses. The curriculum consists of eight core courses and two elective courses. In addition, there are several prerequisite foundation courses. For applicants whose undergraduate degrees were in business-related fields, these foundation course prerequisites will typically already have been met.

Applicants whose academic record does not include the foundation courses will be required to complete these prerequisites before being admitted into the MBA program.

APPROACHES TO ASSURANCE OF LEARNING

There are three direct assessment methods to assure that the school is meeting the learning objectives: selection, course-embedded measurement, and stand-alone testing or performance.

The selection process in recruiting students in the School of Business Administration complies with the University standards.

The School of Business Administration uses the following assessment methods:

  • course-embedded measurements
  • standardized tests (ETS Major Field Test)
  • EBI exit survey (indirect method)

GOALS

The learning goals describe the desired educational accomplishments of the MBA degree program. These goals will state the broad educational expectations for the MBA degree program and will specify the intellectual and behavioral competencies the program is intended to instill. By developing operational definitions of the goals and assessing student performance, the school measures its level of success at accomplishing the goals.

General knowledge and skills areas for the MBA program are:

  1. Business Knowledge
  2. Communication (Oral and Written)
  3. Ethical Reasoning
  4. Critical Thinking / Analytical Skills
  5. Globalization and Diversity
  6. Leadership and Teamwork

Based on these knowledge and skills areas the following goals and corresponding objectives are established. The learning objectives for each one of the goals establish the way the learning goals are achieved. At the same time, these objectives describe a measurable attribute of the overall learning goal.

LEARNING GOAL 1: Our graduates will have core business knowledge.

Corresponding Objectives:

  • Our students will apply specific knowledge in business to solve a related problem.

LEARNING GOAL 2: Our graduates will be effective communicators.

Corresponding Objectives:

  • Our students will develop professional quality presentations accompanied by appropriate technology.
  • Our students will produce professional quality business documents.

LEARNING GOAL 3: Our graduates will understand the importance of behaving ethically in their professional lives.

Corresponding Objectives:

  • Our students will identify an ethical dilemma in a scenario case and apply an ethics model to propose and defend a resolution.

LEARNING GOAL 4: Our graduates will demonstrate problem solving skills, supported by appropriate analytical, critical thinking, and quantitative techniques.

Corresponding Objectives:

  • Our students will critically evaluate a particular case and use the appropriate analytical techniques to identify and solve a business problem.

LEARNING GOAL 5: Our graduates will have a global perspective.

Corresponding Objectives:

  • Our students will identify cross-cultural business issues in a case setting and propose appropriate solutions

LEARNING GOAL 6: Our graduates will be able to work in teams and exhibit leadership.

Corresponding Objectives:

  • Our students will demonstrate effective interpersonal and leadership skills in a team setting.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the graduate program in business administration is limited to holders of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution. Admission will be granted only to students showing high promise of success in graduate study. The candidate's performance on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) and the candidate's undergraduate academic record will be used to determine admission status.

The completed application packet, including all supporting documentation, must be received by the Graduate Admissions Office by the deadlines published in the University's academic calendar. Applicants may apply for admittance during any semester.

The formulas to determine the student's admission status are

  1. GMAT score + (200 x the student's undergraduate GPA*) or
  2. GMAT score + (200 x the student's GPA in all upper-division undergraduate courses) or
  3. GRE score + (200 x the student's undergraduate GPA*) or
  4. GRE score + (200 x the student's GPA in all upper-division undergraduate courses)
  5. *Grade Point Average (GPA) is based on a four point scale as reported on the official final transcripts from all institutions attended.

Students applying for a Master's Degree in Business or Computer Science who already hold a Master's Degree in another area may submit an application packet without test scores. Admission will be granted based on the grade point average earned for the previous Master's Degree. International students in this category must submit TOEFL scores.

Regular Admission (without conditions)

Students who score 950 or higher using formula (a) or who score 1,000 or higher using formula (b) or 1,300 or higher using formula (c) or 1,350 or higher using formula (d), and who have fulfilled the prerequisite course requirements will be admitted as a regular graduate student.

EXEMPTIONS: Applicants who have already earned a previous Master's degree are not required to take the GMAT or GRE for admission.

Regular Admission (with conditions)

Students who score 850 or higher using formula (a) or who score 900 or higher using formula (b) or 1,200 or higher using formula (c) or 1,250 or higher using formula (d) will be admitted as conditional graduate students.

To exit conditional status, students must have completed all undergraduate prerequisite course requirements and must have maintained a minimum grade point average of 3.00 with no grade below a "B" in the first 9 semester hours of master's level courses taken while classified as a conditional graduate student. The student may then be admitted as a regular student, subject to the approval by the Dean of the School of Business.

Click HERE to apply to the School of Business Administration.

Academic Standards

Students pursuing a Master's degree must maintain the following standards:

  1. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better
  2. Only two courses with grades of C can be applied to the degree
  3. No course with a grade below a C will be applied toward a degree
  4. In any graduate degree program, all requirements, including course work at Georgia Southwestern State University, transfer credit and transient credit course work, must be completed within seven (7) calendar years from the date of initial enrollment in course work, without regard to the initial admission status and without regard to credit hours earned.

Each School with a Graduate Program may have other academic requirements; please check the School web site or the appropriate section of the current Bulletin.

Students under Review

Graduate students who fail to maintain academic standards will be placed under academic review at the end of the semester in which their status falls below the required standards.

  1. Students who have been placed under review will have early registration cancelled for the following semester. These students will not be able to register on-line and must report to their advisor.
  2. The Registrar will send the names of students under review to the Director of Graduate Studies, the Deans of each School, the Department Chairs with graduate courses, and the graduate advisors.
  3. Students under review must meet with their advisor to develop a remediation plan to demonstrate how the student can be returned to good standing. The plan will be forwarded to the Dean of the School for his or her signature before being placed in the student's file. A copy of the form will also be sent to the Director of Graduate Studies and to the Registrar's Office.
  4. At the end of the probationary semester, if the student is not successful in returning to good standing, the Dean of the School, in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies, will send a certified letter of dismissal to the student with a copy to the student's advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the Registrar's Office.
  5. Graduate students who are dismissed from the School may write a letter of appeal within ten class days from the receipt of the dismissal letter to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Students re-admitted on appeal will have one additional semester to return to good academic standing.
  6. Re-admitted students who do not return to good standing after the initial probationary semester will be dismissed from the program and the university.
  7. Dismissed graduate students may re-apply for admission to the program after three calendar years. If the student is re-admitted, he or she must meet all requirements for the degree program at the time of re-enrollment. The years completed prior to dismissal will count towards the total seven (7) years to complete the degree. Re-admission is not automatic. Each application will be considered individually.

Application for Graduation

Each student admitted to the MBA program must make application for graduation one semester prior to completing degree requirements. Application deadlines are as follows and application forms are available in the Registrar's Office as well as on RAIN.

CURRICULUM

Students pursuing the Master of Business Administration should refer to the attached curriculum sheet and program requirements.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

NOT-FOR-PROFIT (NFP) CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

The certificate program in not-for-profit management is a graduate level certification program. The program intends to provide managers of not-for-profit organizations the management, leadership, and analytical skills necessary for effective management of these organizations.

Admission Requirements

Certificate program applicants may be admitted to pursue up to four (4) graduate courses designated for the NFP certificate program without being admitted to the MBA program at Georgia Southwestern State University. These students are categorized as Certificate Admission students.

To be granted Certificate Admission status, a student must have a U.S. bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university, or the foreign equivalent thereof. Certificate Admission students must continuously maintain a GPA of 3.0 or better to remain in the program.

To be admitted to the MBA program after completing a certificate program, a student must meet the admission requirements for the MBA. These students may use all four courses taken in the NFP certificate program to meet the requirements for the MBA program.

Students pursuing the NFP certificate should refer to the attached curriculum sheet and program requirements.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

SCHOOL OF COMPUTING AND MATHEMATICS

THE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM

Georgia Southwestern State University grants the degree Master of Science in Computer Science with options in Computer Science and Computer Information Systems.

These Master of Science degree programs are designed to serve two purposes:

  • As a "Professional" program allowing computer professionals in industry to upgrade their skills.
  • As an "Academic" program allowing capable computer scientists to prepare for the terminal degree.

These programs are an excellent foundation for a career in industry or academia.

The academic program consists of a minimum of 36 graduate semester credit hours. The curriculum consists of eight core courses and four elective courses. Students will have the option of selecting their elective courses in computer science, computer information system, or a combination of the courses. In addition, there are several prerequisite foundation courses. For applicants whose undergraduate degrees are in computer related fields, these foundation course prerequisites will typically already have been met.

Applicants whose academic record does not include the foundation courses will be required to complete these prerequisites before being admitted into the graduate program as a regular student.

Admission Requirements

The completed application packet, including all supporting documentation, must be received by the Graduate Admissions Office by the deadlines published in the University's academic calendar. Applicants may apply for admittance during any semester.

Regular Admission (without conditions)

Students who meets following admission requirements and who have fulfilled the prerequisite course requirements will be admitted as a regular graduate student.

  1. An undergraduate degree from an accredited college.
  2. A minimum of 2.5 undergraduate grade point average (GPA) based on a 4.0 scale as reported on the official final transcripts from all institutions attended.
  3. A minimum of 3.0 GPA on all previous graduate work attempted.
  4. A minimum total of 800 on the verbal and quantitative subtests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
  5. Three letters of reference.

EXEMPTIONS: Applicants who have earned a master's degree from an accredited university are exempted from a requirement of a GRE score and can be admitted into the program based on a graduate GPA.

Regular Admission (with conditions)

Students seeking a degree through graduate study who do not meet the requirements for regular admission without conditions may be admitted with conditions. Students who meet the following admission requirements will be admitted as conditional graduate students.

  1. An undergraduate degree from an accredited college.
  2. A minimum of 2.2 but less than 2.5 undergraduate grade point average (GPA) based on a 4.0 scale as reported on the official final transcripts from all institutions attended.
  3. A minimum of 2.75 but less than 3.0 graduate grade point average (GPA) based on a 4.0 scale as reported on the official final transcripts from all institutions attended.
  4. A minimum total of 800 on the verbal and quantitative subtests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
  5. Three letters of reference.

To exit conditional status, students must have completed all undergraduate prerequisite course requirements and must have maintained a minimum grade point average of 3.00 with no grade below a "B" in the first 9 semester hours of master's level courses taken while classified as a conditional graduate student. The student may then be admitted as a regular student, subject to the approval by the Dean of the School of Computing and Mathematics.

EXEMPTIONS: Applicants who have earned a master's degree from an accredited university are exempted from a requirement of a GRE score and can be admitted into the program based on a graduate GPA.

ONLINE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

The primary goal of this program is to provide opportunity to large numbers of students who wish to pursue master program and are looking for fully online degree program. Employees of a number of local and regional employers have sought convenience of attending university while taking a full time employment.

Admission Requirements

All requirements for admission to the Online Graduate Program are same as those mentioned above for the on-campus degree program.

EXEMPTIONS: Applicants who have earned a master's degree from an accredited university are exempted from a requirement of a GRE score and can be admitted into the program based on a graduate GPA.

ONLINE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CIS)

The primary goal of this program is to give instructors from two-year colleges and technical colleges the opportunity to obtain 18 hours of graduate course work in their teaching field (CIS). The program was created for instructors, but not limited only to them. The certificate program includes courses like Data Mining, Distributed Web Applications, etc. which reflects a current industry trend.

Admission Requirements

All requirements for admission to the Online Graduate Certificate Program in CIS are same as those mentioned above for the on-campus degree program.

EXEMPTIONS: Applicants who have earned a master's degree from an accredited university are exempted from a requirement of a GRE score and can be admitted into the program based on a graduate GPA.

Click HERE to apply to any of the above programs in the School of Computing and Mathematics

Academic Standards

Students pursuing a Master's degree must maintain the following standards:

  1. A 3.0 cumulative GPA on a 4.0 scale
  2. A maximum of 6 credit hours with a grade of "C" may be used to satisfy program requirements.
  3. No courses with a grade of "D" may be used to satisfy program requirements.
  4. In any graduate degree program, all requirements, including course work at Georgia Southwestern State University, transfer credit and transient credit course work, must be completed within seven (7) calendar years from the date of initial enrollment in course work, without regard to the initial admission status and without regard to credit hours earned.

Graduate students who fail to maintain academic standards will be placed under academic review at the end of the semester in which their status falls below the required standards.

Students under Review

  1. Students who have been placed under review will have early registration cancelled for the following semester. These students will not be able to register on-line and must report to their advisor.
  2. The Registrar will send the names of students under review to the Director of Graduate Studies, the Deans of each School, the Department Chairs with graduate courses, and the graduate advisors.
  3. Students under review must meet with their advisor to develop a remediation plan to demonstrate how the student can be returned to good standing. The plan will be forwarded to the Dean of the School for his or her signature before being placed in the student's file. A copy of the form will also be sent to the Director of Graduate Studies and to the Registrar's Office.
  4. At the end of the probationary semester, if the student is not successful in returning to good standing, the Dean of the School, in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies, will send a certified letter of dismissal to the student with a copy to the student's advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the Registrar's Office.
  5. Graduate students who are dismissed from the School may write a letter of appeal within ten class days from the receipt of the dismissal letter to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Students re-admitted on appeal will have one additional semester to return to good academic standing.
  6. Re-admitted students who do not return to good standing after the initial probationary semester will be dismissed from the program and the university.
  7. Dismissed graduate students may re-apply for admission to the program after three calendar years. If the student is re-admitted, he or she must meet all requirements for the degree program at the time of re-enrollment. The years completed prior to dismissal will count towards the total seven (7) years to complete the degree. Re-admission is not automatic. Each application will be considered individually.

Students pursuing a Master's Degree in Computer Science should refer to the attached curriculum sheet and program requirements.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements for MS (Computer Science).

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements for Online MS (Computer Science).

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements for Online Graduate Certificate in CIS.

Application for Graduation

Each student admitted to the MS (CS) program must make application for graduation one semester prior to completing degree requirements. Application deadlines are as follows and application forms are available in the Registrar's Office as well as on RAIN.

Graduation TermApply no later than the date below of the prior semester
FallMay 1
SpringAugust 1
SummerJanuary 1

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION PROGRAMS

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the School of Education is to prepare effective teachers who demonstrate the essential knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to promote student achievement.

The School of Education is committed to:

  1. Developing leaders in education who have the essential knowledge, skills, and dispositions to make skilled, reflective decisions and who view student learning as the focus for their work.
  2. Motivating life-long learning to adapt to the evolving needs of a global society and its diverse populations through high quality programs based upon exemplary instruction, knowledge of content, emergent technologies, and relevant research.
  3. Developing candidates who accurately assess, reflect and make appropriate decisions about instruction resulting in achievement for all learners.
  4. Professional collaboration with families, schools, community partners, and others to improve the preparation of candidates and the effectiveness of practicing teachers.

The School of Education endorses the mission statement of Georgia Southwestern State University and envisions its mission within the context of those principles.

MASTER OF EDUCATION PROGRAM

Georgia Southwestern State University offers graduate study leading to the Master of Education degree for students seeking advancement in careers, additional study in a chosen field, greater personal satisfaction and financial rewards.

Holders of graduate degrees are in a favorable market for prime positions in education and education-related careers.

Student Learning Outcomes

The Master of Education degree program is designed to produce teachers who demonstrate:

  1. a commitment to pupils and pupil learning.
  2. knowledge of the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects to pupils.
  3. a responsibility for managing and monitoring pupil learning.
  4. evaluation of their practice and learning from their experiences.
  5. their commitment as members of learning communities.

The Master of Education degree program requires a minimum of thirty-three semester hours of course work, including teaching field courses, professional core courses, seminars and practica.

Admission Requirements for the Master of Education Program

Students seeking a degree through graduate study must apply for regular admission. Individuals who already hold a master's degree must meet regular admissions requirements for a second master's degree. Requirements for regular admission follow:

Regular Admission (without conditions)

  1. Undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university
  2. Eligibility for Clear Renewable Georgia T-4 teaching certificate.
  3. A minimum of 2.5 undergraduate grade point average as reported on the official final transcripts from all accredited institutions attended.
  4. Two confidential Administrative Recommendation Forms) one from a Supervising Principal and one from another school administrator (Assistant Principal, Department Chair, Lead Teacher.

    Applicants meeting minimum requirements for regular admission (without conditions) will be considered. Acceptance is not guaranteed. The School of Education seeks the most qualified applicants for its graduate degree cohort programs.

NOTE: There is no Regular Admissions (with conditions) to the Master of Education degree program.

Those students denied admission may submit an appeal of the decision to the Dean of the School of Education.

Click HERE to apply to the School of Education

Academic Standards (Master of Education)

Candidates for the Master of Education degree must meet the following standards.

  1. A 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale is required in all courses attempted to satisfy degree requirements.
  2. Not more than 6 hours with a grade of C may be used to satisfy degree requirements.
  3. A grade of D may not be used to satisfy degree requirements.
  4. In any graduate degree program, all degree requirements must be completed within seven (7) calendar years from the date of initial enrollment in course work, without regard to the initial admission status and without regard to credit hours earned.
  5. A grade of I may be given in extenuating circumstances. If a grade of I is not removed before the end of the following semester, it automatically becomes an F.

Students under Review

Graduate students who fail to maintain academic standards will be placed under academic review at the end of the semester in which their status falls below the required standards.

  1. Students who have been placed under review will have early registration cancelled for the following semester. These students will not be able to register on-line and must report to their advisor.
  2. The Registrar will send the names of students under review to the Director of Graduate Studies, the Deans of each School, the Department Chairs with graduate courses, and the graduate advisors.
  3. Students under review must meet with their advisor to develop an Individual Remediation Plan (IRP) to demonstrate how the student can be returned to good standing. The plan will be forwarded to the Dean of the School for his or her signature before being placed in the student's file. A copy of the form will also be sent to the Director of Graduate Studies and to the Registrar's Office.
  4. At the end of the probationary semester, if the student is not successful in returning to good standing, the Dean of the School, in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies, will send a certified letter of dismissal to the student with a copy to the student's advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the Registrar's Office.
  5. Graduate students who are dismissed from the School may write a letter of appeal within ten class days from the receipt of the dismissal letter to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Students re-admitted on appeal will have one additional semester to return to good academic standing.
  6. Re-admitted students who do not return to good standing after the initial probationary semester will be dismissed from the program and the university.
  7. Dismissed graduate students may re-apply for admission to the program after three calendar years. If the student is re-admitted, he or she must meet all requirements for the degree program at the time of re-enrollment. The years completed prior to dismissal will count towards the total seven (7) years to complete the degree. Re-admission is not automatic. Each application will be considered individually.

Application for Graduation (Master of Education)

Each student admitted to the Master of Education program must file an application for graduation one semester prior to completing degree requirements. Application deadlines are as follows and application forms are available in the Registrar's Office as well as on RAIN.

Graduation TermApply no later than the date below of the prior semester
FallMay 1
SpringAugust 1
SummerJanuary 1

Graduate Programs

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

The Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction offers the following tracks: Early Childhood, Special Education, and General Content.

Early Childhood Education Track. This track is for individuals who hold Clear Renewable Georgia T4 teacher certification in Early Childhood.
Special Education Track. This track is for individuals who hold Clear Renewable Georgia T4 teacher certification in Special Education.
General Content Track. This track is for individuals who hold Clear Renewable Georgia T4 teacher certification in fields other than Early Childhood and Special Education.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements (Master of Education).

For positions of leadership in teaching, for advanced knowledge in the field, and personal and professional enrichment, the Education Specialist degrees provides an avenue for opportunities in public and private school systems, two-year colleges and various agencies.

Student Learning Outcomes

The Education Specialist degree program is designed to produce teachers who:

  1. are committed to pupils and their learning.
  2. know the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects to pupils.
  3. are responsible for managing and monitoring pupil learning.
  4. think systematically about their practice and learn from experience.
  5. are members of learning communities.

The Education Specialist degree program requires a minimum of thirty semester hours of course work, including professional core courses, seminars, and practica.

Admission Requirements

  1. Master's degree from an accredited college or university.
  2. Eligibility for Clear Renewable Georgia T-5 teaching certificate.
  3. A minimum of 3.00 overall graduate grade point average as reported on the official final transcripts from all accredited institutions attended.
  4. A minimum of one year acceptable teaching experience.
  5. Submission of scores from the Graduate Records Exam (GRE). A minimum of 3.5 on the Writing portion is required.
  6. Two confidential Administrative Recommendation Forms (one from a Supervising Principal and one from another school administrator (Assistant Principal, Department Chair, Lead Teacher).

 

Applicants meeting minimum requirements for regular admission (without conditions) will be considered. Acceptance is not guaranteed. The School of Education seeks the most qualified applicants to its graduate degree cohort programs.

NOTE: There is no Regular Admission (With Conditions) to the Education Specialist degree program.

Those students denied admission may submit an appeal of the decision to the Dean of the School of Education.

Click HERE to apply to the School of Education

Academic Standards

Candidates for the Education Specialist degree must meet the following standards:

  1. A 3.25 grade point average on a 4.0 scale is required in all courses attempted to satisfy degree requirements.
  2. No grade less than a B may be used to satisfy degree requirements.
  3. A student who earns two grades of C or less will be dropped from the program.
  4. A course where the student earned a C or less may be repeated only once.
  5. In any graduate degree program, all degree requirements must be completed within seven (7) calendar years from the date of initial enrollment in course work, without regard to the initial admission status and without regard to credit hours earned.

Students under Review

Graduate students who fail to maintain academic standards will be placed under academic review at the end of the semester in which their status falls below the required standards.

  1. Students who have been placed under review will have early registration cancelled for the following semester. These students will not be able to register on-line and must report to their advisor.
  2. The Registrar will send the names of students under review to the Director of Graduate Studies, the Deans of each School, the Department Chairs with graduate courses, and the graduate advisors.
  3. Students under review must meet with their advisor to develop an Individual Remediation Plan (IRP) to demonstrate how the student can be returned to good standing. The plan will be forwarded to the Dean of the School for his or her signature before being placed in the student's file. A copy of the form will also be sent to the Director of Graduate Studies and to the Registrar's Office.
  4. At the end of the probationary semester, if the student is not successful in returning to good standing, the Dean of the School, in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies, will send a certified letter of dismissal to the student with a copy to the student's advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the Registrar's Office.
  5. Graduate students who are dismissed from the School may write a letter of appeal within ten class days from the receipt of the dismissal letter to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Students re-admitted on appeal will have one additional semester to return to good academic standing.
  6. Re-admitted students who do not return to good standing after the initial probationary semester will be dismissed from the program and the university.
  7. Dismissed graduate students may re-apply for admission to the program after three calendar years. If the student is re-admitted, he or she must meet all requirements for the degree program at the time of re-enrollment. The years completed prior to dismissal will count towards the total seven (7) years to complete the degree. Re-admission is not automatic. Each application will be considered individually.

Application for Graduation (Education Specialist)

Each student admitted to a Specialist in Education program must make application for graduation one semester prior to completing degree requirements. Application deadlines are as follows and application forms are available in the Registrar's Office as well as on RAIN.

Graduation TermApply no later than the date below of the prior semester
FallMay 1
SpringAugust 1
SummerJanuary 1

Specialist Programs

EDUCATION SPECIALIST IN LEARNING AND LEADING

For positions of leadership in teaching, for advanced knowledge in the field, and personal and professional enrichment, the Education Specialist degree provides an avenue for opportunities in public and private school systems, two-year colleges and various agencies.

The Education Specialist Degree in Learning and Leading offers the following tracks: Early Childhood, Special Education, and General Content.

Early Childhood Education Track. This track is for individuals who hold Clear Renewable Georgia T5 teacher certification in Early Childhood.
Special Education Track. This track is for individuals who hold Clear Renewable Georgia T5 teacher certification in Special Education.
General Content Track. This track is for individuals who hold Clear Renewable Georgia T5 teacher certification in fields other than Early Childhood and Special Education.

Student Learning Outcomes

The Education Specialist degree program is designed to produce teachers who:

  • are committed to pupils and their learning.
  • know the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects to pupils.
  • are responsible for managing and monitoring pupil learning.
  • think systematically about their practice and learn from experience.
  • are members of learning communities.

The Education Specialist degree program requires a minimum of thirty semester hours of course work, including professional core courses, seminars, and practica.

Admission Requirements

  • Master's degree from an accredited college or university.
  • Eligibility for Clear Renewable Georgia T-5 teaching certificate.
  • A minimum of 3.00 overall graduate grade point average as reported on the official final transcripts from all accredited institutions attended.
  • A minimum of one year acceptable teaching experience.
  • Submission of scores from the Graduate Records Exam (GRE). A minimum of 3.5 on the Writing portion is required.
  • Two confidential Administrative Recommendation Forms (one from a Supervising Principal and one from another school administrator (Assistant Principal, Department Chair, Lead Teacher).

Applicants meeting minimum requirements for regular admission (without conditions) will be considered. Acceptance is not guaranteed. The School of Education seeks the most qualified applicants for its graduate degree cohort programs.

NOTE: There is no Regular Admission (With Conditions) to the Education Specialist degree program.

Those students denied admission may submit an appeal of the decision to the Dean of the School of Education.

Click HERE to apply to the School of Education

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Specific Course Requirements (Specialist in Education).

THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA

The University System of Georgia includes all state-operated institutions of higher education in Georgia-4 research universities, 2 regional universities, 13 state universities, 15 associate degree colleges. These 34 public institutions are located throughout the state.

A 15-member constitutional Board of Regents governs the University System, which has been in operation since 1932. Appointments of Board members are made by the Governor, subject to confirmation by the State Senate. Regular terms of Board members are seven years.

The Chair, Vice Chair, and other officers of the Board of Regents are elected by the members of the Board. The Chancellor, who is not a Board member, is the chief executive officer of the Board and the chief administrative officer of the University System.

The overall programs and services of the University System are offered through three major components: Instruction; Public Service/ Continuing Education; Research.

INSTRUCTION consists of programs of study leading toward degrees, ranging from the associate (two-year) level to the doctoral level, and certificates.

Standards for admission of students to instructional programs at each institution are determined, pursuant to policies of the Board of Regents, by the institution. The Board establishes minimum standards and leaves to each institution the prerogative to establish higher standards. Applications for admission should be addressed to the institutions.

PUBLIC SERVICE/CONTINUING EDUCATION consists of non-degree activities, primarily, and special types of college degree-credit courses. The non-degree activities include short courses, seminars, conferences, and consultative and advisory services in many areas of interest. Typical college degree-credit courses are those offered through extension center programs and teacher education consortiums.

RESEARCH encompasses scholarly investigations conducted for discovery and application of knowledge. Most of the research is conducted through the research universities; however, some of it is conducted through several of the regional and state universities. The research investigations cover matters related to the educational objectives of the institutions and to general social needs.

The policies of the Board of Regents provide a high degree of autonomy for each institution. The executive head of each institution is the President, whose election is recommended by the Chancellor and approved by the Board.

BOARD OF REGENTS

University System of Georgia
270 Washington Street, S.W., Atlanta 30334-1450
Members of the Board of Regents

 Term Expires
Kenneth R. Bernard, Jr, Douglasville2014
James A. Bishop, Brunswick2011
Hugh A. Carter, Jr., Atlanta2009
William H. Cleveland, Atlanta - Chair2009
Robert Hatcher, Macon2013
Felton Jenkins, Madison2013
W. Mansfield Jennings, Jr., Hawkinsville2010
James R. Jolly, Dalton2015
Donald M. Leebern, Jr., Atlanta2012
Eldridge W. McMillan, Atlanta2010
William NeSmith, Jr., Athens2015
Doreen S. Poitevint, Bainbridge2011
Willis J. Potts Jr., Rome2013
Wanda Yancey Rodwell, Stone Mountain2012
Kessel Stelling, Jr., Alpharetta2015
Benjamin Tarbutton III, Sandersville2013
Richard L. Tucker, Lawrenceville2012
Allan Vigil, Morrow - Chair2010

University System Office Administrative Personnel
of the Board of Regents

Dr. Errol B. Davis, Jr., Chancellor
Ms. Demetra Morgan, Executive Assistant to the Chancellor
Mr. Rob Watts, Chief Operating Officer
Ms. Julia Murphy, Secretary to the Board
Ms. Lyndell Robinson, Associate Secretary to the Board
Mr. Ronald B. Stark, Associate Vice Chancellor, Internal Audit
Ms. Elizabeth E. Neely, Associate Vice Chancellor, Legal Affairs
Mr. J. Burns Newsome, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Legal Affairs (Prevention)
Mr. Daryl Griswold, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Legal Affairs (Contracts)
Ms. Dorothy Roberts, Interim Associate Vice Chancellor for Human Resources
Dr. Lamar Veatch, Asst. Vice Chancellor, Georgia Public Library Service
Ms. Linda M. Daniels, Vice Chancellor, Facilities
Mr. Peter J. Hickey, Acting Asst. Vice Chancellor, Design & Construction
Ms. Sharon Brittain, Acting Vice Chancellor, Design & Construction
Mr. Alan Travis, Director, Planning
Mr. Mark Demyanek, Director, Environmental Safety
Mr. William Bowes, Vice Chancellor, Office of Fiscal Affairs
Ms. Usha Ramachandran, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Fiscal Affairs
Mr. David Dickerson, Asst. Budget Director
Ms. Sherea Frazier, Executive Director, Human Resources, Payroll and Benefits
Ms. Debra Lasher, Executive Director, Business & Financial Affairs
Mr. Mike McClearn, Director, University System Purchasing
Ms. Shannon South, Assistant Director, Financial Systems & Services
Dr. Beheruz N. Sethna, Interim Senior Vice Chancellor, Office of Academic & Fiscal Affairs
Dr. Sandra Stone, Vice Chancellor, Academic Planning and Programs
Dr. Daniel W. Rahn, M.D., Sr. Vice Chancellor, Hlth & Medical Programs & President MCG
Dr. Bettie Horne, Interim Vice Chancellor for Faculty Affairs
Ms. Tonya Lam, Associate Vice Chancellor, Student Affairs
Ms. Marci Middleton, Director, Academic Program Coordination
Dr. Jan Kettlewell, Associate Vice Chancellor, P-16 Initiatives, Exec. Dir., USG Foundation
Dr. Dorothy Zinsmeister, Asst. Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs/Assoc. Dir. For Higher Education, PRISM Initiative
Dr. Richard C. Sutton, Senior Advisor for Academic Affairs and Director, International Programs
Dr. Cathie M. Hudson, Associate Vice Chancellor, Strategic Research & Analysis
Dr. Anoush Pisani, Senior Research Associate
Dr. Susan Campbell, Policy Research Associate
Dr. Tom Maier, Interim Vice Chancellor, Information & Instructional Technology,/CIO
Mr. Jim Flowers, Special Assistant to the CIO
Dr. Kris Biesinger, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Advanced Learning Technologies
Ms. Diane Chubb, Assoc. Director, Special Projects
Dr. Brian Finnegan, Director, Emerging Instructional Technologies
Dr. Catherine Finnegan, Director, Assessment & Public Information
Dr. Michael Rogers, Assoc. Director, Instructional Design & Development
Mr. David Disney, Director, Customer Services
Mr. John Graham, Executive Director, Enterprise Application Systems
Mr. Matthew Kuchinski, Director, System Office Systems Support
Mr. Ray Lee, Director, Information & Web Services
Ms. Merryll Penson, Executive Director, Library Services
Mr. John Scoville, Executive Director, Enterprise Infrastructure Services
Dr. Jessica Somers, Exec. Director, Academic Innovation
Ms. Lisa Striplin, Director, Administrative Services
Mr. Tom Daniel, Senior Vice Chancellor, Office of External Activities
Ms. Joy Hymel, Asst. Vice Chancellor, Office of Economic Development
Ms. Terry Durden, Director, ICAPP Operations
Mr. John Millsaps, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Media & Publications
Ms. Diane Payne, Director, Publications

HEADS OF THE INSTITUTION

1907-1908W. C. Acree, Principal, Third District Agricultural and Mechanical School
1908-1921John M. Collum, Principal, Third District Agricultural and Mechanical School
1921-1934John Monroe Prance, Georgia Southwestern College
 1921-1926 Principal, Third District Agricultural and Mechanical School
 1926-1932 President, Agricultural and Normal College
 1932-1934 President, Georgia Southwestern College
1934-1948Peyton Jacob, President, Georgia Southwestern College
1948-1950Henry King Stanford, President, Georgia Southwestern College
1950-1963Lloyd A. Moll, President, Georgia Southwestern College
1963-1978William B. King, President, Georgia Southwestern College
1978-1979Harold T. Johnson, Acting President, Georgia Southwestern College
1979-1995William H. Capitan, President, Georgia Southwestern College
1996-1996Joan M. Lord, Acting President, Georgia Southwestern College
1996-2007Michael L. Hanes, President, Georgia Southwestern State University
2007-Kendall A. Blanchard, President, Georgia Southwestern State University

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

Kendall A. BlanchardPresident
Brian U. AdlerProfessor and Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty
W. Cody KingVice President for Business and Finance
Samuel T. MillerVice President for Student Affairs
Jaclyn E. KaylorDirector of Athletics
Janet L. SidersDirector of Human Resources and Affirmative Action Officer
ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL
A. Randolph BarksdaleSpecial Assistant to the President
Richard C. BirkelExecutive Director of the Rosalynn Carter Institute
Annie BrownDirector of Student Health Services
Angela V. BryantDirector of Student Financial Aid
Oris W. Bryant, Jr.Director of Public Safety
Gaynor G. CheokasDirector of the Center for Business and Economic Development
Arthur B. ClarkDirector of Environmental Health & Safety
Kim ComerAlumni Affairs Coordinator/Gifts Processor
Lisa A. CooperDirector of Institutional Research
Joshua CurtinDirector of Campus Life
Sandra DanielDean, School of Nursing
Brenda DavisStaff Benefits Manager, Human Resources
Amber DeBaiseDirector of Auxiliary Services
Robyn DeVaneDatabase Administrator
Timothy FairclothSystems Administrator
Etrat FathiDirector of Career Services Center
Cara Lea FowlerFirst Year Advocate
John FoxDirector of International Student Programs
David L. GarrisonDean, College of Arts and Sciences
Katrina GuestPostal Service Supervisor
Royce W. HackettDirector of Information and Instructional Technology
Gaye S. HayesVice President for Enrollment Management
Angela HobbsDirector of Intramural and Recreational Sports
Karen HollowayDirector, Alumni Affairs and Continuing Education
LaKeisha JacksonDirector, Residence Life
Linda P. JonesDirector of Academic Skills Center
Alma G. KeitaDirector of Counseling Services
John G. KootiDean, School of Business Administration and Project Manager
Lynn P. LarsenDirector of Georgia Youth Science and Technology
Raymond P. MannilaTheatre Technical Coordinator
Jeff HallComptroller
Shaun M. MurieDirector of Professional Golf Management Program
Boris V. PeltsvergerDean, School of Computing and Mathematics
Lynda Lee PurvisDean for Academic Services and Special Programs
Jan K. RogersDirector of Student Accounts
Nancy RooksDirector of Procurement
Darcy L. SchraufnagelAssistant Dean of Students
George L. SmithDirector of Physical Plant
Krista P. SmithRegistrar
Stephen E. SnyderPublic Relations Director/Development Officer
John T. Spencer, Jr.Director of Student Support Services
Michael D. TracyAssociate Director Public Safety
Janis WarrenDirector of Materials Management
Lettie J. WatfordDean, School of Education
Vera WeisskopfDean of James Earl Carter Library

FACULTY

Simon S. Baev (2009-2010)Assistant Professor, Computer Science
BS, MS, South Ural State University; MS, PhD, University of Alabama in Huntsville
Ian M. Brown (2007-2012)Assistant Professor, Biology
BS, PhD, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
Queen H. Brown (2008-2013)Assistant Professor, Middle Grades
BS,MEd, Georgia Southwestern State University; EdS, Albany State University; EdD, Georgia Southern University
Sandra D. Daniel (2009-2010)Professor and Dean, School of Nursing
BSN, Georgia Southwestern College; MSN, Valdosta State College; PhD, Medical College of Georgia
Bryan P. Davis (2007-2012)Assistant Dean for Assessment, Curriculum and Special Projects, and Professor, English
BA, University of Dayton; MA, Wright State University; PhD, Ohio State University
Julia J. Dorminey (2008-2013)Associate Professor, Early Childhood Education
BS, MS, EdS, Valdosta State College; PhD, Florida State University
Leisa R. Easom (2009-2010)Department Chair and Professor, Nursing, RCI Eminent Scholar
BSN, MSN, Valdosta State University; PhD, Medical College of Georgia
Margaret A. Ellington (2007-2012)Department Chair and Associate Professor, English and Modern Languages
BS, Weber State University; MS, PhD, Utah State University
McLowery Elrod (2009-2010) 
 
M. Michael Fathi (2007-2012)Professor, Technology Management
BS, University of Jundi; MBA, University of Baltimore; DBA, Nova Southeastern University
David L. Garrison (2007-2012)Professor of English and Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
BA, Appalachian State University; MA, Baylor University; PhD, University of Minnesota
Jeffrey Green (2009-2010)Department Chair and Professor, Dramatic Arts
BS, MFA, Ohio University
Richard C. Hall (2007-2012)Professor of History
BA, Vanderbilt University; MA, PhD, Ohio State University
Stephanie G. Harvey (2009-2010)Assistant Professor, Biology
BA, Wesleyan College; MS, Georgia College and State University, Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Greg M. Hawver (2007-2012)Professor and Department Chair, Middle Grades and Secondary Education, Health and Human Performance
BSE, Georgia Southern University; MEd, Georgia Southwestern College; EdD, University of Mississippi
Robert E. Herrington (2009-2010)Department Chair and Professor, Biology
BA, University of Evansville; MS, Georgia College; PhD, Washington State University
Curtis C. Howell (2006-2011)Associate Professor, Accounting
BS, MAS, EdD, Northern Illinois University
Charles M. Huffman (2009-2010)Associate Professor, Psychology
BA, Buena Vista College; MS, Emporia State University; PhD, University of Southern Mississippi
Nedialka I. Iordanova (2009-2010)Associate Professor, Chemistry
MS, Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski; PhD, Pennsylvania State University
John G. Kooti (2007-2012)Professor and Dean, Business Administration
MS, PhD, Michigan State University
Elizabeth A. Kuipers (2007-2012)Associate Professor, English
B.A., Wesleyan College; M.A., Ph.D., Auburn
Eric M. Laughlin (2009-2010)Assistant Professor, Music
BM, University of North Alabama; MM, University of Memphis; DMA, University of South Carolina
Jamie I. MacLennan (2009-2010)Assistant Professor, Sociology
MA, PhD, Rutgers State University at New Brunswick
Cecilia M. Maldonado (2009-2014)Assistant Professor, Marketing
BS, Tecnologico de Monterrey; MS, Texas A & M; PhD, University of Texas, Pan American
J. YeVette McWhorter (2007-2012)Department Chair and Professor, Reading
BS, Austin Peay State University; MA, University of New Mexico; EdD, University of Georgia
Samuel T. Peavy (2007-2012)Department Chair and Associate Professor, Geology
B.S., McNeese State University; M.Sc., Memorial University of Newfoundland; Ph.D., Virginia Tech
Boris V. Peltsverger (2007-2012)Professor and Dean, Computing and Mathematics
 M.S.E.E., Ph.D., Chelyabinsk State Technical University
Arvind C. Shah (2007-2012)Department Chair and Professor, Computer Science
 M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia
Michele L. Smith (2009-2010)Associate Professor and Chair, Chemistry
BS, Wilson College; PhD, Auburn University
Judith W. Spann (2007-2012)Assistant Dean for Accreditation and Professor, Special Education
BS, MEd, West Georgia College; PhD, Florida State University
Gabriele U. Stauf (2007-2012)Professor, English
BS, Texas Lutheran College; MA, Southwest Texas State University; PhD, Florida State University
John S. Stovall (2008-2013)Assistant Professor, Marketing
BS, MBA, PhD, University of Illinois at Chicago
John J. Stroyls (2009-2014)Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Mathematics
AB, West Virginia University; PhD, State University of New York at Buffalo
Philip I. Szmedra (2008-2013)Associate Professor, Economics
BA, Pennsylvania State University; MS, PhD, University of Georgia
Anh-Hue Thi Tu (2009-2010)Associate Professor, Biology
AA, Jefferson State Community College; BS, Baylor University; PhD, Texas A & M Health Science Center
Dawn B. Valentine (2008-2013)Associate Professor, Marketing
BS, University of North Alabama; MS, University of Alabama at Huntsville; PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Randall C. Valentine (2008-2013)Assistant Professor, Finance
BS, Arkansas State University; MS, Mississippi State University, Ph.D, Mississippi State University
Milton Jeffrey Waldrop (2007-2012)Associate Professor, English
BA, MA, Florida State University; PhD, University of Mississippi
Lettie J. Watford (2007-2012)Dean of the School of Education and Associate Professor, Middle Grades and Secondary Education
BA, Tift College; MEd, Georgia Southwestern College; EdS, PhD, University of Georgia
Thomas J. Weiland (2007-2012)Professor, Geology
BS, East Carolina University; MS, PhD, University of North Carolina
Mary E. Wilson (2007-2012)Professor, Human Resources and Management
BA, MA, University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa; PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham
J. Thomas Wright (2009-2010)Professor/Russell &Margaret Thomas Chair, Biology
BS, Columbus College; PhD, Emory University
Chu Chu Wu (2008-2013)Assistant Professor, Early Childhood Education
BA, Fu-Jen Catholic University; MS, Iowa State University; PhD, Syracuse University
Feng Xu (2009-2010)Assistant Professor, Management
BEcon, Sichuan University, China; MS, South Dakota State University; MBA, PhD, The George Washington University
Chin-Wen Yang (2009-2010)Assistant Professor, Special Education
BCom, University of Southern Queensland; Med, University of Missouri-Saint Louis; PhD, Saint Louis University
Aleksandr M. Yemelyanov (2007-2012)Professor, Computer and Information Sciences
MS, Moscow State University; DSc, Supreme Certification Board under the Council of Ministers of the USSR; PhD, Computing Center under the Academy of Science of the USSR

Campus Map

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GRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

The descriptions of the courses offered by each school and department follow the information section and listing of degree programs for each school and department. Numbers following the description of the course indicate the number of weekly class hours, the number of weekly laboratory or practicum hours, and the credit-hour value of the course expressed in semester hours. For example, (3-2-3) following the course description means three class hours, two laboratory or practicum hours, and three semester hours of credit.

A | B | C | E | G | M | P

Accounting

ACCT 6200. Managerial Control. A study of the concepts of analysis and interpretation of financial data as a basis for business decisions. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( ACCT 2102 Minimum Grade: C or ACT 327 Minimum Grade: C ) or ACCT 2102 MBA Prereq 1 

ACCT 6390. Accounting Internship-Graduate. Professional accounting experience with public accounting firm business, or other organization while under the supervision of a partner, manager, or other officer of the sponsoring organization. (3-0-3)

Biology

BIOL 6750. Special Problems in Biology. Individual work providing the student an opportunity to follow a specific program of study under the direction of a qualified instructor of his choice. Must be prearranged with advisor, department chair and instructor. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: BIOL 2108 or BIOL 2108H or BIO 222 

Business Administration

BUSA 6025. Business Internship. Practical experience gained by "employment" in the workplace and in the accomplishment of one or more special projects pertinent to the activities of the sponsoring agency or organization. Graduate students will assume leadership roles in this course, and will receive assignments based on their areas of expertise. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6045. Graduate Course in Free Enterp. This course is designed to inform, instruct, and enlighten students about the free enterprise system. Students should gain, through an APPLIED approach, an appreication of a myriad of business concepts vital in today's business environment including, but not limited to: market research, new product development, advertising and sales promotion, salesmanship, management, and accounting/financial principles. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6046. Graduate Course in Free Enter. A conatinuation of BUSA 6045, the course is designed to advance students' leadership and managerial skills through analysis and completion of projects, preparation of annual areport, and successful completion of Regional and national competition. Graduate Students will assume leadership roles in this course, and will receive assignment based on their areas of experience. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( BUSA 6045 Minimum Grade: B ) 

BUSA 6100. History and Philosophy of Mgmt. A review of the history of the development of the philosophy and practice of managing people in organizations and organized activity. Emphasis is upon independent research and in-depth discussions of results of case studies and projects. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6110. Business Ethics. This course is designed to examine the relationship between ethical theory and business decision making. The goal is an integration of ethics and social responsibility into real-world business situations. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6120. Marketing Management. This is an integrative course designed to demonstrate the complexity and multidimensional nature of marketing decisions. The course will focus on marketing policy nd strategy from a manager's perspective. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MKTG 3800 Minimum Grade: C or MKT 320 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BUSA 5800 Minimum Grade: C or MKT 520 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BUSA 5600 Minimum Grade: C or BUS 512 Minimum Grade: C ) or MGNT 3600 MBA Prereq 1 

BUSA 6130. Production and Operation Mgt. This course focuses on methods for designing and improving productive systems. Focus will be placed on the value added transformation of input to out put and the creation of products and services. Students utilize and develop critical and stragetic thinking skills in order to analyze current concepts and developments in the field of operations management. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( BUSA 3050 Minimum Grade: C or MTH 204 Minimum Grade: C ) and ( MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312 Minimum Grade: C ) or BUSA 3050 MBA Prereq 1 

BUSA 6140. Adv Business Finance. A seminar focusing on selected issues in contemporary corporate finance and the current business environment. Topics will vary but will likely include issues related to international finance, management of working capital, financial distress, and mergers and acquisitions. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( BUSA 3150 Minimum Grade: C or BUS 330 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BUSA 5150 Minimum Grade: C or BUS 530 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( FIN 330 Minimum Grade: C ) or BUSA 3150/MBA Prereq 1 

BUSA 6150. Human Resource Management. This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of human resource management with emphasis on management responsibilities regarding the organization's human resources. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312 Minimum Grade: C or MGNT 3600H Minimum Grade: C ) or MGNT 3600 MBA Prereq 1 

BUSA 6150S. Hum Res Mgmt - Study Abroad. Study-Abroad - This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of human resource management with emphasis on management responsibilities regarding the organization's human resouces. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6160. Managerial Economics. Practical analysis of business fluctuations as a major factor in forecasting business activity on a general level as well as for the individual firm. The importance of forecasting in the business organization is included along with consideration of macro-economic forces which affect forecasts and various methods of analysis for determination of cyclical factors and other methods of preparing and documenting forecasts. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( BUSA 3050 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 2204 Minimum Grade: C or MTH 204 Minimum Grade: C ) or BUSA 3050 MBA Prereq 1 

BUSA 6170. Quantitative MGNT-Graduate. An introduction to quantitative decision making techniques to problems of business. It includes material on Decision Analysis, Linear Programming, Inventory Management and Project Scheduling, Stochastic Models as well as some advanced statistical topics like Regression, ANOVA, Quality Analysis, and Non Parametric Tests. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( BUSA 3050 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 2204 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 204 Minimum Grade: C ) or BUSA 3050 MBA Prereq 1 

BUSA 6180. Internat'l Business Practices. A course designed to focus on five aspects of the cross-border environment: exchange rates and international capital markets, trading patterns and regimes, regulatory content, and political content. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6180S. Int'l Bus Pract - Study Abroad. Study-Abroad - A course designed to focus on five aspects o the cross-border environment: exchange rates and international capital markets, trading patterns and regimes, regulatory content, and political content. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6530. Seminar in Internat'l Issues. Current topics of international concern are covered from a business and societal perspective. Analysis of stakeholder reactions in international issues will be a focus of this course. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6540. Organizational Leadership. Leadership theory is explored as it relates to management in organizations. Students analyze specific aspects of leader ship and organizational behavior as they view current films and use this analysis to connect theory to applicaton. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BUSA 5600 Minimum Grade: C or BUS 512 Minimum Grade: C ) or MGNT 3600 MBA Prereq 1 

BUSA 6550. Entrepreneurship. Students are provided an opportunity to learn how to manage a newly-organized or acquired small business. Major emphasis is placed on design, integration and operation of all aspects of a small business. Extensive use is made of experiential exercise. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BUSA 5600 Minimum Grade: C or BUS 512 Minimum Grade: C ) or MGNT 3600 MBA Prereq 1 

BUSA 6570. Labor Management Relations. Focuses on understanding the process through which employers and unions egotiate, constraints on both groups, and the shared responsibility for administering negotiated contracts. Analysis of problems in the process, and procedures for minimizing these problems will be explored. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6600. Strategic Management. A study of business strategy and strategic planning in relation to company resources, the environment, and changes which may bring opportunities or threats. An opportunity to apply one's skills through strategic cases analysis and through the management of a manufacturing firm in a computer-simulated business situation. Intended to culminate the entering graduate student's background for entry into graduate business study. This course is offered on the graduate level but may not be applied to graduate business degree requirements. Prerequisites: ( MKTG 3800 Minimum Grade: C or MKT 320 Minimum Grade: C ) or ( BUSA 5800 Minimum Grade: C or BUS 520 Minimum Grade: C ) or MKTG 3800 MBA Prereq 1 

BUSA 6615. International Business Exper. A study of how business is conducted in foreign countries and how culture impacts business decisions. Emphasis will be placed on relations between the U.S. and a selected country, with an end-of-semester trip to visit businesses in the country studied. Minimum GPA of 3.5 required. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MGNT 3600 Minimum Grade: C or MGT 312 Minimum Grade: C ) or MGNT 3600 MBA Prereq 1 

Information Technology

CIS 5310. Decision Support Systems. This course concentrates in the use of computer systems to help and assist in the decision making process. It will start with analyzing the process of making a decision and the role of a decision maker. This course examines a set of information systems which support decision makers: individual and group decision support systems, expert systems, and neural networks. It discusses the development, implementation, and application of these systems. To understand how DSS are built, several aeras and tools of modeling and artificial intelligence will be considered. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CSCI 3500, minimum grade: C. Prerequisites: ( CSCI 3500 Minimum Grade: C ) 

CIS 5320. Obj-Oriented Design-Analysis. This course introduces students to the formal process of system development using the Unified Modeling Language (UML). The course emphasizes object-oriented systems analysis and design with primary focus on the analysis phase through logical modeling techniques (use case diagrams, class diagrams, sequence diagrams, etc.). Students are required to submit a project using UML diagrams and available software.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CSCI 1302 Minimum Grade: C ) 

CIS 6410. Client-Server Systems. This course distinguishes between the clients part, server part and the communicaiton part of the client/server systems. It covers design and development of integrated client/server database applications using PL/SQL and Rapid Application Development tools, application performance tuning, security and management of application, and database administration. Students will develop a client/server application on a popular client/server database management system such as MS SQL or Oracle. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: CSCI 4400. Prerequisites: CSCI 4400 

CIS 6420. Data Mining. This course is aimed at preparing students with a comprehensive look at the concepts and techniques needed to discover new knowedge from business data. It includes several methods of data mining, provides in-depth coverage of essential data mining topics including OLAP and data warehousing, data processing, concept description, association rules, classification and prediction, and analysis.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CSCI 4400 Minimum Grade: C ) 

CIS 6720. Distributed Web Applications. This course will survey the tools, techniques, and design principles behind distributed web applications, and will cover many of the design, deployment, and maintenance issues. You'll learn the concepts of the web services architecture, SOAP (Simple Open Access Protocol) and other leading web services standards-WSDL (Web Service Description Language), and UDDI (Universal Discription Discovery and Integration protocol).(3-0-3) . Prerequisites: ( CSCI 1302 ) or ( CSC 220 ) or ( CSCI 4310 ) 

CIS 6800. Human-Comp Interact-Intf Des. This course will discuss interface design between user and computer, user capabilities and limitations, designing systems for people, evaluation and testing of systems, usability engineering, and ergonomics. At the center of the course is the development of a hands-on semester project that will help students to learn about various stages of an effective design process. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CSCI 4300 or CSCI 430. Prerequisites: ( CSCI 4300 ) or ( CSC 430 ) 

CIS 6900. Special Problems in CIS. This course provides students with an opportunity to study and explore current computer information systems topics not covered in any other course. Students will also have the opportunity to design and implement software systems for business environments and to expand on projects from previous classes.

Computer Science

CSCI 5120. Topics in Information Security. Complete examination of the issues and problems in providing security for information processing systems, security goals and vulnerabilities, encryption and decryption, secure general purpose operating systems and applications, network security, Digital Signatures and Public Key Cryptosystems, security protocols, etc. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: CSCI 2920 Minimum grade: C. Prerequisites: ( CSCI 2920 Minimum Grade: C ) 

CSCI 6220. Distributed Operating Systems. This course will cover taxonomy of distributed systems and distributed operating systems. Topics will include mutual exclusion, atomic transaction, deadlock handling, threads, processor allocation, scheduling, distributed file systems, distributed shared memory, and system programming issues in distributed systems.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: CSCI 4200 

CSCI 6230. Internet Architect-Protocols. This course deals with the principles and issues underlying the provision of wide area connectivity through the interconnection of autonomous networks. Detailed discussion of the problems and solution techniques that arise in internetworking. Emphasis will be placed on Internet architecture and protocols. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CSCI 4210 ) 

CSCI 6320. Adv Software Engineering. This course is a follow-up to the software engineering course. Students are introduced to topics such as formal specification techniques and software verification and validation. Model-based and algebraic formal specification methods will be introduced in detail and applied to software development. Students will also be introduced to software quality metrics, software testing strategies, software configuration management and software reliability.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: CSCI 4300 

CSCI 6410. Adv Database Design. This course will discuss emerging advanced database technology to prepare the students with currently practiced database tools in the industry. Students will do comparative study of different database systems. The course will also discuss design, development, and implementation strategies involving databases, database security, and database administration.(3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( CSCI 4400 ) 

CSCI 6821. Adv Computer Graphics. This course is an exposition of the techniques needed to generate and render three-dimensional computer images. It will provide a theoretical understanding of these techniques together with the programming expertise required to implement them. Two-dimensional graphics will be reviewed in detail. Homogeneous (4-coordinate) representation of three-dimensional points and vectors are presented with matrix transformations for orthographic and perspective projection. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CSCI 4820 

CSCI 6831. Topics in Advanced AI. This course provides an in-depth study of one of the major subdisciplines of Artificial Intelligence. Possible topics include natural language processing, game theory, expert systems, neural networks, vision, robotics, speech recognition and synthesis, and knowledge representation. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CSCI 4830 

CSCI 6900. Special Problems in CS. This course provides students with an opportunity to study and explore current computer science and computer information systems topics not covered by any other course. Students will also have an opportunity to design and implement software systems for business environments and to expand on projects from previous classes.(3-0-3)

CSCI 6930. Internship. The Internship gives students an opportunity to apply and extend the theoretical knowledge acquired in the classroom to a practical experience. Students have to submit a formal paper describing and evaluating the internship experience and examining it's implications for future work.(3-0-3)

CSCI 7900. Thesis. With the approval of his/her major professor, a candidate for the M.S. degree may take 6 credit hours of thesis. (6-0-6)

Teacher Certification

EDCF 5700. Internship in P-12. An internship with emphasis on planning, selecting, preparing, and evaluating instructional materials in P-12 teaching fields and developing needs assessment for the classroom teacher to prepare for Georgia Teacher Observation Assessment (GTOI) or system assessment. Cannot be used to satisfy degree requirements. Prerequisites: Application filed with Director of Clinical Experiences one full semester in advance; permission of instructor; at least 15 semester hours of credit at Georgia Southwestern State University. (0-15-6)

EDCF 5800. Internship in P-12. An internship with emphasis placed on curriculum planning, methodology, and evaluating instructional materials in P-12 teaching fields. Cannot be used to satisfy degree requirements. (0-15-6) Prerequisites: ( EDCF 5700 ) 

Early Childhood Education

EDEC 6100. Adv Study of EC Lang Arts. An intensive study of methods, materials and experiences in the language arts as the basis for emotional, social and mental growth by young children, evaluation of materials and procedures for teaching the language skills necessary for success in school. (3-0-3)

EDEC 6120. Children's Literature for EC. An advanced study of various genre of books for children. Emphasis is placed on identifying the various roles quality literature plays in the educational programs for children. Pedagogical implications are incorporated. (3-0-3)

EDEC 6400. Adv Study of EC Science. A course which focuses on teaching strategies that prmote equity in Science and Technology. It incorporates innovative instructional strategies, science content, educational technology and classroom management. The participants apply their understandings by adapting, implementing and evalua- ting equitable teaching strategies in their classrooms. (3-0-3)

EDEC 6500. Adv Study EC Social Studies. A study of recent developments in Early Childhood Social Studies with emphasis on curent theory and experimentation in curriculum and teaching practices. (3-0-3)

EDEC 6600. Teaching of EC Mathematics I. Activity oriented course that models student centered, dis- covery approaches to teaching the basic mathematics skills that are based on the NCTM Standards. Major focus will be placed on creating and maintaining a classroom management style that promotes a "safe" classroom environment and fosters the development of personal responsibility. Alter- natives will be offered for teaching, assessing and grading student growth in mathematical thinking and mathematical power. (3-0-3)

EDEC 6610. Teaching of EC Mathematics II. A continuation of EDEC 6600, with learning experiences fo- cused on topics in number patterns, geometry, and general problem solving. Emphasis will be placed on teaching practi- ces that promote development of life-long learning skills and on alternative assessment/grading practices. (3-0-3)

EDEC 6700. The Arts in Early Childhood. This course investigates elements of art and principles of design that support children's artistic development. Various two- and three- dimensional art processes are explored in relation to how they can be used to support children's affective and academic development across curricular areas. (3-0-3)

EDEC 7020. Special Problems in EC Edu. A study of problems related to specific curriculum and cer- tification areas in the Early Childhood program. Emphasis is placed upon special projects and independent study. May be repeated for credit in a different curriculum area. (3-0-3)

EDEC 7050. EC Theoret Frameworks-Analysis. This course provides a comprehensive and in-depth study of theories that provide a foundation for understanding young children in grades P-5. The impact of growth and development for planning appropriate and equitable educational programs is studied. The course also explores how various theories underlie teaching decisions and practices in early childhood programs. (3-0-3)

EDEC 7250. EC Instructional Strategies. This course is designed to enhance candidate's knowledge of content, its organization, and its relationships. Candidates are provided strategies and techniques for conveying subject(s) to learners in ways that recognize individual differences using multiple methods to enhance learning. Equitable treatment of learners in an active learning environment is stressed. (3-0-3)

EDEC 7420. EC Directed Study-Field Projec. A research-oriented study or project selected according to interests or needs of students. (1-0-3)

EDEC 7550. Issues and Trends in EC. The course examines issues, trends, and problems in early childhood education. Information sources for research, including print and media resources, will be included. Content will include conceptualizing, completing, and presenting an extensive literature review for a research project to enhance professional writing and presentation skills. (3-0-3)

EDEC 7750. Assessment in EC Ed. The course provides an in-depth study of appropriate strategies for assessing the learning of young children. Assessment instruments and procedures for examining development in the cognitive, physical, and social domains are included. The course will also explore issues related to standardized testing in relation to the importance of testing in early childhood education. (3-0-3)

EDEC 7800. Role of Collaboration in EC. This course is designed to acquaint and expand the knowledge of teachers in early childhood education with a variety of innovative programs in existence involving parents as partners in education. The history of parental involvement, research, leadership development, benefits to children, parents, school, and community, as well as strategies for promoting parent involvement, are emphasized. (3-0-3)

EDEC 7900. Curriculum Strategies. The course provides a study of Early Childhood Education with emphasis on curriculum decision-making, and curriculum content. Procedures for planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum appropriate for the young learner is presented. (3-0-3)

EDEC 7960. M.Ed. Practicum I in EC. This course is designed to allow candidates in the field to integrate theory and practice by enabling them to test, within the school environment, appropriate teaching-learning programs and practices. (0-2-3)

EDEC 7970. M.Ed. Practicum II in EC. This course is designed to allow candidates in the field to integrate theory and practice by enabling them to test, within the school environment, appropriate testing-learning programs and practices. Candidates may elect to extend previous practicum experiences with approval from the instructor. (0-2-3)

EDEC 7980. M.Ed. Seminar in EC. This course is designed to enhance candidate's experiences in practicum. Results from practicum experiences will be reported, and a variety of topics selected for study will be considered. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8000. Adv Grad Seminar EC. Public policy, issues, and concerns as well as futuristic issues in Early Childhood Education will be presented for consideration in the open forum. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8080. EC Edu in Modern Society. A study of contemporary Early Childhood Education with em- phasis upon political and sociological elements, program development, and leaders in the field. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8100. Measurement-Evaluation in EC. Investigation and practical application of measurement techniques and instruments used in the evaluation of the growth of young children. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8120. Qualitative Research. A course designed to expand students' understanding of educational research methodology. The course will explore curently accepted qualitative research methods and appropri- ate interpretations. Students will design a qualitative research proposal for implementation in their classroom. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8380. Language Development-Reading. A study of productive and receptive language development and processes with implications for planning and implementing appropriate language curriculum for children in grades P-5. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8400. Strat for Teaching E C Science. Planning, implementation, and evaluation of early grades science programs will be emphasized. The class will be con- ducted in a seminar format with class activities built on the science programs of the students' schools. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8480. Admn-Supv of EC Program. A course designed to support the development of teacher leaders in Early Childhood Education. Emphasis is placed on developing leadership skills in the areas of mentoring and supervising pre-service and new teachers, participating in site-based management, and providing leadership in areas of education accountability in Early Childhood Education. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8500. Strat for Teaching EC Soc Stud. A course designed to lead advanced students in the examination of instructional strategies, content material, and evaluation techniques applicable to Early Childhood social studies. Attention will focus on both cognitive and affective learning. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8600. Adv Strat for EC Mathematics. Advanced study of issues and techniques that are critical to effective Mathematics teaching and learning. Focused atten- tion on diagnostic, instructional, and assessment techniques that involve self monitoring and self assessment. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8770. Trends-Issues in EC Edu Tech. An examination of Early Childhood Education as a dynamic field influencing and influenced by various political, social, and educational trends and issues. Emphasis is placed on examining contemporary issues and trends in relation to current education literature. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8780. Practicum in EC Education. A course designed to allow the student in the field to inte- grate theory and practice by enabling the student to test within the school environment appropriate teaching-learning programs. (0-6-3)

EDEC 8800. Readings in E C Education. A course in selected readings on Early Childhood Education. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8860. EdS Practicum I in EC. This course provides candidates with school-based teacher leadership experiences in grades P-5. The practicum provides an opportunity for candidates to integrate theory and practice by enabling them to test knowledge and skills in the areas of curriculum, instruction, leadership, staff development, and school and community relations. Candidates will make decisions that test their judgments and use the knowledge to improve student learning. (0-2-3)

EDEC 8870. EdS Practicum II in EC. This course provides candidates with school-based teacher leadership experiences in grades P-5. The practicum provides an opportunity for candidates to integrate theory and practice by enabling them to test knowledge and skills in the areas of curriculum, instruction, leadership, staff development, and school and community relations. Candidates will make decision that test their judgments and use the knowledge to improve student learning. (0-2-3)

EDEC 8880. EdS Seminar in EC. This course is designed to enhance candidate's experiences in practicum. Results from practicum experiences will be reported, and a variety of topics selected for study will be considered. (3-0-3)

General Content Education Trac

EDGC 7050. GC Theoret Frameworks/Analysis. This course provides a comprehensive and in-depth study of theories that provide a foundaion for understanding children in general content classes. The impact of growth and development for planning appropriate and equitable educational programs is studied. The course also explores how various theories underlie teaching decisions and practices in programs for children in general content classes, grades 4-12. (3-0-3)

EDGC 7250. GC Instructional Strategies. This course is designed to enhance candidate's knowledge of content, its organization, and its relationships. Candidates are provided strategies and techniques for conveying subject(s) to learners in ways that recognize individual differences using multiple methods to enhance learning. Equitable treatment of learners in an active learning environment is stressed. (3-0-3)

EDGC 7550. GC Issues and Trends. This course examines issues, trends, and problems in education. Information sources for research, including print and media resources, will be included. Content will include conceptualizing, completing, and presenting an extensive literature review for a research project to enhance professional writing and presentation skills. (3-0-3)

EDGC 7960. M.Ed. Practicum I in GC. This course is designed to allow candidates in the field to integrate theory and practice by enabling them to test, within the school environment, appropriate teaching-learning programs and practices. (0-2-3)

EDGC 7970. M.Ed. Practicum II in GC. This course is designed to allow candidates in the field to integrate theory and practice by enabling them to test, within the school environment, appropriate teaching-learning programs and practices. Candidates may elect to extend previously practicum experiences with approval from the instructor. (0-2-3)

EDGC 7980. M.Ed. Seminar in GC. This course is designed to enhance candidate's experiences in practicum. Results from practicum experiences will be reported, and a variety of topics selected for study will be considered. (3-0-3)

EDGC 8860. EdS Practicum I in GC. This course provides candidates with school-based teacher leadership experiences in content-based classrooms. The practicum provides an opportunity for candidates to integrate theory and practice by enabling them to test knowledge and skills in the areas of curriculum, instruction, leadership, staff development, and school and community relations. Candidates will make decisions that test their judgments and use the knowledge to improve student learning. (0-2-3)

EDGC 8870. EdS Practicum II in GC. This course provides candidates with school-based teacher leadership experiences in content-based classrooms. The practicum provides an opportunity for candidates to integrate theory and practice by enabling them to test knowledge and skills in the areas of curriculum, instruction, leadership, staff development, and school and community relations. Candidates will make decisions that test their judgments and use the knowledge to improve student learning. (0-2-3)

EDGC 8880. EdS Seminar in General Content. This course is designed to enhance candidate's experiences in practicum. Results from practicum experiences will be reported, and a variety of topics selected for study will be considered. (3-0-3)

Middle Grades Education

EDMG 6100. Adv Study of MG Lang Arts. An in-depth study of recent developments in teaching oral and written composition, spelling, handwriting, grammar and usage in the middle school. (3-0-3)

EDMG 6120. Children's Lit for the M G. An advanced study of the works of fine authors and illu- strators, new and old, as well as the broad spectrum of contemporary and traditional young adult literature. A prac- tical and explicit overview of ways in which teachers (4-8) can evaluate and select books and involve students in lit- erature, with specific suggestions for goals and techniques. Exploration of adolescent preferences and aesthetic re- sponses to visual aspects of their books. Emphasis is on the importance of extending literature throughout the school curriculum. (3-0-3)

EDMG 6400. Adv Study of MG Science. A course which focuses on teaching strategies that promote equity in science and technology. It incorporates innovative instructional strategies, science content, educational technology and classroom management. The participants apply their understandings by adapting, implementing and evalua- ting equitable teaching strategies in their classrooms. (3-0-3)

EDMG 6450. Science Workshop for MG Teache. A workshop for updating the knowledge and skills of Middle Grades science teachers. Included are uses of technology in science instruction encompassing computers, software, and other media; laboratory activities; and the examination of commercial science programs. (3-0-3)

EDMG 6500. Adv Study of MG Soc Studies. A study of recent developments in Middle Grades social stu- dies with emphasis on current theory and experimentation in curriculum and teaching practices. (3-0-3)

EDMG 6600. Teaching of M G Mathematics I. Activity oriented course that models student centered, dis- covery approaches to teaching topics in problem solving, set theory, number theory, probability, and introductory geometry based on the NCTM Principles and Standards. "Best teaching practices" for mathematics instruction at the middle school level will be researched and analyzed. Also, alternatives will be offered for teaching and assessing student growth in mathematical thinking and mathematical power. (2-2-3)

EDMG 6610. Teaching of M G Mathematics II. A continuation of EDMG 6600, with learning experiences fo- cused on topics in statistics, measurement, and geometry. Emphasis will be placed on research into best practices that promote the development of life-long learning skills and on alternative assessment/grading practices for mathematics instruction in the middle grades. (2-2-3)

EDMG 6650. Investigations of Math Art. A course designed to provide teachers with classroom tested ideas that will allow students to experience aesthetics in mathematics. By investigating patterns and geometric trans- formations students will create vivid and interesting pos- ters and models to decorate any classroom grades 4-8, and the same time learn how mathematical structures themselves are elegant and beautiful. (3-0-3)

EDMG 6700. The Arts in Middle Grades. An advanced study of the role of the expressive arts in the development of young children with recommended practices in qualitative curriculum planning, together with laboratory projects that identify problems in Middle Grades arts, in- cluding philosophical, motivational and evaluative aspects. (3-0-3)

EDMG 7020. Special Problems in M G. An investigation into problems and issues related to middle school teaching and middle grades curricula. Special readings and field experiences required. (3-0-3)

EDMG 7420. MG Directed Study-Field Projec. A research-oriented study or project selected according to interests or needs of student. (1-0-3)

EDMG 7700. M G Growth-Development. A study of the human growth and development focusing on developmental characteristics and nature and needs of young adolescents. Field experience required. (3-0-3)

EDMG 7800. Parent Family School Collabora. A course designed to acquaint and expand the knowledge of teachers in the field of education with a variety of inno- vative programs in existence involving parents as partners in education. The history of parental involvement, the bene- fits to children, parents, school, and the community as well as research and leadership training in parental involvement are emphasized. Specific programs in early childhood, middle grades and secondary fields will be examined. (3-0-3)

EDMG 7900. M G Curr Planning-Trends. A study of the content and methodology of Middle Grades school curriculum. Emphasis is placed on trends in modern curriculum development focusing upon such issues as the nature of the pupil, the nature of learning, function and aims of the middle school, influence of society, and evalu- ation and revision of the middle school curriculum. (3-0-3)

EDMG 8020. Org Adm-Supervision of MG Ed. Problems of organization, administration and supervision of the middle schools with emphasis on proper staff utiliza- tion, instruction and evaluation procedures and approaches to the problem of influencing staff members in relation to efficiency. (3-0-3)

EDMG 8300. The Adolescent Learner. An advanced growth and development course covering the his- torical, biological, sociological and moral realities of today's teenagers. Emphasis will be placed on how to deal more effectively with adolescents in the school, home and community. (3-0-3)

EDMG 8380. Lang Development-Reading. A course designed to examine the development and operation of an effective language arts program in the Middle Grades. Attention will be given to the four language arts areas of speaking, listening, reading and writing. (3-0-3)

EDMG 8400. Strategies for Teach Science. A course which focuses on thematic and science, technology and society (STS) approaches to the curriculum. The partici- pants take part in, review, and evaluate units from innova- tive curriculum projects and apply their understandings by adapting, implementing and evaluating a unit in their class- room. (3-0-3)

EDMG 8500. Strat for Teaching Soc Studies. A course designed to lead advanced students in the examination of instructional strategies, content material, and evaluation techniques applicable to Middle Grades social studies. Attention will focus on both cognitive and affective learning. (3-0-3)

EDMG 8600. Adv Strat for Teaching MG Math. Advanced study of issues and techniques that are critical to effective mathmatics teaching and learning. Focused attention on diagnostic, instructional and assessment techniques that involve self monitoring and self assessment. Students will particpate in a mathematics institute as they work with children in a closely supervised teaching situa- tion in order that they might practice and improve their own teaching. (3-0-3)

Reading Education

EDRG 6200. The Teaching of Reading. An advanced study of instructional techniques and materials for the teaching of reading from preschool through grade twelve. Emphasis is given to the extension of reading com- petencies, word recognition and comprehension strategies required for success in content areas, and integrated lit- erature-based reading programs, as well as the instructional implications of the psycholinguistic theory. (3-0-3)

EDRG 6210. Diag-Corr of Reading Difficu. Advance study designed for the teaching of reading from preschool through grade twelve in identification, diagnosis and remediation of reading difficulties. Emphasis is on diagnostic-prescriptive reading instruction through mastery of varied diagnostic instruments, instructional procedures, and materials appropriate for use with readers requiring remediation. (3-0-3)

EDRG 6230. Trends-Prac in Teach Reading. A critical analysis of new programs, materials and methods, and developments in reading instruction. Emphasis is given to innovative reading programs as well as to current trends and issues in the teaching of reading. (3-0-3)

EDRG 6240. Spec Prob in Reading Education. A seminar for reading majors only which provides students with an opportunity to study and explore reading topics from selections in the education and psychology libraries which are of individual interest and which strengthen a particular area in the student's program or background. (3-0-3)

EDRG 6250. Org-Sup of the Reading Prog. An analysis of the organization of reading programs P-12, and an investigation of varied supervision techniques. Focus is on the design, management and evaluation of reading pro- grams at the classroom, school and district levels. Par- ticular attention is given to the techniques of assessing needs, settling goals and objectives; determining program resource requirements; coordinating, organizing and monitor- ing program development and implementation activities; and designing program evaluation strategies. For Reading majors only. (3-0-3)

EDRG 6280. Tch of Reading in Content Fiel. Designed to offer all content area teachers detailed and practical explanations of reading and study strategies needed by students to acquire and use new information. Instruction is built on research-based techniques for teach- ing these strategies in a broad range of disciplines. Em- phasis is on helping students become more efficient, effective readers of content materials and facilitating their learning of the subject matter content. Designed for Middle Grades and secondary teachers and for reading majors. (3-0-3)

EDRG 7420. RDG Dir Stu - Field Proj. A research-oriented study or project selected according to interests or needs of student. (1-0-3)

Secondary Education

EDSC 7020. Special Problems Secondary Edu. A study of problems related to specific curriculum areas in the secondary program. Emphasis is placed upon special pro- jects and independent study. (3-0-3)

EDSC 7420. SEC Directed - Field Proj. A research-oriented study or project selected according to interests or needs of student. (1-0-3)

Special Education

EDSP 6000. Special Problems in Special Ed. A study of problems related to curriculum and instruction in Special Education. Recent trends in the education of exceptional individuals. Emphasis is placed upon special projects and independent study. May be repeated for credit. (1-0-1 or 2-0-2 or 3-0-3)

EDSP 6110. Charact of Ind with Intell Dis. Study of the nature and characteristics of individuals with intellectual disabilities, classification, etiology and incidence, psycholocial and biological aspects, sociological aspects, learning and education. Field experience required. (3-0-3)

EDSP 6120. Curr-Meth Intellec Disabilit. Study of curriculum construction, classroom organization and collaboration with others and to ancillary and community services. Field experience required. (3-3-3)

EDSP 6150. Practicum Intellect Disabiliti. Supervised teaching and participation in an approved in- structional setting with individuals with intellectual disabilities. Seminar is required. May be repeated for credit. (0-15-3)

EDSP 6230. Curr-Prog Dev for Gifted Edu. An in-depth study of curriculum construction and program development for gifted and talented students P-12. Field experience required. (3-1-3)

EDSP 6250. Practic in Gifted Edu I II III. Supervised teaching and participation in an approved in- structional setting with gifted students. Seminar required. May be repeated for credit. Field experience required. (0-15-3)

EDSP 6310. Charac of Ind with Learn Dis. Study of the nature of learning disabilities with emphasis on definitions, causes, characteristics and needs of in- dividuals with learning disabilities. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 6320. Mat-Meth Learning Disabiliti. Study of curriculum construction, resources, diagnosis, re- mediation practices and working with families of individuals with learning disabilities. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 6330. Ind of Instr Diag Pres Teachin. Analysis of the remediation process with emphasis on the diagnostic prescriptive approach as used with individuals with difficulty in learning. Includes the use of assessment instruments and individualized Education Plans. (3-0-3)

EDSP 6350. Practicum in Learning Disabili. Supervised teaching and participation in an approved in- structional setting with learning disabled individuals. May be repeated for credit. (0-15-3)

EDSP 6410. Charac of Ind with Beh Disord. An in-depth study of the definition, identification and characteristics of students with emotional or behavioral disorders as well as philosophical bases for treatment. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 6420. Mat-Meth for Teach Beh Dis. Planning and implementing educational programs for indivi- duals with behavior disorders and emotional disturbances. Emphasizes intervention techniques and behavior management. Methods, materials and curriculum for regular education and self-contained settings. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 6450. Practicum in Beh-Emo Dis. Supervised teaching and participation in an approved in- structional setting with behavior disordered-emotionally disturbed individuals. Seminar required. May be repeated for credit. (0-15-3)

EDSP 6550. Practicum in Mild Disabilities. Supervised teaching and participation in an approved in- structional setting with individuals having mild disabili- ties. Seminar required. May be repeated for credit. (0-15-3)

EDSP 7000. Special Topics in Special Ed. Special Topics in Special Education on selected issues, pro- blems and literature. May be repeated for credit. (1-0-1 or 2-0-2 or 3-0-3)

EDSP 7050. SPED Theoret Frmworks/Analysis. This course provides a comprehensive and in-depth study of theories that provide a foundation for understanding children with special needs. The impact of growth and development for planning appropriate and equitable educational programs is studied. The course also explores how various theories underlie teaching decisions and practices in special education programs.

EDSP 7080. Leg Eth-Prof Aspects of SpEd. A study of litigation, legislation, ethical and moral issues and the codes of professional conduct in the field of special education. (3-0-3)

EDSP 7250. SPED Instructional Strategies. This course is designed to enhance candidate's knowledge of content, its organization, and its relationships. Candidates are provided strategies and techniques for conveying subject(s) to learners in ways that recognize invididual differences using multiple methods to enhance learning. Equitable treatment of learners in an active learning environment is stressed. (3-0-3)

EDSP 7420. Sp Ed Dir St - Field Proj. A research-oriented study or project selected according to interests or needs of student. (1-0-3)

EDSP 7510. Psychoedu Evaluation-Assessm. Study of assessment techniques and procedures for use with exceptional individuals. Experience in administration and reporting formal and informal diagnostic and prescriptive techniques. (3-0-3)

EDSP 7550. SPED Issues and Trends. This course examines issues, trends, and problems in education. Information sources for research, including print and media resources, will be included. Content will include conceptualizing, completing, and presenting an extensive literature review for a research project to enhance professional writing and presentation skills. (3-0-3)

EDSP 7960. M.Ed. Practicum I in SPED. This course is designed to allow candidates in the field to integrate theory and practice by enabling them to test, within the school environment, appropriate teaching-learning programs and practices. (0-30-3)

EDSP 7970. M.Ed. Practicum II in SPED. This course is designed to allow candidates in the field to integrate theory and practice by enabling them to test, within the school environment, appropriate teaching-learning programs and practices. Candidates may elect to extend previous practicum experiences with approval from the instructor. (0-30-3)

EDSP 7980. M.Ed. Seminar in Special Ed. This course is designed to enhance candidate's experiences in practicum. Results from practicum experiences will be reported, and a variety of topics selected for study will be considered. (3-0-3)

EDSP 7990. Sem Readings-Research Sp Edu. Current research and topics in Special Education. May be repeated for credit. (3-0-3)

EDSP 8860. EdS Practicum I in Special Ed. This course provides candidates with school-based teacher leadership experiences in special education. The practicum provides an opportunity for candidates to integrate theory and practice by enabling them to test knowledge and skills in the areas of curriculum, instruction, leadership, staff development, and school and community relations. Candidates will make decisions that test their judgments and use the knowledge to improve student learning. (0-2-3)

EDSP 8870. Eds Practicum II in Special Ed. This course provides candidates with school-based teacher leadership experiences in special education. The practicum provides an opportunity for candidates to integrate theory and practice by enabling them to test knowledge and skills in the areas of curriculum, instruction, leadership, staff development, and school and community relations. Candidates will make decisions that test their judgments and use the knowledge to improve student learning. (0-2-3)

EDSP 8880. EdS Seminar in Sp Ed. This course is designed to enhance candidate's experiences in practicum. Results from practicum experiences will be reported, and a variety of topics selected for study will be considered. (3-0-3)

Education - General

EDUC 7010. Foundations of Public Educatio. A study of the historical philosophical, socio-cultural, legal, political, economic, and technological foundations of American Education. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7020. Special Problems in Education. A study of problems related to specific curriculum and cer- tification areas. Emphasis is placed upon special projects and independent study. May be repeated for credit in a different curriculum area. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7040. The Teacher and The Law. A study of the legal ramifications of decisions in the school. Case studies and case law will be analyzed. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7060. Third World Ed-Social St Semin. This is a seminar course intended to introduce graduate students in education and allied fields to the origin and development of the educational systems in the "Third World". Students will study the geographical, cultural, and political legacy of five hundred years of European imperialism and its impact on Third World countries. Lastly the course will focus on the nature of the educational system in selected Third World countries and conduct a comparison of those systems with the educational system in the United States. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7070. Comp App for Curr-Classroom. To provide teachers with an understanding of the capabil- ities, uses and limitations of computers, related technol- ogy and software as instructional, management and personal tools. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7080. Intro to Stat in Health-PE. A course designed to introduce basic statistical concepts and their application to Health and Physical Education research problems. Topics include issues related to descriptive and inferential statistics. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7100. Computer Based Instruct Media. A course focused on presentation and multimedia authoring programs for personal computers. The intent is to give the teachers the ability to create and integrate computer presentations in their daily instruction. A prior knowledge of personal computers is necessary. (3-0-3).

EDUC 7110. Edu Computing-Lang Develop. A course designed to provide inservce teachers with an un- derstanding of major theories of language development and the use of computers and computer software in the develop- ment of language and in the development of communication skills. Emphasis is given to written communication, to communication through Hypermedia software and to Internet communication. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7150. Assess-Man of Classroom Prob. A study of appropriate techniques of classroom management and discipline relating to student behavior, learning and motivation. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7300. Learning Dynamics. This course focuses on learning variations that exist in classrooms and how teachers address student diversity to achieve expected outcomes. Emphasis is placed on learning dynamics that include, among others, differentiation, gender, culture, and socioeconomic status. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7400. Methods of Edu Research. This course provides a study of methods and techniques used in the critical analysis of educational concepts. Candidates learn to think systematically about practice and to question learning experiences. An emphasis is placed on how research can be used to improve classroom practice and student learning.

EDUC 7420. EDUC Directed Study-Field Proj. A research-oriented study or project selected according to interests or needs of student. (1-0-3)

EDUC 7500. Assessment and Learning. The course provides an in-depth study of appropriate strategies for assessing student learning and development in the cognitive, physical, and social domains. In addition, candidates learn how to use assessment results to adjust practices to fit the needs of learners as individuals and members of learning communities. The role of assessment in student-based decision making as well as guidelines for the construction, selection, and interpretation of assessment results is included. Issues and trends related to assessment and accountability are emphasized especially in relation to standardized testing. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7510. Edu Measurement-Evaluation. Study of formal and informal tests and measurements and their role in student-based decisions regarding eligibility for programs, classification, and instructional delivery. Includes test construction, selection, interpretation, and criteria for administration. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7600. Technology and Learning. The course provides instruction in planning, selecting, producing, utilizing, and evaluating non-print materials. Emphasis is placed on how to use technology to enhance instruction and to assure diverse instructional strategies are used to teach for understanding. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7700. Growth and Development. A study of human growth and development from conception through aging with special readings. Field experience required. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7800. Collaboration & Professionalis. This course emphasizes the need for teachers to collaborate with others, both professional colleagues and parents or guardians, to improve student learning. Research-supported benefits to children, parents, school, and community are emphasized. Additional content includes strategies for building partnerships to enhance student learning and for developing professionalism and working collaboratively to solve educational problems within the school context. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7900. Curriculum Foundations/Applica. This course provides a study of education curriculum with emphasis on curriculum decision-making and curriculum content. The history, structure, and real-world applications of subjects taught are included. Procedures for planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum appropriate for learners are presented.

EDUC 8010. Philosophy of Education. An in-depth investigation of the alternatives of philoso- phical approaches to education and the relevance to educa- tion decision making. (3-0-3)

EDUC 8110. Adv Research Methods. A study of advanced research methodology and applied re- research. Problem solving, measurement, experimental design consideration and report presentation. (3-0-3)

EDUC 8120. Qualitative Research. This course is designed to enhance candidate's knowledge of non-traditional qualitative research practices. Candidates will explore a variety of qualitative strategies and methods appropriate for use in classrooms and other educational settings. Additional emphasis is on the interpretation of results and how those can be used to improve practices. (3-0-3)

EDUC 8220. Field-Based Edu Research. This course provides candidates an in-depth study of action research. Candidates will explore the process involved in conducting field-based research and will give special attention to determining uses for results. The use of research results in improving practice and increasing student achievement will be emphasized. (3-0-3)

EDUC 8320. Leading Teachers and Change. This course is designed to provide candidates with knowledge and skills that support their supervision and mentoring of pre-service and novice teachers, participation in site-based management, and inclusion in other teacher-leader situations. Candidates will gain insights in how to assist others in adjusting their practices, using knowledge to promote learning, working collaboratively in learning communities to support pupil learning, and accessing community resources to encourage increased achievement. (3-0-3)

EDUC 8420. Supv Instruct to Enhance Lrng. This course is designed for candidates to develop skills for enhancing supervision of others for the purpose of managing and monitoring pupil learning. Candidates will develop knowledge of strategies and techniques that promote articulating goals for pupils, learning in group settings, enhancing the engagement of pupils during the learning experiences, using a variety of methods to promote learning, and assessing pupil progress to support further learning. (3-0-3)

EDUC 8520. Promoting Learning-Diverse Cli. This course is designed to address the needs of pupils and learning in a diverse society. Topics of the course include applying knowledge of the development and learning needs of pupils, adjusting practices to meet the needs of learners, and promoting equitable treatment of pupils. Candidates will develop skills that will allow them to provide assistance to other school personel to enhance student learning. (3-0-3)

EDUC 8620. Curric/Assessment to Link Lrng. This couse is designed to provide candidates knowledge of how content is organized and linked to learning. In addition, candidates will develop knowledge of how to generate multiple paths to knowledge and how to convey knowledge and skills to pupils. Emphasis will be placed on how that knowledge can be used in the teacher-leader role to support pupil learning. (3-0-3)

EDUC 8720. Legal Aspects in Education. This course includes content related to the legal ramifications of decisions in the schools. Among the topics considered are decisions relating to the education of all students including those with special needs, various regulations concerning accountability and student learning, and school effectiveness. (3-0-3)

English

ENGL 5000. Seminar in Lit Criticism-Bib. This course examines the principal schools of contemporary literary theory and their practical application to literature and to the classroom. In addition, the student will be given the opportunity to learn and practice advanced methods of literary research. (Must be taken with GSW faculty either on campus or on-line). (3-0-3)

ENGL 5010. Intro to Literacy Studies. This course provides first-year graduate students with an overview of significant historical and rhetorical texts which have informed educational standards of literacy and subsquent educational policies and practices since the mid-19th century. (3-0-3)

ENGL 5215. Seminar in Adv Composition. Emphasizes the various methods of discourse as a basis for individual writing and for the teaching of writing. The course also includes a study of research in the teaching of writing. Recommended for graduate students who are interested in writing and teaching writing. (3-0-3)

ENGL 5225. Seminar Intro Studies in Comp. A survey of the history and theories of rhetric, an introduction to research in composition, and a study of approaches to composition with emphasis on writing as process. (3-0-3)

ENGL 6020. Seminar in History of Eng Lang. This seminar is an intensive study of the history of English from its origin as the purely oral language of the Proto-Indo-Europeans to its current status as the lingua franca of much of the so-called first world. (3-0-3)

ENGL 6170. Semi Adv Studies Br Lit Sp Top. An in-depth, graduate seminar on a major author, or authors, time period, or theme in British literary studies. (3-0-3)

ENGL 6230. Semi Adv Studies Am Lit Sp Top. An in-depth, graduate seminar on a major author, or authors, time period, or theme in American literary studies. (3-0-3)

ENGL 6430. Visual Interpretation of Lit. Students will analyze ways that literature has been reinterpreted to visual media. Visual translations may include but are not limited to: film, hypertext, graphic novels, art work, illustrations, and edition covers. (3-0-3)

ENGL 6950. Seminar Sp Problems Teach Eng. A course to study issues in the teaching of composition K- 12 with specific emphasis on developing a successful model for staff development. (3-0-3)

Geology

GEOL 5111. Special Problems Earth Science. A graduate-level course to provide the graduate student with an opportunity to follow a specific program of study in the earth sciences under the direction of an instructor of the student's choice. (3-0-3)

GEOL 6121. Earth Science for Teachers. A physical geology course designed for middle and secondary science teachers. An integrated lab and lecture format will provide a better understanding of geologic processes and proficiency in distinguishing and classifying common earth materials. The course will also allow the participants to develop new classroom techniques and assemble useful resource materials. (3-0-3)

Mathematics

MATH 5000. Algebra for Middle Grades. This is the first course in the Middle Grades Mathematics Initiative. Students will become proficient in algebra content prescribed by GPS guidelines. Appropriate technology and manipulatives will be incorporated in the course. (3-0-3)

MATH 5001. Geometry for Middle Grades. This is the second course in the Middle Grades Mathematics Initiative. Students will become proficient in geometry content prescribed by GPS guidelines. Appropriate technology and manipulatives will be incorporated in the course. (3-0-3)

MATH 5002. Number Theory for Mid Grades. This course teaches students concepts in Number Theory and discrete probability appropriate for middle grades classroom with emphasis on problem solving, active learning, and appropriate technology, including calculators, electronic resources, and manipulatives. (3-0-3)

MATH 5003. Statistics for Middle Grades. Introduces teachers to concepts, manipulatives, and technology appropriate for teaching probability and statistics in the middle grades classroom. Emphasizes the use of real world data. (3-0-3)

MATH 6619. Computational Geometry. This course is designed to give graduate students a working knowledge of algorithms for solving geometric problems on a computer. Topics include polygonal triangulation and partitioning, convex hulls, Voronoi diagrams & arrangements, search and intersection algorithms, motion planning, robustness, and randomized algorithms. (3-0-3)

MATH 6640. Partial Differential Equations. This course introduces graduate students to those elements of partial differential equations that play a central role in science, geometry, analysis and computational modeling. (3-0-3)

MATH 6675. Spec Probs in Mathematics. Individual work providing students with the opportunity to follow a specific program of study under the direction of a qualified instructor. (3-0-3)

MATH 7710. Foundations of Algebra. The course offers graduate students a comprehensive overview of algebraic theories and structures including number theory, theory of equations and number fields, as they relate to the teaching of secondary mathematics. (3-0-3)

MATH 7711. Foundations of Statistics. This course is designed to give graduate students a rigorous overview of probablility & statistics. (3-0-3) .

MATH 7712. Foundations of Geometry. A study of Euclidean axiomatic geometry, betweenness, congruence, parallelism, axiomatic systems, & non-Euclidean geometries. (3-0-3)

MATH 7713. Foundations of Analysis. This course is designed to give graduate students a rigourous overview of the subject, as a prerequisite to teaching the subject. (3-0-3)

MATH 7715. Algebraic Geometry I. This course introduces students to modern computational algebraic geometry using algorithms of Buchberger and Hironaka. Topics include affine varieties, Groebner bases, elimination theory, nullstellensatz, applications to robotics and automatic geometric theorem proving. (3-0-3)

MATH 7790. History and Philosophy of Math. Graduate-level survey with emphasis on topical and thematic research, and their use in teaching mathematics. Permission of instructor and graduate standing required. Offered every fall semester. (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ( MATH 2221 or MTH 210 ) 

Health & Physical Education

PHEG 6000. Problems-Trends in Hea-PE. A study of the current pertinent problems and trends an instructor may expect to encounter when teaching health . (3-0-3)

PHEG 6010. Physiology of Exercise. Lectures and readings in current literature to provide reasonable depth in selected areas of physiology as applied to activity and health. (3-1-3)

PHEG 6020. Preventive Care Ath and Injury. Analysis of common athletic injuries, conditioning, and safety practices. (3-0-3)

PHEG 6030. Foundations of Health-PE. A study of the history, philosophy, concepts, and scientific foundations of health and physical education. (3-0-3)

PHEG 6050. Elementary Physical Education. A study of current treands and developments in activity programs for elementary school physical education. (3-2-3)

PHEG 7010. Org-Adm of Health-PE. Basic principles and procedures for the effective organization, administration, and supervision of health and physical education programs. (3-0-3)

PHEG 7020. Meas-Eval, of Health-PE. The selection, application, and evaluation of certain existing tests and measures appropriate in health and physical education. (3-0-3)

PHEG 7030. School Health Program. Principles, procedures, materials, and methods of school health education. (3-0-3)

PHEG 7040. Current Const Health-PE. Deals with the principles, problems, and procedures in the development of the physical education and health education curriculum in public schools. (3-0-3)

PHEG 7050. Adap-Corr PE. Emphasis upon the acquisition of specific information about the causes, nature, and psychological implications of the various handicapping disabilities, and to translate medical findings in terms of needed physical activities. (3-0-3)

PHEG 7060. Motor Learning. Presents research and theory of learning, performance, and related factors as applied to gross motor skills. Intended for teachers, coaches, and those concerned with human performance in motor activity. (3-0-3)

PHEG 7070. Readings in Health. Deals with current research in the field of health designed to help guide and inform the nonprofessional health consumer. (3-0-3)