Bulletin 2003-2004

GEORGIA SOUTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY

A State University
of the University System of Georgia
Established 1906

Georgia Southwestern State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action educational institution and as such does not discriminate in any matter concerning students, employees, or services to its community on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, veteran status, handicap, age, or national origin. The University is in compliance with all known federal, state, and local regulations regarding nondiscrimination.

800 Wheatley Street
AMERICUS, GEORGIA 31709-4379

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

The statements set forth in this catalog are for informational purposes only and should not be construed as the basis of a contract between a student and this institution. While every effort will be made to ensure accuracy of the material stated herein, Georgia Southwestern State University reserves the right to change any provision listed in this catalog, including but not limited to academic requirements for graduation, without actual notice to individual students. Every effort will be made to keep students advised of such changes. Each student is assigned a faculty advisor who will assist the student in interpreting academic regulations and in planning a program of study chosen by the student. However, final responsibility of selecting and scheduling courses and satisfactorily completing curriculum requirements for any degree rests with the student.

Information regarding academic requirements for graduation is available in the offices of the Registrar, Deans of Schools and Chairs of Departments, and the Vice President for Academic Affairs. It is the responsibility of each student to keep himself or herself apprised of current graduation requirements for a degree program in which he or she is enrolled.

DIRECTORY OF CORRESPONDENCE

For Information on:Write to:
Gifts, Bequests, and Scholarship DonationsPresident
General Information and AdmissionsDirector of Admissions
1-800-338-0082
Graduate ProgramsDirector of Graduate Studies
Financial Aid, Scholarships, Student EmploymentFinancial Aid Counselor
HousingVice President for Student Life
Fees, Expenses, and Method of PaymentVice President for Business and Finance
Course Offerings, Academic Reports, and other Scholastic MattersVice President for Academic Affairs
Transcripts and Records of Former StudentsRegistrar
PublicityVice President for University Relations
AlumniDirector of Development/Alumni Affairs

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES

Areas of Study

B.A.

B.F.A.

B.S.

B.S.N.

B.B.A.

B.S.Ed.

B.A.S.

A.A.S.

Accounting

        

x

       

Art

x

x

 

          

Biology

     

x

           

Chemistry

     

x

           

Computer Information Systems

     

x

           

Computer Science

     

x

           

Dramatic Arts

x

               

Early Childhood Education

           

x

     

English

x

              

English with Professional Writing Option

x

               

Exercise Science/Wellness

           

x

     

Geology

     

x

           

Health & Physical Education

           

x

     

History

x

   

x

           

Management

         

x

       

Management w/ Human Resource Concent.

         

x

       

Marketing

         

x

       

Mathematics

    

x

      

Mathematics w/ Industrial Mathematics Option

         

Middle Grades Education

      

x

   

Music

x

       

Nursing

   

x

    

Political Science

x

 

x

     

Psychology

x

 

x

     

Recreation

     

x

  

Sociology

  

x

     

Special Education

    

 

x

  

Technology Management

      

x

 

Georgia Southwestern State University also offers the Master of Education,  Master of Business Administration,  Master of Science in Computer Science, and the Specialist in Education degree.  A Bachelor of Science dual degree program in cooperation with Georgia Institute of Technology and Associate of Applied Science programs in cooperation with area Technical Colleges are also available.  Certificate programs are also available in the following areas:  European Union Studies, Latin American Studies, Religious Studies and Web Design.

Students wishing to pursue teacher certification at the secondary level should meet with the advisor in their discipline to discuss the appropriate curriculum requirements.

Undergraduate and Graduate course descriptions

The descriptions of the courses offered by each school and department follow the information section and listing of degree programs for each school and department.  Numbers following the description of the course indicate the number of weekly class hours, the number of weekly laboratory or practicum hours, and the credit-hour value of the course expressed in semester hours.  For example, (3-2-3) following the course description means three class hours, two laboratory or practicum hours, and three semester hours of credit.  A "V" in the lab/practicum position indicates that the number of required hours for the course varies according to the individual situation.

CALENDAR*

Summer Term 2003
Fall Semester 2003
Spring Semester 2004
Summer Term 2004
Fall Semester 2004

 
Last Day to Apply for Graduate Admission March 15
Last Day to Apply for Undergraduate Admission for May Term April 21
Last Day to Apply for Undergraduate Admission- Summer Term May 12
Residence Halls Open for May Term - 1:00 p.m. May 11
May Term Registration May 12
eCore classes beginMay 12
May Term Classes Begin May 12
Classes Will Not Meet May 26
Last day of class  for May Term May 29
Final Exams for May Term May 30
Residence Halls Close for May Term - 5:00 p.m May 30
Residence Halls Open for Regular Summer Term - 1:00 p.m June 1
Registration/Orientation June 2
Classes Begin June 3
No Registration or Class Change after This Date June 5
Last day of class  for Summer I Session June 24
Final Exams for Summer I Session June 25
Midterm for Full Session June 26
Registration for Summer II Session June 27
Summer Session II Classes Begin June 30
Last Day to Withdraw from Class without Penalty for Full Session July 3
Classes Will Not Meet July 4
Last day of class  for Summer II Session and Full Session July 22
Final Examinations July 23,24,25
Residence Halls Close 5pm. July 26
 
Last Day to Apply for Graduate Admission June 30
Last Day to Apply for Undergraduate Admission July 21
Last Day for Undergraduate Admission for GSW Students Not Enrolled Spring 2003August 8
Faculty Planning August 11-15
Residence Halls Open for Upperclassmen - 1:00 p.m. August 17
Registration/Orientation August 18
eCore Classes BeginAugust 18
Classes Begin August 19
No Registration or Class Change after This Date August 21
Classes Will Not Meet September 1
Midterm October 10
Last Day to Withdraw from Class without Penalty October 17
Fall BreakOctober 24
Registration for Spring Semester 2004October 27-November 21
Regents’ ExaminationNovember 1,3
Thanksgiving Holidays November 27-28**
Classes End December 5
Final Examinations December 6, 8-11
Residence Halls Close - 5pm December 13
Graduation December 13 (Saturday)
**Classes will be conducted through 5:00pm on Wednesday, November 26, 2003
 
Last Day to Apply for Graduate AdmissionOctober 15
Last Day to Apply for Undergraduate AdmissionDecember 16
Residence Halls Open - 1:00 p.m.January 4
Registration\OrientationJanuary 6
Classes BeginJanuary 7
No Registration or Class Change after This DateJanuary 9
eCore Classes BeginJanuary 12
Classes Will Not MeetJanuary 19
MidtermFebruary 27
Last Day to Withdraw from Class without PenaltyMarch 5
Spring BreakMarch 8-12
Last Day of ClassApril 28
Reading DayApril 29
Final ExaminationsApril 30, May 1, 3-5
Residence Halls Close - 5pm.May 8
GraduationMay 8 (Saturday)
 
Last Day to Apply for Graduate AdmissionMarch 15
Last Day to Apply for Undergraduate Admission for May TermApril 19
Residence Halls Open for May Term - 1:00 p.m.May 9
Last Day to Apply for Undergraduate Admission for Summer TermMay 10
May Term RegistrationMay 10
May Term Classes BeginMay 10
eCore Classes BeginMay 10
Midterm for May TermMay 18
Last Day to Withdraw from May Term without PenaltyMay 20
Last Day of Class for May TermMay 26
Final Exams for May TermMay 27
Residence Halls Close for May Term - 5:00 p.m.May 29
Residence Halls Open for Regular Summer Term - 1:00 p.m.May 30
Classes Will Not MeetMay 31
Registration/OrientationJune 1
Classes BeginJune 2
No Registration or Class Change after This DateJune 4
Midterm for Summer IJune 11
Last Day to Withdraw from Summer I without PenaltyJune 15
Last Day of Class for Summer I SessionJune 23
Final Exams for Summer I SessionJune 24
Midterm for Full SessionJune 25
Registration for Summer II SessionJune 28
Summer Session II Classes BeginJune 29
Last Day to Withdraw from Class without Penalty for Full SessionJuly 2
Classes Will Not MeetJuly 5
Midterm for Summer IIJuly 9
Last Day to Withdraw from Summer II without PenaltyJuly 13
Fall 2004 registration (for students enrolled summer 2004)July 19, 20
Last Day of Class for Summer II Session and Full SessionJuly 21
Final ExaminationsJuly 22,23,24
Residence Halls Close 5pm.July 26
FALL SEMESTER 2004 
Early registration for students enrolled Spring 2004March 15-April 9
Last Day to Apply for Graduate AdmissionJune 30
Last Day to Apply for Undergraduate Admission for New StudentsJuly 21
Faculty Planning WeekAugust 9-13
Residence Halls Open for Upperclassmen- 1:00 p.m.August 15
Registration/OrientationAugust 16-17
Classes BeginAugust 18
No Registration or Class Change After This DateAugust 20
Classes Will Not MeetSeptember 6
MidtermOctober 8
Last Day to Withdraw From  Class Without PenaltyOctober 15
Fall BreakOctober 22
Regents Test ,  8amOctober 30 (Saturday)
Regents Test 12pm and 5pmNovember 1 (Monday)
Thanksgiving HolidaysNovember 25-26**
Last Day of ClassDecember 3
Final ExaminationsDecember 4, 6, 7, 8, 9
Residence Halls Close - 5:00 p.m.December 11
GraduationDecember 11 (Saturday)
**Classes will be conducted through 5:00pm on Wednesday, November 24, 2004

*Calendars are correct at date of printing; subject to change.

Overview

Mission Statement
Confidentiality of Student Records: Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

GEORGIA SOUTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY

Georgia Southwestern State University is a senior unit of the University System of Georgia. The University was founded in 1906 as the Third District Agricultural and Mechanical School. In 1926, it was granted a charter authorizing the school to offer two years of college work and to change the name to Third District Agricultural and Normal College. The name was changed to Georgia Southwestern College in 1932, at which time it was placed under the jurisdiction of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. In 1964, the College became a senior unit of the University System, conferring its first baccalaureate degrees in June of 1968. Graduate work was added to the curriculum in June of 1973. In July 1996, the Board of Regents authorized state university status, and the institution became Georgia Southwestern State University.

Georgia Southwestern State University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097, telephone number 404-679-4501) to award associate, bachelor, master and specialist degrees. The The School of Education is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (2010 Massachusetts Ave NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20036, telephone number 202-466-7496) and all teacher education programs are recognized and approved by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (http://www.gapsc.com).

The Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing is fully accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (61 Broadway 33rd Floor, New York, N.Y. 10006; 212-363-5555) and has the full approval of the Georgia Board of Nursing (237 Coliseum Drive, Macon, GA 31217-3858; 478-207-1300 or 1640).

The School of Business Administration is in its third year of Candidacy for accreditation by AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. AACSB International is located at 600 Emerson Road, Suite 300, St. Louis, MO. 63141-6762 USA, telephone number 314-872-8481, and fax number 314-872-8495.

The School of Business Administration has initial accreditation from the International Association of Collegiate Business Education, PO Box 25217, Overland Park, KS 66225, USA, telephone number 913-631-3009, fax number 913-613-9154. The School of Business Administration is also a member of the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). The Association is located at 7007 College Boulevard, Suite 420, Overland, KS 66211, USA, telephone number 913-339-9356, and fax number 913-339-6226.

The University is located on 250 acres of improved wooded land in the community of Americus, Georgia, 135 miles south of Atlanta. The attractive campus includes recreational areas, a spring-fed lake, and thirty-five buildings.

Mission Statement

Georgia Southwestern State University is a caring community of learning on a residential campus, offering students personalized and challenging experiences in preparation for successful careers, productive citizenship, and a satisfying quality of life. The respected faculty demonstrate intense dedication to teaching and offer outstanding professional programs of study as well as programs in the arts, humanities, and sciences. Learning is strengthened by an effective student-oriented staff committed to the optimal development of each student. The location, atmosphere, and relationships of the University create a stimulating environment for intellectual inquiry in pursuit of truth and knowledge.

Georgia Southwestern State University shares with the other state universities of the University System of Georgia the following core characteristics and purposes:

  •  a commitment to excellence and responsiveness within a scope of influence defined by the needs of an area of the state, and by particularly outstanding programs or distinctive characteristics that have a magnet effect throughout the region or state;
  •  a commitment to a teaching/learning environment, both within and beyond the classroom, that sustains instructional excellence, serves a diverse and college-prepared student body, promotes high levels of student achievement, offers academic assistance, and provides developmental studies programs for a limited cohort;
  •  a high quality general education program supporting a variety of disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and professional academic programming at the baccalaureate level, with selected master and educational specialist degrees, and selected associate degree programs based on area need and/or interinstitutional collaborations;
  •  a commitment to public service, continuing education, technical assistance, cultural offerings, and economic development activities that address the needs, improve the quality of life, and raise the educational level within the University's scope of influence.
  •  a commitment to scholarship and creative work to enhance instructional effectiveness and to encourage faculty scholarly pursuits and a commitment to applied research in selected areas of institutional strength and area need.

Georgia Southwestern State University endorses the following mission statement for the University System of Georgia and envisions its own mission within the context of the principles adopted by the Board of Regents.

The mission for the University System of Georgia is to contribute to the educational, cultural, economic, and social advancement of Georgia by providing excellent undergraduate general education and first-rate programs leading to associate, baccalaureate, master, professional, and doctorate degrees; by pursuing leading-edge basic and applied research, scholarly inquiry, and creative endeavors; and by bringing these intellectual resources to bear on the economic development of the State and the continuing education of its citizens.

Georgia Southwestern State University shares the following characteristics with other institutions in the University System of Georgia:

  •  a supportive campus climate, leadership and development opportunities, and necessary services, all to meet the needs of students, faculty and staff;
  •  cultural, ethnic, racial, and gender diversity in the faculty, staff, and student body, supported by practices and programs that embody the ideals of an open, democratic, and global society;
  •  technology to advance educational purposes, including instructional technology, student support services, and distance education; and
  •  a commitment to sharing physical, human, information, and other resources in collaboration with other System institutions, State agencies, local schools, and technical institutes to expand and enhance programs and services available to the citizens of Georgia.

The programs and educational opportunities at Georgia Southwestern State University are characterized by the following distinctive features.

As a residential, comprehensive university, Georgia Southwestern serves a diverse student body, primarily drawn from southwest Georgia, with programs leading to associate, bachelor, master, and education specialist degrees. A growing number of students from across the state as well as international and out-of-state students are also attracted by programs in a number of different areas. For example, international students are attracted to Georgia Southwestern State University's Asian Studies Center, which develops and delivers instructional programs in language and culture. In addition, mature learners are drawn from the region as well as across the nation to the Center for Elderhostel Studies, the second largest Elderhostel program in the U.S.

As a community of learning, Georgia Southwestern faculty and staff are dedicated to creating an environment which promotes the optimal development of all students. The educational experience at Georgia Southwestern is characterized by small class sizes, technology enhanced instruction, and opportunities to work with faculty on research and service projects. In addition, meaningful internships, work study appointments, and practicum experiences in a number of businesses and community agencies, including the international headquarters of Habitat For Humanity, are vital elements in creating this environment for learning.

Georgia Southwestern fulfills its commitment to research and public service through the individual efforts of an outstanding faculty and the focused activities of specific centers, which rely heavily on external funding. The Rosalynn Carter Institute serves as a regional and national focal point for research and public service in the area of caregiving. The Center For Business and Economic Development conducts research on regional economic issues and facilitates development activities in the region. The program in Third World Studies has served as the guiding force in the development of a professional association and journal contributing to Georgia Southwestern's international reputation. The Center for Community Based Theater, a unique, emerging partnership with the City of Americus, provides opportunities for students, faculty, and community members to explore topics and develop dramatic productions that are drawn from the culture of the community.

Georgia Southwestern State University aspires to become recognized nationally as a state university which is committed to learning and is responsive to the educational, social, and cultural needs of the region.

Confidentiality of Student Records: Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

1. Georgia Southwestern State University is covered by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), as amended, which is designed to protect students' rights in regard to education records maintained by the institution. Under the Act, students have the following rights:

a. the right to inspect and review education records maintained by the institution that pertain to you;
b. the right to challenge the content of records (except grades which can only be challenged through the Grade Appeal Process) on the grounds that they are inaccurate, misleading or a violation of your privacy or other rights; and
c. the right to control disclosures from your education records with certain exceptions.

2. Any student who is or has been in attendance at Georgia Southwestern State University has the right to inspect and review his or her educational records within a reasonable period of time (not to exceed 45 days) after making a written request. However, the student shall not have access to:

a. Financial records of parents.
b. Confidential letters of recommendation placed in record prior to January 1, 1975.
c. Letters of recommendation concerning admission, application for employment or honors for which the student has voluntarily signed a waiver.

3. Directory information will be treated as public information and be generally available on all students and former students, at the discretion of the university. Directory information includes the student's name; telephone number; major field of study; dates of attendance; degrees, honors and awards received; level, and full or part time status. Participation in officially recognized sports; height, weight, age, home-town and general interest items of members of athletic teams is also included in Directory Information.

4. Requests for Education Records should be made in writing to the Registrar, Georgia Southwestern State University. "Education Records" means generally any record maintained by or for Georgia Southwestern State University and containing information directly related to the students' academic activities.

5. Students who challenge the correctness of student educational records shall file a written request for amendment with the Registrar. The student shall also present to the Registrar copies of all available evidence relating to the data or material being challenged. The Registrar shall forward the information to the custodian of the record who will consider the request and shall notify the student in writing within 15 business days whether the request will be granted or denied. During that time, any challenge may be settled informally between the student, or the parents of a dependent student and the custodian of the records, in consultation with other appropriate University officials. If an agreement is reached it shall be in writing and signed by all parties involved. A copy of such agreement will be maintained in the student's record. If an agreement is not reached informally or, if the request for amendment is denied, the student shall have the right to challenge through the Grievance Procedure outlined in the Student Handbook.

6. Release of protected information in the student's educational record without consent will be allowed to:

a. Institutional personnel who have a legitimate educational interest.
b. Officials of other schools where the student seeks to enroll. Efforts will be made to notify the student of the release of such information.
c. Representatives of Federal agencies authorized by law to have access to education records, and state education authorities.
d. Appropriate persons in connection with a student's application for or receipt of financial aid.
e. State and local officials to whom information must be released pursuant to a state statue adopted prior to November 19, 1974.
f. Organizations conducting studies for the institution.
g. Accrediting organizations.
h. Parents of a dependent student, as determined by the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, as amended.
i. Persons necessary in emergency situations to protect health and safety.
j. Persons designated in subpoenas or court orders.

7. If a request for Education Records is not covered by the Annual Disclosure Statement provided by the Registrar, the written request for release of information should be submitted to the Registrar and contain the following information:

a. Specific records to be released.
b. Reasons for such release.
c. To whom records are to be released.
d. Date.
e. Signature of the student.

8. Records will be released in compliance with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena. However, reasonable efforts will be made to notify the student in advance of compliance.

9. Students have the right to obtain copies of official transcripts provided all financial obligations to the University have been met. Students will be charged at the prevailing rate for each certified transcript obtained. Copies of other information in the student's education record will be provided at a cost of $0.25 per page of copy.

10. Students who feel that their rights have been violated under the provisions of the Family Educational and Privacy Act should write to the following office: Department of Education, 330 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20201.

11. Georgia has an Open Records Act. All records kept by Georgia Southwestern State University, except those protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, are subject to public open records requests. Requests for public open records should be submitted in writing to the Director of Human Resources, Georgia Southwestern State University.

ADMISSIONS

UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA

College Preparatory Curriculum

The following courses are required of students graduating from high school in the spring of 2000 or later who plan to enroll in regular University programs leading to the baccalaureate degree at institutions of the University System of Georgia. Students who graduated high school from spring 1988 through spring 1999 are required to meet the College Preparatory Curriculum requirements in effect at that time.

Course (Units)   Instructional Emphasis
English (4)   -Grammar and usage
   -Literature (American & World)
   -Advanced composition skills
Science (3)    -Physical Science
   -At least two laboratory courses from Biology, Chemistry, or Physics
Mathematics (4)   -Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, and one course higher than Geometry
Social Science (3)   -American History
   -World History
   -Economics and Government
Foreign Language (2)   -Skill-building courses emphasizing speaking, listening, reading, and writing in the same language
Two additional courses from the following are also recommended:  -Humanities and Literature (Mythology- Greek, Roman, Norse; oral/written  communication)
   -Math-another unit higher than the fourth above
   -An additional laboratory course in science
   -A third course in a foreign language or study in a second foreign language
   -Fine Arts (art, dance, drama, music)
   -Social Science (Psychology, Anthropology, Sociology, Business Law, World Geography, Asian or Latin American or Middle East Studies)
   -Advanced Placement Computer Science A or AB

ADMISSIONS GENERAL POLICIES

Georgia Southwestern seeks to enroll students with inquiring and creative minds who will profit from advanced educational programs in an atmosphere of freedom with responsibility. Admission standards at the University are designed to identify students who have potential for success in the educational programs of the University. Acceptance is based upon the applicant's previous academic record, entrance examination scores and, when necessary, upon results of personal interviews and psychological tests or other appropriate tests which help determine general fitness for admission to the University. Applicants are considered for admission without regard to race, color, creed, age, sex, veteran status, disability, or national origin.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

Undergraduate admission forms may be obtained from high school and two-year college counseling offices, by writing directly to the Office of Admissions, Georgia Southwestern State University, Americus, Georgia 31709, or by e-mail to gswapps@canes.gsw.edu. The application may be obtained and completed on the Georgia Southwestern website at www.gsw.edu.

Applications should be accompanied by a $20 application fee and submitted for consideration at least 20 days prior to the date of registration. A medical history and proof of required immunizations are mandatory for all students who are accepted to the University. Health forms are mailed to accepted students along with housing information by the Office of Student Life.

An applicant who fails to enroll in the semester for which he or she is accepted must reapply for admission if he or she wishes to enter the University at a later time.

When the application forms, ACT/SAT scores, and other required records of the applicant are found to be complete, the applicant will be evaluated in terms of test scores, grades, scholastic aptitude, social and psychological adjustment, and the probability of completing the requirements for the desired degree. The University reserves the right to reject any applicant whose general records and aptitude do not indicate a probability of success in the University environment, notwithstanding the satisfaction of other requirements.

If it appears to the Director of Admissions for undergraduates that the educational needs of an applicant can best be met at some other institution within the University System of Georgia, the Director shall refer the applicant to that institution. In order that the appraisal of a student's ability and fitness for University work may be accurate as nearly as possible, officials of the University will study carefully all information that is submitted by the applicant and may require any applicant to furnish additional data. The officials of the University shall have the right to require each applicant for admission to appear for an interview before the application is finally accepted or rejected. The Director of Admissions for undergraduates will notify the applicant of the time and place at which the interview will be conducted.

The decision as to whether an applicant shall be accepted or rejected shall be made by the Director of Admissions for undergraduates. The decision is subject to the applicant's right of appeal, as provided by the bylaws of the University and the Board of Regents of the University System. The Director of Admissions for undergraduates will refer appeals to the Admissions Committee for review. The Committee will forward its recommendation to the Office of Vice President for Academic Affairs for a decision. The applicant shall be informed of the action taken upon the application from the Director of Admissions for undergraduates.

Specific requirements for admission as a beginning freshman, transient, early admission, joint enrollment, or provisional student may be found as follows.

BEGINNING FRESHMEN

1. The applicant must complete and file with the Director of Admissions for undergraduates an application form accompanied by the applicant's photograph and $20 non-refundable application fee. The application must be filed at least twenty days before the beginning of the term in which the applicant wishes to enroll. An application cannot be considered until the application form has been properly executed and filed with the Admissions Office. No application will be processed unless it is accompanied by the $20 application fee.

2. The applicant must submit a transcript of his or her high school record. He or she should ask the guidance counselor of the high school(s) attended to send the transcript(s) directly to the Director of Admissions for undergraduates. The applicant should have a preliminary transcript submitted covering the work completed at the time the application is submitted and listing the courses in which currently enrolled. At the time of graduation, he or she should request the guidance counselor to submit to the Director of Admissions for undergraduates a final high school transcript showing the date of graduation.

High school credit in the following areas is required:

  Units
English   4
Mathematics   4
Social Science   3
Natural Science   3
Foreign Language   2
Electives   2

The University reserves the right to refuse any of the credits from any high school or other institution, notwithstanding its accredited status. The judgment of the University on this question shall be final.

3. The applicant must submit an official record of minimum satisfactory scores obtained on either the ACT Assessment [English score of 18 and Math score of 17] or the College Board's SAT [Verbal score of 430 and Math score of 400]. Further information and application forms may be secured from a high school guidance counselor or the registrar of any institution in the University System of Georgia. One may also write directly to ACT Registration, P.O. Box 414, Iowa City, Iowa 52243 or to the College Board, CN6200, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6200.

4. All new students are required to submit proof of required immunizations prior to their enrollment.

5. The applicant shall be required to report to the University for freshman orientation prior to the beginning of the initial term of enrollment. Information will be mailed to the student regarding orientation by the Office of Admissions.

The following is a summary of the requirements a beginning freshman must satisfy prior to enrollment in the University:

1. Application with fee and photograph.
2. Official results of ACT or SAT.
3. Preliminary high school transcript.
4. Proof of required immunizations.
6. Personal interview (if deemed necessary by Director of Admissions for undergraduates).

NON-TRADITIONAL STUDENTS

Any applicant who satisfies the following may be admitted on a non-traditional student basis:

1. Has graduated from an accredited high school or satisfied requirements for the General Educational Development (GED) Equivalency Certificate.
2. Has been out of high school or previous college five years or longer or is 25 years or older.
3. Has earned fewer than 30 transferable semester credit hours.

Any student admitted in Non-Traditional Student status will be required to complete a placement inventory at the beginning of the first semester of enrollment. The placement inventory will include placement testing (the University System-wide placement examination) to determine academic deficiencies and a conference with the academic advisor, during which a plan will be developed that will best meet the needs of the non-traditional student.

Students in this category will be required to enroll in Learning Support courses if test results on the placement examination identify a deficiency in reading, mathematics, or English. Once the student is placed in Learning Support courses, he or she will be classified as a Learning Support student and will be required to meet all Learning Support requirements for exit.

A non-traditional student may gain regular admission by meeting regular admission requirements or by completing Learning Support Program requirements, if applicable.

ALTERNATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR HOME-SCHOOLED STUDENTS AND GRADUATES OF NONACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOLS

Applicants from home schools or graduates of nonaccredited high schools may validate the CPC in an alternative way. SAT I scores and satisfactory documentation of equivalent competence in each of the CPC areas at the college preparatory level may be used in lieu of the Freshman Index and Carnegie unit requirements of the CPC. A student whose SAT I Composite (Verbal plus Mathematics) score is at or above the average SAT I score of the previous year's fall semester first-time freshman admitted to the USG institution to which he or she is applying and who has completed the equivalent of each of the CPC areas as documented by a portfolio of work and/or other evidence that substantiates CPC completion qualifies for consideration for admission. For students with ACT scores, the ACT composite score comparable (according to the tables from the joint study by ACT, ETS, and the College Board) to the average SAT I total score is required. Students in this category must also meet the minimum SAT I Verbal (or ACT English) requirement and the minimum SAT I Mathematics (or ACT Math) requirement for the sector to which they apply.

Applicants who achieve designated scores on each of the following SAT II Subject Tests in a CPC area will be considered to have demonstrated equivalent CPC competence and do not need to submit additional documentation in that area: English Writing, Literature, Math IC or Math IIC, American History & Social Studies, World History, Biology, and one of the following: Chemistry or Physics.

  • MATHEMATICS--To show equivalence with four required CPC mathematics courses (Algebra I and II, Geometry, and one course higher than Geometry), students are required to achieve a score of 500 on the SAT II Math IC test or a score of 570 on the SAT II Math IIC test in order to satisfy the CPC mathematics requirement. A student not passing either test would have, if admitted as a Presidential Exception, four deficiencies and must be tested for placement into LS. 
  • ENGLISH--To show equivalence with four required CPC English courses, students are required to achieve a score of 520 on the SAT II English Writing test and a score of 530 on the SAT II Literature test in order to satisfy the CPC English requirement. Achievement of the indicated score on either test will provide credit for two years of CPC English, and achievement of the indicated scores on both tests will provide credit for all four years of CPC English. A student passing only one test would have, if admitted as a Presidential Exception, two deficiencies and must be tested for placement into LS.
  • SCIENCE--To show equivalence with three required CPC Science courses (including one laboratory course from the life sciences and one laboratory course from the physical sciences), students are required to achieve a score of 520 on the SAT II Biology test and a score of 540 on the SAT Chemistry test OR a score of 590 on the SAT II Physics test in order to satisfy the CPC Science requirement. A student passing only one of the two required tests would have, if admitted as a Presidential Exception, two deficiencies.
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE--To show equivalence with three required CPC Social Science courses (including one course focusing on United States studies, one course focusing on world studies, and a third Carnegie unit in this area), students are required to achieve a score of 560 on the SAT II American History and Social Studies test and a score of 540 on the SAT II World History test. A student passing only one of the two required tests would have, if admitted as a Presidential Exception, two deficiencies.
  • FOREIGN LANGUAGE--To show equivalence with two years of high school study of a single foreign language, students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in both oral and written components. Depending on the level of proficiency, a student may have no, one, or two deficiencies.

JOINT ENROLLMENT/EARLY ADMISSION (Post-Secondary Option)

A program of joint enrollment and early admission is available at Georgia Southwestern State University for high school students who have completed their sophomore year.

A student admitted for joint enrollment may begin course study during the junior and/or senior year and during the summer following the junior year.

A student admitted for early admission would enroll as a regular beginning freshman, thereby omitting the senior year of high school.

Residence hall and dining hall facilities are available during the summer for students who do not live within commuting distance of the University.

Admission Standards: Joint Enrollment and Early Admission

1. Minimum total Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT I) score of 970 or ACT Assessment composite score of 20;
2. Minimum score of 480 on the verbal SAT and 440 on the mathematics SAT; or on ACT-E score of 20 and ACT-M score of 18.
3. Minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 3.0 in college preparatory courses;
4. Written approval (joint enrollment) or written recommendation (early admission) of high school principal;
5. Written consent of parent or guardian (if the student is a minor);
6. Completion of the University System of Georgia College Preparatory Curriculum requirements with the following exceptions:
a. Students with SAT verbal scores of at least 530 or ACT-E score of 23 who have not completed the final unit of high school English, Math, and/or social studies may be permitted to fulfill these high school requirements with the appropriate University courses taken through the joint enrollment or early admissions program.
b. Students who have not completed the College Preparatory Curriculum requirements may be admitted through the joint enrollment program if they are enrolled in the necessary high school courses and scheduled to complete the requirements by the end of their senior year.
In addition, students who elect to be jointly enrolled at their high schools and at Georgia Southwestern must satisfy the following conditions:
a. Continue to be carried on the official roll of their high school.
b. Minimum University enrollment of three hours per semester.
c. May enroll for 12 semester hours during the summer term preceding their senior year provided they are enrolled for no high school credit during that term.

Credit is validated for the student after receipt of the high school diploma.

A high school student who meets all the requirements above except the test scores and/or the grade average may enroll as a personal development student (see section entitled Auditors/Personal Development). A student in this category may enroll for the same number of courses as a joint enrollee but, as a personal development student, will receive no academic credit. Study on this basis is designed primarily as an enrichment experience for the student.

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Students who apply for this joint degree program must meet the admissions requirements of the approved technical college. Students must also meet the regular admissions requirements at Georgia Southwestern State University.

The SAT or ACT scores necessary for admission to GSW are required of all students who graduated from high school within the last five years. Students who did not graduate in the last five years or who are 25 years or older must provide the required SAT or ACT scores or take the Compass Placement Test for possible placement in the Learning Support Program.

The sixteen-unit distribution of College Preparatory Curriculum in high school is also required of students who graduated from high school within the last two years.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT

Georgia Southwestern State University offers advanced placement for beginning students in several fields. Each academic division at the University determines how credit in that division shall be granted. Official copies of test scores must be received before credit can be awarded. Additional information about advanced placement may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar.

REGENTS’ TEST EXEMPTIONS

Upon admission to GSW, students with the appropriate minimum test scores listed below on nationally administered standardized tests will have satisfied the Regents Testing requirements. In order to exempt the Regents Reading Test Requirement, students must have one of the following scores:

  •  S.A.T. Verbal score of 510 or greater
  •  A.C.T. Reading score of 23 or greater

In order to exempt the Regents Essay Test Requirement, students must have one of the following scores:

  • Advanced Placement English score of 3 or greater
  • International Baccalaureate higher-level English score of 4 or greater
  • S.A.T. II English Writing score of 650 or greater

Students are not permitted to re-test after the point of admission. If a student exempts one part of the Regents Test Requirements, the student must satisfy the remaining part. Students can review their status on the GSW transcript that is available on RAIN. Students who were admitted to GSW through an Institutional administration of the S.A.T. exam will not be eligible for this exemption.

If a student is unsure of which test administration they attended, they should contact the Registrars Office, located in Sanford Hall.

Transfer students entering GSW from a University System of Georgia Institution will have their Regents Test Requirements updated based on the information from the official transcript of the prior school.

Transfer students from private institutions or out-of-state schools will be required to produce one of the following types of documents in order to exempt Regents:

  •  Official S.A.T. or A.C.T. scores
  • Official letter from the Registrar of the prior institution, including the school seal, verifying test scores were from a nationally >administered test.

TRANSFER STUDENTS

All regulations applying to newly admitted freshmen are applicable to students transferring from other colleges.

A student transferring from another college must have official transcripts from all colleges previously attended sent to the Director of Admissions for undergraduates of Georgia Southwestern State University. The Director of Admissions for undergraduates will determine the applicant's academic qualifications for admission on the basis of these college transcripts.

The Director of Admissions for undergraduates of Georgia Southwestern State University reserves the right to reject the application and all or any part of previously earned credits if there is reason to believe that the quality of the educational program of the institution that the applicant last attended is unsatisfactory.

Transfer Admission Requirements and Standards

  • Transfer students from another college must have official transcripts from all colleges previously attended sent to the Director of Admissions for undergraduates of Georgia Southwestern State University.
  • Transfer students should be in good standing at the last institution attended, having a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale.
  • Transfer students with fewer than 30 semester hours of acceptable academic credit must submit an official record of scores obtained on the College Entrance Examination Board's Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT) and an official copy of the high school transcript.
  • Transfer students with fewer than 30 total semester hours of transfer credit must meet the admissions requirement for beginning students, and therefore, may be required to enroll in the Learning Support Program. The Director of Undergraduate Admissions should be contacted for details concerning Learning Support requirements.
  • Transfer students who have participated in and have successfully completed the Learning Support Program at another college in the University System of Georgia may be admitted as regular students provided all other entrance requirements are met. Students enrolled in Learning Support at another college in the University System of Georgia are required to exit the program before transferring to Georgia Southwestern.

Students who have completed a transferable associate degree at an accredited college or university will be admitted as regular students without any referral to Learning Support. Students who have completed an associate degree at a technical college accredited by the Commission on Colleges (COC) will also be admitted as a regular student without any referral to Learning Support.

Following are the requirements which the transfer student must satisfy prior to enrollment:

  1. Application with $20 fee and photograph.
  2. Official transcripts from each college attended.
  3. SAT/ACT scores and high school transcript if fewer than 30 semester hours of acceptable academic credit are transferred.
  4. Completed pre-entrance medical report and proof of required immunizations.
  5. Personal interview (if deemed necessary by Director of Admissions).
  6. Students who have registered in other colleges may not disregard their records at these institutions. Failure to report previous college attendance at the time of application is sufficient cause for cancellation of the student's enrollment and of any credit earned.
  7. An applicant will not be considered for admission unless the transcript of the college or university last attended shows honorable discharge or unless the officials of the institution last attended recommend the applicant's admission. However, if two or more calendar years have elapsed since the applicant's dismissal from the last college or university attended, the admitting institution may review the application through established procedures to determine whether or not admission should be granted. (BR Minutes, 1983-84, p. 35)

TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY

Transfer credit is normally awarded for all college work earned through any college or university approved by its regional accrediting association, provided the courses presented reasonably parallel the curriculum of Georgia Southwestern State University. The following stipulations on the transfer of credit are upheld:

1. Transfer of D credit:

Only courses completed at accredited institutions will be accepted in transfer.

  • All credit earned in 1000 and 2000 level courses used to satisfy Core Curriculum requirements will be accepted, except for English 1101 and English 1102, which require minimum grades of C.
  • Credit earned in upper level undergraduate courses requires a minimum grade of C.

2. Students who have only partially completed Core requirements at another unit of the University System of Georgia will receive credit in courses completed. Students who have completed one or more Core Area requirements at another unit of the University System of Georgia will receive full transfer credit for those Core Areas. Students who change their major upon transferring may be required to complete requirements in Areas D and F for the new major.

3. Coursework taken in two-year college technical programs is generally non-transferable. Technical courses may be considered as a component of a portfolio by the Prior Learning Portfolio Committee.

4. Coursework taken at two-year Technical Colleges which are accredited through the Commission on Colleges will be considered in transfer if the course numbering is 190 or above. Courses taken at Technical Colleges accredited through an agency other than the Commission on Colleges will not be accepted in transfer, regardless of the course numbering.

5. Students requesting credit for prior learning experiences in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Technology Management must submit the following documents to the BAS in Technology Management Advisor for consideration:

  • A narrative explaining how prior learning is related to technology management. The narrative must describe relative experience and evidence identifying the learning the student acquired and how the learning can be used to solve problems or generalized for use in other situations.
  • Documentation that the student has actually acquired the learning related to technology.
  • Documentation to show that the prior learning experience is equivalent to the number of credit hours requested.

6. Transfer students must meet residency requirements outlined in the Degree Requirements section of this catalog.

7. Credit earned through correspondence, credit by examination and extension work is accepted, but limited to 30 semester hours.

8. Credits accepted in transfer by Georgia Southwestern State University do not necessarily apply as hours toward graduation.

9. Credit hours only are transferred; grades are not.

A student transferring to GSW with a transferable Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree from a college or university within the University System of Georgia will have met the GSW core requirements as long as the student does not change majors. Core courses required by GSW but not by the student's previous institution may have to be taken to prepare the student for upper division course work. However, the student will not be required to complete more than a total of 120 semester credit hours, excluding physical education and orientation, to earn the degree. Students in this category who change majors may have additional core courses to complete, particularly in Core Areas D and F.

A student transferring to GSW with an Associate of Applied Science or an Associate of Science in Nursing degree from a college or university within the University System of Georgia will be required to meet GSW core requirements. Core courses already completed at the previous institution will be considered on a course-by-course basis.

TRANSIENT STUDENTS

A student who has taken work in another college or university may apply for the privilege of temporary enrollment in Georgia Southwestern State University. Such a student will ordinarily be one who expects to return to the college or university in which previously enrolled.

The following policies shall govern the admission of students under transient status:

1. An applicant for admission as a transient student must present from the registrar of the institution last attended a statement recommending admission as a transient student. The statement should include the courses in which the student will be permitted to enroll.

2. The Director of Admissions for undergraduates at Georgia Southwestern State University must have evidence that the institution in which the student previously attended is an accredited or approved institution.

3. Even though the institution that the student last attended is an accredited institution, the Director of Admissions for undergraduates at Georgia Southwestern State University may reject the application if there is reason to believe that the quality of the educational program of that institution is unsatisfactory.

4. An applicant will be accepted as a transient student only when the applicant's previous academic work appears satisfactory. The Director of Admissions for undergraduates shall have the right to require the applicant to submit a transcript of previous college work.

5. Since the University is primarily obligated to its regularly enrolled students, Georgia Southwestern State University will consider the acceptance of transient students only when their acceptance will cause no hardship to the University or its regularly enrolled students.

6. Transient students must present proof of required immunizations prior to enrollment.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

In addition to requirements for admission listed elsewhere in this section, international students must also submit the following items:

1. An official report of scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and a statement from a school official indicating that the student has proficiency in the use of the English language sufficient to accomplish college work. A minimum computerized TOEFL score of 193 (523 on paper test) is required for regular admission.

a. TOEFL 193 and above
-required to write the compass math placement test for possible placement in Learning Support
-may enroll in regular credit English core course
-exempt from CPC

b. SAT/ACT scores without TOEFL

-with SAT/ACT English and math scores above cut-off for regular university admission, exempt from compass placement testing, ELI, CPC
-with SAT/ACT math score below cut-off for regular university admission, must write math placement test for possible placement in Learning Support
-with SAT/ACT English score below cut-off for regular university admission, must write placement English tests for possible placement in ELI

c. No TOEFL score or TOEFL less than 193: Admission to the English Language Institute

-required to enroll in ELI (institutional credit)
-required to write the compass math placement test when accepted into the regular university program by the Office of Admissions
-exempt from CPC

d. International graduate students are CPC and placement testing exempt.

e. International Rotary students are CPC and placement testing exempt.

NOTE: If international students are enrolled in a four-year degree program, they are required to meet the Regents' Test requirements at the local level (departmental Regents' Test or the Standard Regents' Test) after they have earned 30 academic hours. If international students fail to pass the Regents' Test or its equivalent test, they will be required to enroll in a Regents' remediation course.

2. A pre-entrance medical form (supplied by the University) must be completed by the student and a physician.

3. A certified statement from the student's family, bank, or government that finances are available to cover educational expenses. There is no available program for granting financial aid to foreign students.

4. Proof that the student is covered by a health and accident insurance plan annually.

5. All official international transcripts must have a foreign credential evaluation completed. Applications for this service can be obtained in the Registrar's Office , or online at the following web address:
http://gsw.edu/Admissions/Who/International/index

F-1 International Students

Georgia Southwestern State University is part of the Department of Homeland Security’s Student Exchange and Visitor Information System (SEVIS). Through this system, the university has become a liason between GSW international students and a number of government agencies. To meet federal obligations imposed by these agencies, Georgia Southwestern State University is required to report certain personal, academic, and employment related data on international students and scholars to the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration.

Georgia Southwestern State University is dedicated to enabling international students to accomplish their educational goals on our campus so long as the student maintains visa status and abides by the policies of the university. In an effort to assist students with immigration matters, each international student has been assigned a Designated School Official (DSO). All F-1 international students must consult a DSO before making any changes that will affect their immigration status. These changes include, but are not limited to, a change of major, a change of degree program, a change of address, a change of school, etc.

Classification   Designated School Offiical
(DSO)  
Assistant Designated School Official (ADSO)
Undergraduate Student   Mrs. Lynda Lee Purvis
Associate Dean of Academic Affairs
 Mrs. Sundai Tanner, 
Admissions Specialist
Graduate Students   Mrs. Lois Oliver, 
Graduate Admissions  
 Ms. Rebecca Clark, 
Assistant Designated School Official (ADSO)

Beginning Fall 2003, F-1 international students will be required to attend an international student orientation session at the beginning of each semester. The orientation session will inform and remind students of general international regulations that may affect their stay in the United States. As part of the orientation, students will be issued an International Student Handbook to use as a reference for international questions and concerns.

MAINTAINING F-1 VISA STATUS

In order for international students to maintain a valid F-1 Visa status, the following conditions must be met:

  1. Maintain a valid passport at all times.
  2. Attend the University that the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration (BCIS) has authorized you to attend by stamping your I-20 when you entered the U.S., or by being notified of your transfer to another school.
  3. Continue to carry a full course of study (12 hours for undergraduate students, 9 hours for graduate students) each regular semester (fall and spring).
  4. Apply with your Designated School Official promptly for an extension of stay if you are unable to complete your program of study by the ending date on your I-20.
  5. Apply with your Designated School Official for proper documentation to notify BCIS of a change of education level and/or a change in major.
  6. Do not change schools without first contacting your Designated School Official for proper documentation.
  7. Do not engage in any employment without proper authorization.
  8. Limit on-campus employment to 20 hours per week while school is in session.
  9. Report a change of address to the ADSO or DSO and the Registrar’s Office within 10 days of the change.
  10. Carry approved health insurance coverage.
  11. Request travel documents from your ADSO or DSO in advance of leaving the U.S.

AUDITORS/PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDENTS

Applicants wishing only to audit courses or take them for personal development are exempt from taking the ACT/SAT. Although no credit is earned, certain admission requirements must be met and regular fees paid. Auditors and Personal Development students will be required to submit the following items:

1. Application with $20 non-refundable fee.
2. A recent photograph.
3. Proof of high school graduation or equivalency (GED).
4. Proof of required immunizations.

STUDENTS AGE 62 OR OLDER

Georgia citizens who have reached the age of 62 may enroll at Georgia Southwestern State University under a special program authorized by the University System of Georgia. To be eligible for enrollment in this program such persons must meet the following requirements:

1. Must be residents of Georgia, 62 years of age or older at the time of registration, and present a birth certificate or other comparable written documentation of age to enable the registrar to determine eligibility.
2. May enroll as regular or auditing students in courses offered for resident credit on a "space available" basis without payment of fees, except for supplies, laboratory, or shop fees.
3. Must in general meet all System and institution undergraduate or graduate admission requirements to include high school graduation, ACT/SAT scores, and Learning Support, if enrolling for credit. In exceptional cases where circumstances indicate that certain requirements such as high school graduation and SAT/ACT scores requirements are inappropriate, the University may waive one or more of these requirements. The University may provide diagnostic methods to determine whether or not participation in Learning Support will be required prior to enrollment in regular credit.
4. Will have all usual student and institutional records maintained.
5. Must meet all System, institution, and legislated degree requirements such as Regents' Test and History and Constitution Instruction or Exams, if they are degree-seeking students.
6. Must submit proof of required immunizations.

READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS

Former students who have not been in attendance for one calendar year or more must reapply through the Registrar's Office. Students who were on academic suspension at the time of their withdrawal are required to obtain the approval of the Vice President for Academic Affairs for readmission.

Students who have attended another college since last attending Georgia Southwestern must submit an official transcript from that institution.

Students readmitted or reinstated will be evaluated for graduation from the catalog in effect at the time of readmission or reinstatement or any catalog in effect during subsequent periods of continuous enrollment.

ACADEMIC RENEWAL

The Academic Renewal policy allows University System of Georgia degree-seeking students who have experienced academic difficulty at an institution to have one opportunity to make a fresh start at that same institution after an absence of five calendar years from any and all colleges or universities. See the Registrar for complete details.

Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Courses

A student with senior standing at Georgia Southwestern State University with an overall academic grade point average of 3.0 or better may register for graduate courses during the final two terms of undergraduate work subject to the following regulations.

(1) No more than nine hours of graduate credit may be earned.
(2) The maximum course load when enrolled in one or more graduate courses is 15 hours per semester.
(3) Courses taken for graduate credit cannot be counted toward meeting undergraduate degree requirements.
(4) Permission to register for graduate courses must be granted by the Vice President for Academic Affairs prior to registration.

Permission forms are available in the Registrar's Office as well as on RAIN.

GRADUATE STUDENTS

Students seeking admission to Graduate Studies should consult the Graduate Studies section of the Georgia Southwestern State University Bulletin for admission requirements.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

In accordance with regulations of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, all matriculation charges, board, room rent, or other charges are subject to change at the end of any semester.

BUSINESS REGULATIONS

Georgia Southwestern State University, as a unit of the University System of Georgia, receives the major portion of its operating funds from the State of Georgia through appropriations.

The academic year is divided into two semesters of approximately fifteen weeks and a summer term.

Certain regulations must be observed to conform with the policies of the Board of Regents. Fees and charges are due and payable at the beginning of each term at the time of registration. Registration is not complete until all fees have been paid. Students should not begin to register without having sufficient funds to pay all fees.

A student who is delinquent in his or her financial obligations to the University, or to any facet of the University community, will not be allowed to register for the next term, to transfer credits to another school, or to graduate from the University. In some instances the financially delinquent student may be enjoined by the appropriate University official from attending classes for which enrolled and/or from taking final examinations.

A student with outstanding financial obligations to the University, or any facet of the University community, must submit payment in cash for these obligations prior to the release of any refund and/or payroll check(s). Such penalties will accrue in addition to the penalties described above.

Fulfillment of financial obligations restores the student to one's prior status as a member of the University community, except for academic losses which accrue as a normal result of the prior financial irresponsibility.

If any check is not paid on presentation to the bank on which it is drawn, a service charge of $15 or 5 percent of the face amount of the check, whichever is greater, will be charged. When two checks have been returned by any student's bank without payment, check cashing privileges will be suspended.

The health service fee provides for limited medical care in the University Health Center and is charged all students taking five or more semester hours on campus.

The student activity fee is assessed to all students taking five or more semester hours on campus. It provides financial support for a broad program of literary, dramatic, musical, and social activities and defrays most of the expenses of publishing the newspaper and other University publications.

The athletic fee is charged all students taking five or more semester hours on campus. It contributes to the financial support of inter-collegiate athletic activities.

The technology fee is assessed to all students.

SEMESTER FEES

All matriculation charges, board, room rates, and other charges are subject to change. The following fees are in effect for fiscal year 2003.

Full-time Students: (12 or more hours)

   Undergraduate   Graduate
Matriculation   $ 1,106.00   $1,327.00
Matriculation Non Resident   $4,424.00   $5,308.00
Health Service Fee   $ 61.00   $ 61.00
Activity Fee   $ 60.00   $ 60.00
Athletic Fee   $ 110.00   $ 110.00
Postal Fee   $ 8.00   $ 8.00
Computer Technology Fee   $ 38.00   $ 38.00

Part-time Students: (Fewer than 12 hours)

Students enrolled in a single course will pay $93 per undergraduate semester hour and $111 per graduate semester hour (Georgia residents) or $369 per undergraduate semester hour and $443 per graduate semester hour (out-of-state). Students enrolled for FIVE semester hours or more on campus pay an additional $239.00 (Student Activity Fee,  Athletic Fee,  Health Service Fee, and  Postal Fee).

NOTE: All Students, regardless of number of hours, are required to pay the $38 Technology Fee.

Food Service: (Three meal plans available)

21 Meals per week (Monday thru Sunday)   $1,022.00
15 Meals per week (Monday thru Sunday)   $992.00
10 Meals per week (Any 10 meals Monday thru Sunday)   $889.00

All students housed on campus with less than 60 credit hours will purchase one of the above meal plans. No refund will be made on any meal plan purchases unless the student withdraws from the University. Off-campus students may purchase a meal ticket if desired.

Residence Hall Rates

Double Occupancy   $ 1,080.00
Single Occupancy   $1,520.00
Double Occupancy, twelve month   $1,247.00
Single Occupancy, twelve month   $1,740.00

Parking Fees: (All students who plan to operate

a vehicle on campus) Annual: Fall-Summer   $ 16.00
($9 Spring-Summer, $5 Summer only) 

Other Fees:

Applied Music Fee - 1 hour per week instruction   $120.00
Science Lab Fee (for select Chemistry & Biology Courses)   $ 15.00

Matriculation Fee and Deposit

Each application for admission, graduate and undergraduate, must be accompanied by a $20 non-refundable application fee. Undergraduate students are required to pay an additional $25 deposit after they have been notified of their acceptance. This deposit may be refunded if an applicant cancels his/her application prior to twenty days before registration. The deposit will be credited toward matriculation fees at the time the student enrolls.

A seventy-five dollar ($75) residence hall deposit must be submitted with the student housing contract. The deposit, less any charges which may accrue due to damage, improper check-out, etc., will be refunded after the termination of the final housing contract.

REFUND OF FEES

Students who formally withdraw from the University prior to passing the 60% point in time during the term are eligible for a partial refund of fees. Refunds are made only when a student completely withdraws from the University, and no refunds are made when a student of his or her own volition reduces the course load after the add/drop period. Students may receive a refund resulting from a reduction of their course load during the add/drop period. No refunds for withdrawals will be made after passing the 60% point in time during the semester. It is the student's responsibility to withdraw officially in accordance with University regulations.

Forms for withdrawal from the University are available in the Counseling Services Office located in the Administration Building. A refund of tuition and fees, in accordance with federal, state, and institutional policies, will be issued within 30 days of receipt of completed withdrawal forms by the Business Office.

Students who formally withdraw from the institution on or before the first day of class are entitled to a refund of 100% of the tuition and fees paid for that period of enrollment. (First day of class is defined as "classes begin" date published in the GSW Bulletin.)

Students who formally withdraw from the institution after the first day of class but before the 60% point in time during the term are subject to guidelines established by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. This policy states:

The refund amount for students withdrawing from the institution shall be based on a pro rata percentage determined by dividing the number of calendar days in the semester that the student completed by the total calendar days in the semester. The total calendar days in a semester includes weekends, but excludes scheduled breaks of five or more days and days that a student was on an approved leave of absence. The unearned portion shall be refunded up to the point in time that the amount equals 60%.
Students that withdraw from the institution when the calculated percentage of completion is greater than 60%, are not entitled to a refund of any portion of institutional charges.
A refund of all matriculation fees, and other mandatory fees shall be made in the event of the death of a student at any time during the academic session. (BR Minutes, 1979-80, p.61; 1986-87 pp. 24-25; 1995, p.246)

The University is required to determine how much student financial aid was earned by students who withdraw during the term. If students have 'unearned aid' because they were disbursed more than they earned, it may be necessary for the unearned portion to be returned to the appropriate student financial aid fund. If the students have 'earned aid' that they have not received, they may be eligible to receive those funds.

TEXTBOOKS AND SUPPLIES

Textbooks and school supplies, as well as other student needs, are available in the Campus Bookstore. The cost of books and supplies will vary with the courses selected by the individual student. A fair estimate of this cost is from $250 to $450 per semester.

Refunds for textbooks will not be given without the following:

a. Cash register receipt dated within current term.
b. Valid student I.D.

AUDIT (NON-CREDIT) FEE

Fees for attending class on an audit or non-credit basis are calculated on the same schedule as regular academic fees.

OTHER FEES AND CHARGES

LATE REGISTRATION FEE:

Failure to register on specified date   
Undergraduate (non-refundable)   $22.50
Graduate (non-refundable)   $22.50

RETURNED CHECK FEE:

For each check   $15.00
OR 5 percent of the face amount of the check, whichever is greater.   

TRANSCRIPT FEE:

Initial Request (One Copy)   No Charge
Each Request Thereafter   $2.00

GRADUATION FEE:

Associate Degree   $30.00
Bachelor's Degree   $30.00
Master's Degree   $50.00
Specialist Degree   $50.00

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS AS RESIDENTS AND NON-RESIDENTS

A student is responsible for registering under the proper residency classification. A student classified as a non-resident who believes that he/she is entitled to be reclassified as a legal resident may petition the Registrar for a change of status. The petition must be filed no later than ten (10) days before the term begins in order for the student to be considered for reclassification for that term. If the petition is granted, reclassification will not be retroactive to prior terms. The necessary forms for this purpose are available in the Registrar’s Office and on RAIN.

To register as a legal resident of Georgia at an institution of the University System, a student must establish the following facts to the satisfaction of the Registrar:

  1. 1.  If a person is 18 years of age or older, he or she may register as an in-state student only upon showing that he or she has been a legal resident of Georgia for a period of at least 12 months immediately preceding the date of registration.
    Exceptions:
    1. A student whose parent, spouse, or court-appointed guardian is a legal resident of the State of Georgia may register as a resident providing the parent, spouse, or guardian can provide proof of legal residency in the State of Georgia for at least 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the date of registration.
    2. A student who previously held residency status in the State of Georgia but moved from the state and then returned to the state in 12 or fewer months.
    3. Students who are transferred to Georgia by employer are not subject to the durational residency requirement.
    2. . No emancipated minor or other person 18 years of age or older shall be deemed to have gained or acquired in-state status for tuition purposes while attending any educational institution in this state, in the absence of a clear demonstration that he or she in fact established legal residence in this state.
  2. If a parent or legal guardian of a student changes his or her legal residence to another state following a period of legal residence in Georgia, the student may retain his or her classification as an in-state student as long as he or she remains continuously enrolled in the University System of Georgia, regardless of the status of his or her parent or legal guardian.
  3. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed by a court as guardian of a nonresident minor, such minor will be permitted to register as a in-state student providing the guardian can provide proof that he or she has been a resident of Georgia ofr the period of 12 months immediately preceding the date of the court appointment.
  4. Aliens shall be classified as nonresident students, provided, however, that an alien who is living in this country under an immigration document permitting indefinite or permanent residence shall have the same privilege of qualifying for in-state tuition as a citizen of the United States.

OUT-OF-STATE TUITION WAIVERS

An institution may waive out-of-state tuition and assess in-state tuition for:

  1. Academic Common Market. Students selected to participate in a program offered through the Academic Common Market.
  2. International and Superior Out-of-State Students. International students and superior out-of-state students selected by the institutional president or an authorized representative, provided that the number of such waivers in effect does not exceed 2% of the equivalent full-time students enrolled at the institution in the fall term immediately preceding the term for which the out-of-state tuition is to be waived.
  3. University System Employees and Dependents. Full-time employees of the University System, their spouses, and their dependent children.
  4. Medical/Dental Students and Interns. Medical and dental residents and medical and dental interns at the Medical College of Georgia (BR Minutes, 1986-87, p. 340).
  5. Full-Time School Employees. Full-time employees in the public schools of Georgia or of the Department of Technical and Adult Education, their spouses, and their dependent children. Teachers employed full-time on military bases in Georgia shall also qualify for this waiver (BR Minutes, 1988-89, p.43).
  6. Career Consular Officials. Career consular officers, their spouses, and their dependent children who are citizens of the foreign nation that their consular office represents and who are stationed and living in Georgia under orders of their respective governments.
  7. Military Personnel. Military personnel, their spouses, and their dependent children stationed in Georgia and on active duty, unless such military personnel are assigned as students to System institutions for educational purposes. The waiver can be retained by military personnel, their spouses, and their dependent children if the military sponsor is reassigned outside of Georgia, as long as the student(s) remain(s) continuously enrolled and the military sponsor remains on active military status (BR Minutes, May 2003).
  8. Research University Graduate Students. Graduate students attending the University of Georgia, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia State University, and the Medical College of Georgia, which shall be authorized to waive the out-of-state tuition differential for a limited number of graduate students each year, with the understanding that the number of students at each of these institutions to whom such waivers are granted shall not exceed the number assigned below at any point in time:
    University of Georgia - 80
    Georgia Institute of Technology - 60
    Georgia State University - 80
    Medical College of Georgia - 20
  9. Border County Residents. Residents of an out-of-state county bordering a Georgia county in which the reporting institution or a Board-approved external center of the University System is located.
  10. National Guard Members. Full-time members of the Georgia National Guard, their spouses, and their dependent children (BR Minutes, April, 1998, pp.16-17).
  11. Students enrolled in University System institutions as part of Competitive Economic Development Projects. Students who are certified by the Commissioner of the Georgia Department of Industry, Trade & Tourism as being part of a competitive economic development project.
  12. Students in Georgia-Based Corporations. Students who are employees of Georgia-based corporations or organizations that have contracted with the Board of Regents through University System institutions to provide out-of-state tuition differential waivers.
  13. Students in Pilot Programs. Students enrolled in special pilot programs approved by the Chancellor. The Chancellor shall evaluate institutional requests for such programs in light of good public policy and the best interest of students. If a pilot program is successful, the tuition program shall be presented to the Board for consideration.
  14. Students in ICAPP® Advantage programs. Any student participating in an ICAPP® Advantage program.
  15. Direct Exchange Program Students. Any international student who enrolls in a University System institution as a participant in a direct exchange program that provides reciprocal benefits to University System students.
  16. Families Moving to Georgia. A dependent student who, as of the first day of term of enrollment, can provide documentation supporting that his or her supporting parent or court-appointed guardian has accepted full-time, self-sustaining employment and established domicile in the State of Georgia for reasons other than gaining the benefit of favorable tuition rates may qualify immediately for an out-of-state tuition differential waiver which will expire 12 months from the date the waiver was granted. An affected student may petition for residency status according to established procedures at the institution.
  17. Recently Separated Military Service Personnel. Members of a uniformed military service of the United States who, within 12 months of separation from such service, enroll in a program for teacher certification and demonstrate an intent to become a permanent resident of Georgia. This waiver may be granted for not more than one year.

FINANCIAL AID TO STUDENTS

The University provides a variety of programs to assist students who have financial need. Scholarships, grants, loans, and part-time work constitute the types of financial aid. It is preferable that financial aid applications for the next academic year be filed by April 1. Detailed information and appropriate forms may be secured by writing to the Financial Aid Office, Georgia Southwestern State University. All awards are contingent on funds being available.

Most types of financial aid are awarded on the basis of a student's academic progress and proven financial need. As used in relation to financial aid, the term financial need means the monetary difference between the total cost of attending the University and the computed amount of financial resources which the student and the family can contribute toward the total cost. The total cost of attending the University include tuition and all fees, room and board, books and supplies, personal expenses, and allowable transportation costs.

Financial need is computed by a standard need analysis system using confidential information submitted by the parents or the independent student. The need analysis system used by Georgia Southwestern State University is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) administered by the Federal Government. The analysis of a family's financial resources includes consideration of current family income, assets, family size, and number in college. Federal aid programs, state aid programs and many college programs do not permit aid awards that exceed the computed financial need. Thus, the information on all sources of aid must be provided to the Financial Aid Director. The amount of a student's computed financial need is the total cost of attending Georgia Southwestern State University minus the computed family resources.

Each applicant for the Federal Pell Grant, Federal Work Study Program, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program, Federal Perkins Loan, Regents' Opportunity Scholarship Program, and the Stafford Loan is required to provide an analysis of the family income using the FAFSA mentioned above. These forms are available from many secondary school counselors or from the Financial Aid Office at Georgia Southwestern State University. The completed FAFSA must be sent to the address on the form. Students should remember to list Georgia Southwestern State University, Americus, Georgia (GSW code 001573), as one of the institutions to receive a copy of the FAFSA.

Procedures For Applying For Financial Aid

Students should complete financial aid applications as soon as possible after January 1. Application for financial aid at Georgia Southwestern State University includes the following steps:

1. Make application for admission to the University. Applicants for financial aid need not be accepted for enrollment before an award is packaged but must be accepted in an eligible academic program before aid is disbursed. Transfer students from other colleges must have a transcript and an admissions application on file at the time of application for financial assistance.

2. Complete the FAFSA either on-line (www.fafsa.ed.gov) or in paper form, list GSW Code 001573, and send the completed application to the address on the form, for processing. The paper application for financial aid is available from high school counselors and from the Financial Aid Office, Georgia Southwestern State University. The application for financial aid also serves as the application for the Federal Pell Grant. The information provided on the application for financial aid is used to calculate the eligibility index number for the Federal Pell Grant.

3. If the institution code number is entered on the FAFSA, the institution will receive the student's financial information electronically. Until this information is received by the institution electronically, the student's file cannot be processed.

Financial aid is not automatically renewed. Continuing students must reapply for financial aid each year, as soon after January 1 as possible. All application information received after April 1 will be processed, but awards will be made as funds permit.

GRANTS

Grants are monetary gifts which are awarded to the students who have financial need and have maintained satisfactory progress toward earning a degree.

Federal Pell Grant

The Federal Pell Grant is an aid program designed to provide financial assistance to those who have established need and who are enrolled in an eligible undergraduate program. It is designed to be the floor of the financial aid award and should meet approximately one-half of the student's need. The amount of the Federal Pell Grant is determined on the basis of the family's resources and the cost of the University. The amount of a grant is based on the family contribution and two factors: (1) the amount of funds actually available for the program for the current year; and (2) the educational cost. The amount of the grant would decrease as the family contribution increases.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG)

This program has the single purpose of making a college education available to high school graduates of exceptional financial need who, without the grant, would be unable to attend University. Recipient must be Pell eligible.

Grants ranging from $200 to $600 are available to students for each of the four years of undergraduate study as long as funds are available.

Leveraging Education Assistance Partnership (LEAP)

A state grant that requires the recipient to be a Georgia resident, Pell eligible, and have at least $2000 worth of remaining need. Available for 8 full time semesters or 96 attempted hours.

LOANS

This type of financial aid and any corresponding amount of accumulated interest must be repaid within a specific time period.

Larry and Jane Comer Music Loan Fund

The Larry and Jane Comer Music Loan Fund was established to support the development of the music program at Georgia Southwestern State University and to increase the opportunities for deserving music students to earn their musical education. The recipients of the loan will be required to maintain good academic standing at the University and to repay the loan beginning 90 days after the semester in which the loan was awarded.

Federal Perkins Loan (National Direct Student Loan)

The Perkins Loan (or NDSL) program allows a student with financial need to borrow up to $9000 during his/her undergraduate study. The maximum loan per semester at Georgia Southwestern is $1125 or the amount of need, whichever is less. The student must be enrolled on at least a half-time basis. No interest is charged while the student is in school. Repayment of the loan at 5 percent interest begins nine months after the student leaves school. The minimum monthly payment is $40 and the entire loan must be paid within a ten-year period.

Cancellation provisions are available to individuals who

1. teach in a public or non-profit school which has been designed as eligible by DOE as enrolling a high concentration of students from low income families;
2. teach handicapped children; or
3. serve as full-time staff members in a head start program;
4. work as a nurse in a public or non-profit organization.

Jackson Loan Fund

The primary purpose of this money is to provide an individual with a temporary/short term emergency source of funding. The full amount of the loan and interest must be repaid by midterm of each semester. Students desiring this aid should schedule a conference with a Financial Aid Counselor at Georgia Southwestern State University prior to registration day.

Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan

The Stafford Subsidized Loan is a low-interest, need-based loan authorized by the federal and state governments to help students pay the costs of education beyond high school. Loans to students are made primarily by commercial lending institutions whose participation in the program is voluntary and not required by law. Repayment of any Stafford Loan that is obtained, within the limits of the law, will be "guaranteed" to the lender on the student's behalf by the guarantee agency. The actual amount available to the borrower is based upon financial need (as calculated by the FAFSA) which is not filled by other types of financial aid. This loan must be repaid by the student.

Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan

The Unsubsidized Loan has the same terms and situations as the Stafford Loan, except the borrower is responsible for the interest that accrues during deferment periods (not need-based). The program is open to students who may not qualify for the subsidized Federal Stafford Loan. The student may have a combination of subsidized and unsubsidized, but the combined total cannot exceed the program maximum. Check with the Financial Aid Counselor for further details. This loan must be repaid by the student.

Federal Plus Loans

Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS Loan) is an educational loan for eligible students, authorized by federal and state government to help parents and students pay the costs of education beyond high school. This loan is not based on financial need as calculated by the FAFSA. Repayment begins when the loan is disbursed. Minimum payments are $50 per month. Please see a Financial Aid Counselor for details. This loan must be repaid by the parent.

SCHOLARSHIPS

Scholarships are monetary gifts which usually do not require repayment. They are awarded on the basis of academic performance and other specific criteria stipulated by the agency or person(s) funding the scholarship. The amount of the awards may vary according to the established need of the scholarship recipient. In order to remain eligible to receive most academic scholarships, a student recipient must be enrolled for at least 12 credit hours each term, earn a 3.0 cumulative grade point, and remain in good judicial standing.

HOPE Scholarship - Undergraduate

To be eligible for a HOPE Scholarship, the student must

1. Be a Georgia resident.
2. Earn a B average (3.0) in high school College Prep track; 3.2 average in other track.
3. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
4. Must have attempted 30 semester hours with 3.0 GPA if high school graduation date is prior to 1993.

A transfer student who feels he or she is eligible for the HOPE Scholarship must request such consideration from the Financial Aid Office. The determination of eligibility is based on a review of all academic transcripts. It is the student's responsibility to make certain all academic transcripts have been received by the Office of Admissions before a request is made to the Financial Aid Office.

Once a student has lost HOPE eligibility, there is one chance to re-enter the HOPE Program. If that student falls below a 3.0 grade point average after attempting 30 hours and regains 3.0 at his/her own expense, at the end of the sophomore year (60 hours), the student would be given a second chance to receive the HOPE scholarship. A third chance is earned after the 90th attempted hour. At all times, a student must be making satisfactory academic progress (SAP) by Federal standards.

HOPE Promise Teacher Scholarship - Undergraduate

To be eligible for a HOPE Promise Teacher Scholarship, the student must

1. Be a Georgia resident.
2. Be enrolled in a teacher education program to pursue a baccalaureate degree.
3. Have a 3.6 or higher GPA.
4. Have attempted between 60 to 90 hours.
5. Commit to teach/serve in Georgia public school to repay scholarship.

HOPE Teacher Scholarship (Graduate)

To be eligible for a HOPE Teacher Scholarship, the student must:

1. Be a Georgia resident.
2. Be enrolled in a graduate program in a critical field.
3. Commit to teach/serve in his or her critical field in a Georgia public school to repay scholarship.

Critical Fields include the following (subject to change):

  • Middle Grade Education (Grades 4-8) with primary concentration in one of the following:
  • Math
  • Science
  • Math and Science
  • Mathematic Education (Grades 7-12)
  • Education of Exceptional Children (Grades P-12)
    • Behavioral Disorder
    • Interrelated Special Education
  • Foreign Language Education (Grades P-12)
    • French
    • Spanish
  • Business Education (Grades 7-12)
  • Industrial Arts/Technology Education (Grades 7-12)
  • Trade and Industrial Education (Grades 7-12)
  • Agriculture Education (Grades 7-12)
  • Science Education (Grades 7-12)
    • Broad Field Science
    • Biology
    • Chemistry
    • Earth/Space
    • Physics

Regents' Opportunity Scholarship

A limited number of Regents' Opportunity Scholarships will be given to graduate students who show need. Generally, only two recipients per year will benefit from the scholarship. A letter of application must be sent to the Director of Financial Aid and a completed FAFSA must be on file.

ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS

A limited number of academic scholarships are available at Georgia Southwestern State University. Awards are on a competitive basis and are generally awarded to entering students. Students who have a 3.0 high school average and who have a combined SAT score above 1000 are eligible to apply for the J.C. Roney Scholarships, the Alumni Scholarships, and the Wheatley Scholarships.

J.C. Roney Scholarships

Scholarships are awarded from the J.C. Roney Fund to first or second honor graduates, National Merit Semifinalists, and STAR students. These are awarded on a competitive basis. Applications should be made prior to February 15.

GSW Alumni Scholarships

The GSW Alumni Scholarships include the GSW Alumni Academic Scholarship, the Cavendar-Rich Scholarship, the E.R. Hogg Scholarship, the Mary Lou Jordan Scholarship, the Myra Lunsford Scholarship, the Alice K. Mathis Scholarship, the Henry King Scholarship, the Peggy A. Smith Tucker Scholarship, the Martha Hudson Westbrook Scholarship, and the GSW Alumni Athletic Scholarship.

Charles H. Wheatley Scholarships

Scholarships are awarded to high school honor graduates, National Merit Scholars, and students with 1100 SAT and 3.0 or above high school grade point averages. Wheatley Scholarships are also awarded to continuing GSW students and to transfer students who have earned an associate degree. Contact the Office of Financial Aid or the Office of Admission for additional information.

Additional Academic Scholarships

Other academic scholarships available at Georgia Southwestern State University include the Daniel D. Arden Scholarship for Geology students, the Iris Stewart Argo Scholarship for English majors, the James G. Deriso Scholarship for Business students, the J.H. Dorminy Music Scholarship for Music students, the Frances Bagley Jones Scholarship for students from Sumter County, Georgia, the Peterson Scholarship for Science students, the Robert Marshall Pryor Scholarship for residents of Sumter County, the L.R. Towson Scholarship for Chemistry majors, the Randy & JoAnna Williams Scholarship for Developmental Studies, the Biology Club Scholarship, the Chemistry Club Scholarship, the Delta Kappa Gamma Scholarship,  the Tammy Lee Fortner Scholarship, the Julia Baker Isakson Scholarship, the Frances Wynn Patrick Scholarship for Nursing, the John Monroe Prance Scholarship, the John Emory Rylander Scholarship for Nursing, the Lula F. Stephens Scholarship, the Jenny Harrison Strange Scholarship, the Roy Lee and Susan Smith Free Enterprise Scholarship, the Wheatley Community University Fellowships, the Wheatley Continuing Student Scholarships, the Wheatley Leadership Scholarship, the Watson Scholarship, the Weston Scholarship, the Dudley Voice Scholarship, the Cooper Lighting Scholarship, and the Joan Smith Scholarship. For more information, contact the Financial Aid Office.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Several types of part-time employment are available through Georgia Southwestern State University.

Federal Work Study

Work Study employment, a federally funded program, is available to students with established financial need (based upon the application for Financial Aid) at the time of their initial enrollment or thereafter. Family income is the primary basis for determining eligibility. Satisfactory academic progress and work performance are required.

Under present arrangements, a student may work a maximum of 20 hours per week during the regular semester. Since the student earns this amount by working, it is not repaid.

Work Aid

Work Aid, a locally funded program of part-time employment, is available on a limited basis. Students are selected for these positions on the basis of skills in certain areas as well as need. Students should report to the Career Services Office for applications.

The rate of pay is minimum wage and payment is by check each month.

Graduate Assistantships

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available in some departments. Interested students should contact the Director of Graduate Studies or the appropriate school or office. For additional information, see the section on Graduate Studies.

Part-Time Employment

The Career Services Office maintains a list of jobs available in the community. Any student interested in part-time work should file an application.

OTHER SOURCES OF FINANCIAL AID

The Pickett and Hatcher Educational Fund

This fund provides loans at a reasonable rate to students in need of financial assistance to attend college. Apply directly to Pickett and Hatcher Educational Fund, Post Office Box 1238, Columbus, Georgia.

The Ty Cobb Educational Foundation Scholarship

This scholarship is available to single residents of the state of Georgia who have completed the freshman year of college with high academic standing (at least 3.3 GPA). Address inquiries to the Ty Cobb Foundation, P.O. Box 725, Forest Park, Georgia 30051. The deadline for applications is May 1.

Financial Aid Policies

Georgia Southwestern State University administers its financial aid program in compliance with all applicable Federal and State laws and regulations. Specifically, the financial aid policies are listed below:

1. To receive any Federal financial aid, a student must maintain satisfactory progress toward a degree as determined by Federal standards. Among other requirements, Federal standards generally define "satisfactory progress toward graduation" as passing 67% of all academic work attempted during an academic year. For students who fail to meet these standards, their financial aid will be terminated. They will not be eligible to receive further aid until such time they have corrected the deficiency at their own expense.
2. To receive Federal aid, the student must not owe a refund on previous Federal grants or be in default on a Federal student loan.
3. When the student is eligible for a Federal Pell Grant, the financial aid package is built around this grant. If the student is eligible for the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), this grant is added next. Loans and/or employment are added in an attempt to fill the remaining need.
4. Refunds are made in accordance with the schedule in the current University Bulletin. Any refund from a Federal source will be returned to that fund in the appropriate order.

More information on financial aid may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office, Room 207, Sanford Hall. Office hours are from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Summer hours may vary. Please call 229-928-1378 to determine schedule for summer hours.

VETERANS' BENEFITS

Georgia Southwestern State University is approved for the educational training of veterans and certain eligible spouses and dependents of veterans. The institution serves only as a source of certification and information to the Veterans Administration as all financial transactions and eligibility determinations are handled directly between the student and the VA. Veterans and other eligible persons interested in obtaining educational benefits must meet all applicable requirements for admission as outlined in this bulletin. After being officially admitted to the University, the veteran or eligible person should contact the Veteran Certifying Official in the Registrar's Office for information concerning application procedures and educational benefits. Additional information about eligibility may be obtained by calling the Department of Veteran Affairs at 1-800- 827-1000.

 

CAMPUS SERVICES

LIBRARY SERVICES

The James Earl Carter Library was completed in 1971 and named in honor of President Jimmy Carter's father. It contains over 190,000 volumes and currently subscribes to 567 journals. As a selective United States Government Depository, the Library houses over 300,000 federal government publications in various formats. The library also has a small multimedia collection (LPs, video tapes, audio-tapes, CDs, and software). Special collections include the Dr. Harold Isaacs Third World Studies collection, ERIC collection, rare books, newspapers, and popular reading materials.

Through our participation in GALILEO (Georgia Library Learning Online), the Library provides access to over 200 databases. The Library's online catalog is part of the state-wide integrated online system, GIL (Galileo Interconnected Libraries). GIL provides a web-based interface with a standardized search format. The Library is a charter member of SOLINET (Southeastern Library Network) which was created to increase the availability of bibliographic resources through the use of electronic data processing and communications. More than 30 million books and other materials can be accessed through this network which the Library fully utilizes for cataloging and its ILL (Interlibrary Loan) system.

The Library seats over 600 and provides individual and group study areas. The Library's computer lab has 20 state-of-the-art work stations. Audiovisual equipment and facilities include microfilm and microfiche reader-printers, copying machines, an individual viewing/listening room, and head phones, tape-recorder, and a CD player which can be checked out for in-house use.

The Library offers many services including Interlibrary Loan, reserves, bibliographic instruction, and reference assistance. The Library offers a for-credit course, LIBR 1000, and participates in UNIV 1000, the University's orientation course, and provides group and individual library instruction, tutorials, and demonstrations upon request.

The Library's electronic services include email submission of ILL, renewal, hold requests, reference inquiries, and an online suggestion box.

Further information about the Library, its collections, services, and staff can be found on the Library's website:http://www.gsw.edu/~library.

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

The Student Support Services Program is a federally funded program designed to (1) improve the retention and graduation rates of students, (2) provide academic support services necessary for program participants to maintain good academic standing, (3) provide supplementary activities for program students that will enhance their personal development, (4) assist them toward the realization of their educational goals, and (5) foster an institutional climate supportive of the success of low-income and first generation college students and individuals with disabilities. The program provides in-depth academic and personal counseling; career development; tutoring; personal assistance with study skills development; cultural activities, special focus on incoming freshman, transfer students, and returning adult students; and individualized accommodation services for learning disabled/handicapped students. Tutoring is free of charge to Student Support Services participants. It is mandatory for participants on academic warning or probation.

UPWARD BOUND PROGRAM

Upward Bound is a program for select high school students who have demonstrated potential for post secondary education. Participation is limited to students of Sumter, Crisp, Marion, Schley and Webster Counties of Georgia. Components of the program include the following:

Academic Year: Saturday sessions designed to assist students with basic skills instruction, standardized testing, study skills, counseling, career and cultural activities.

Summer Residential Program: Housing and classes on GSW campus for six weeks with emphasis on academic skills, personal and career awareness.

Intensive Experience: Stress is placed on reading, writing, science, mathematics, computer science, study skills, foreign language, speech and drama, art, sporting activities, and cultural/recreational activities.

Bridge Year for Graduating Seniors: Assistance with standardized tests, study skills, admissions selection, financial aid process, college search trips, and college enrollment.

MULTICULTURAL AND MINORITY AFFAIRS

The Office of Multicultural & Minority Affairs (OMMA) is committed to assisting in the overall development of minority students at Georgia Southwestern State University. OMMA is the liaison between international and minority students and the university community at-large and provides an environment which offers support services to foster student learning, encouragement, and support.

As society becomes more culturally and ethnically diverse, it is our goal to challenge students to positively grow with these changes by promoting the idea of cultural pluralism and its effects on all people. In addition, it is our objective, through cross cultural exchange and interaction, to enhance student life by diminishing acts of intolerance and ignorance.

CAREER SERVICES

Planning for a future career in an important fact of every student's day-to-day college experience. Career Services provides a wide range of services for students throughout their years at Georgia Southwestern State University including

  • Career Counseling
  • Employment Counseling
  • Classroom seminars on resume writing and interviewing
  • Regional and statewide Career Fairs
  • Career Resource Lab, utilizing computer technology
  • Current employer information and employment opportunities via Internet
  • GeorgiaHire and NACELINK
  • Listing of local part-time job opportunities for students
  • Operation of JLD (Job Location Development)

Career Counseling is available to help students discover satisfactory solutions to academic and career concerns. This process is assisted by the use of various personality and interest inventories. Employment counseling aids students with resume development, interviewing skills and the job search process.

The Career Resource Lab provides students with a centralized location to explore specific career and occupational information, including educational requirements, potential employers, work environments, opportunities for advancement and a financial outlook. Information about professional programs and graduate schools is also available.

COUNSELING SERVICES

The goal of personal counseling is to help students discover satisfactory alternatives to social, academic, and personal concerns, including substance abuse and other health related issues. Counseling sessions take place in a private office and confidentiality is respected. When another person, office, community agency or medical professional can provide better information or assistance, the counselor will make referrals and help the student make an appointment. Counselors are available through the Office of Student Life, the Counseling Services Office, the Financial Aid Office, the Academic Skills Center, the Student Support Services Program, and the Residence Halls.

THE ROSALYNN CARTER INSTITUTE FOR HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

The Rosalynn Carter Institute (RCI) was established in 1987 on the campus of Georgia Southwestern State University. The RCI was formed in honor of former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, an alumna of Georgia Southwestern, to enhance her long-standing commitments to human development and mental health. The RCI facilitates collaborative relationships among citizen consumers, community human service providers, faculty and students to achieve shared goals.

The Rosalynn Carter Institute for Human Development was formed in honor of First Lady Rosalynn Carter in 1987. Through research, education, and training, the RCI promotes the mental health and well-being of individuals, families, and professional caregivers; promulgates effective caregiving practices; builds public awareness of caregiving needs; and advances public and social policies that enhance caring communities.

The caregiving mission of the Institute is implemented through two major projects. The West Central Georgia Caregivers' Network (CARE-NET) assists informal and formal caregivers in a 16-county region. A second project, the National Quality Caregiving Coalition (NQCC), brings together associations and organizations in America that wish to improve the caregiving process.

The RCI provides clinical training, research, and public administration opportunities for students. The John and Betty Pope Fellowship Program provides financial assistance for students committed to study and work in the caregiving professions. The Pope Eminent Scholar on campus offers students and faculty the opportunity to work with a professional who is nationally recognized in the caregiving field. Conferences and workshops offer students an opportunity to learn from nationally recognized figures in the human development and mental health fields.

For more information, email the Rosalynn Carter Institute at rci@rci.gsw.edu  or access the RCI homepage athttp://www.rosalynncarter.org

ORIENTATION PROGRAM

Prior to the beginning of the student's first semester at Georgia Southwestern, the new student participates in an orientation program. The GSW O'Team, a specially selected and trained group of undergraduate students, and UNIV 1000 instructors, design an orientation program which makes transition into college life at GSW easier and more enjoyable. Areas given special attention include academic advisement and class schedule planning, University services and facilities, academic policies and procedures, rights and responsibilities of students, issues about which students need to make personal choices, skills necessary for academic success, and opportunities for involvement in student activities. Such topics are explored in more depth in UNIV 1000, The GSW Experience, a 1 semester hour course requirement of all first-time entering students.

New students will be notified well in advance of the date and time for orientation for the semester in which they plan to enroll. These sessions provide opportunities for them to meet GSW faculty and administrators as well as to become familiar with University policies and to ask any questions they may have about the University.

STUDENT LOCATOR SERVICE

In emergency situations, students may be located by calling the Office of Student Life at 229/928-1387 or the Public Safety Office at 229/928-1390 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays) or 229/931-2244 (nights and weekends). Communication with the students will be made from these offices. These offices will not provide directory information to non-GSW personnel.

HOUSING/RESIDENCE LIFE

Residence Life at Georgia Southwestern State University offers students the opportunity to meet new people and make life-long friends, to feel a sense of independence, yet belong to a community, and to be in close contact with people who have values, attitudes, desires, and academic interests different from their own. They will be challenged to question, to think, and to grow as individuals. Students living on campus are more involved in leadership roles than their off-campus peers, including Student Government, sororities and fraternities, campus honorary organizations, the Campus Activities Board, the Orientation Team, the Residence Hall Association, and Hosts and Marshals. Living on campus can be a real PLUS if the student wants to become involved in campus life.

There are four residence halls on the GSW campus ranging in size from less than 100 to approximately 275 students. The halls are staffed with professional and student staff members whose primary objective is to insure a comfortable, congenial, and secure place for students to live and learn.

HOUSING ELIGIBILITY AND REGULATION

GSW has the following on-campus living requirement: All full-time students under the age of 21, who have earned less than 60 semester hours are required to reside on campus unless they have lived on campus for four (4) full term semesters, they are married, have a dependent child, have a documented medical condition,  or they are living in the legal residence of a family member. For this purpose family member is defined as parent(s), guardian(s), grandparent(s), son/daughter, uncle/aunt, or brother/sister who is not a student at GSW.

In order to provide on campus housing at the lowest possible rate, the University operates its residence halls on a contract basis for the full Academic Year beginning with the Fall Semester and continuing through the end of Spring Semester. A separate contract is signed for the Summer Term. Since the ANNUAL HOUSING CONTRACT is a binding agreement between the student and the University, applicants are advised to read this document before signing.

Failure to submit the ANNUAL HOUSING CONTRACT will not cancel the obligation to live on campus. Students who wish to commute to campus from their legal residence or live with a family member who is not a GSW student may request an exemption from this policy by submitting the REQUEST FOR HOUSING EXEMPTION form available from the Office of Student Life.

CANCELLATIONS

(A) New and continuing applicants for campus housing who decide not to enroll at Georgia Southwestern must cancel their contract
in writing no later than thirty (30) working days prior to the first official day of classes for the affected term. Cancellation after this date will result in forfeiture of the deposit.

(B) Students who have signed contracts and will enroll at Georgia Southwestern may petition to cancel their contract by submitting the Request for Release petition (obtained in the Residence Life Office) to the Department of Residence Life, Georgia Southwestern State University, Americus, Georgia 31709 thrity (30) days prior to the beginning of the affected term. Notification submitted to other University offices will not insure requested action. Upon approval of housing cancellation, a contract buyout will be required.

CONTRACT BUY OUT

(A) A student who is obligated to the 2003-2004 contract may buy out the contract by paying an assessment of thirty percent (30%) of the value of the contract. Contract buyouts must be completed by 5:00 PM on the first official day of classes for the affected term. Detailed procedures that must be followed to buy out the contract are available at the Department of Residence Life.

(B) The student who buys out his/her contract will forfeit the housing deposit upon release from that contract.

DEPOSITS AND RENT PAYMENTS

(A) The $75.00 deposit must accompany the housing contract and is nontransferable to another person. The deposit is refunded according to the following conditions: 1) the University is unable to provide campus housing, 2) the terms of the contract are fulfilled, the student has been officially checked out of the room by a residence hall staff member, and the student is cleared of responsibility for damage to the room or building. The deposit will be forfeited, wholly or in part, when the student 1) is responsible for damage to the room or building, 2) fails to follow departmental check out procedures, 3) terminates the contract after the established deadlines or before the terms are completed, or 4) owes the University any debt, fine, or other obligation owed by the student.

(B) Housing fees are due and payable in advance at the prescribed rate per academic term. If payment is not made by the stipulated deadline, the student’s registration can be canceled.

REFUNDS

Students who officially withdraw from the University qualify for a prorated refund of room fees as determined by the date of the official checkout of the residence hall. Refunds will be prorated by the formula set by the Business Office. Students who vacate their assigned room during the semester without an official withdrawal or official residency release and students who withdraw and fail to officially check out of the room with the Residence Life Staff or students who are evicted for disciplinary reasons will receive no refund of either housing fees or deposit.

FOOD SERVICES

The dining service at GSW provides students with a quality and variety of food choices at an economical cost. A student who has earned less than 60 semester credit hours and who lives in a residence hall is required to purchase a meal plan. The three available meal plans, which include unlimited seconds, are 10 meals per week, 15 meals per week and 21 meals per week. Included with each meal plan is an additional dollar amount available on a declining balance for purchase of items in the Canes Den and/or any additional meals in the Dining Hall.

After purchasing a meal plan the student I.D. is used to gain entrance into the dining hall or the Canes Den, both located in the Marshall Student Center. The Canes Den features a Pizza Hut Express along with other fast food menu items.

Special diets can be provided if prescribed by a physician. The student should discuss any special needs with the food service director by calling 229-924-2732.

Commuting students are also invited to use the University dining service. Options include purchasing any of the available semester meal plans, applying dollars to a declining balance card for use in the Canes Den or Dining Hall, and, of course, purchases may be made with cash.

For any questions concerning the dining services offered at GSW please feel free to call the Food Service Director at 229-924-2732.

HEALTH SERVICES

Georgia Southwestern State University provides on campus health services at the Herschel A. Smith Health Center. The Health Center staff provides assistance to students with minor illnesses or injuries and promotes positive physical and mental health by providing health awareness information to students. A women’s comprehensive health program staffed by nurse practitioners and registered nurses is available by appointment every Wednesday of each month while the university is in session.

The Health Center staff includes a physician, a family nurse practitioner who serves as Director of the Health Center, and registered nurses. The Health Center hours are 8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Health Center services are available on a walk-in basis or by appointment during the daytime while classes are in session. Hours are subject to change to reflect the needs of the University. The Student Health Center is closed on university holidays and weekends. On weekends, students should notify the Residence Life staff member on duty or Public Safety for medical emergencies. If a student becomes ill, the Health Center will notify family members and faculty if the student so requests.

A student who utilizes Health Center medical services is expected to visit the Health Center at times that do not conflict with academic responsibilities. After a student has been assessed in the Health Center, we will provide a written recommendation to excuse from class only if we feel there is justification. By Georgia Southwestern State University policy, an excuse from class can only be granted by the professor of that class.

The semester health fee, paid by each student enrolled five or more hours, entitles the student to consultation services with the professional Health Center staff. All students are urged to have adequate health coverage for illnesses or emergency visits to the local hospital or a physician’s office when the Health Center is closed. Insurance coverage is also recommended for medical care that is not available at the Health Center, including treatment of major injuries, surgery, and hospitalization. Insurance brochures containing an enrollment form are available at the Health Center.

Laboratory and x-ray services, inpatient hospital services, hospital emergency room treatment, ambulance transportation to a hospital, and professional services of a non-university medical specialist are not included in the semester health service fee. The Health Center staff, however, will assist the student in making arrangement with medical specialist.

The University physician is available for student visits at the Health Center at designated hours. As a part of your visit to the Health Center, the physician/nurse practitioner can dispense prescription medication at discounted prices-antibiotics, allergy and cold medicines, ear and eye drops, dermatological creams, and more. Medications not stocked by the Health Center are the financial responsibility of the student for whom they are prescribed.

A student accepted for admission will receive a statement of Health form which is to completed and returned to the Director of the Health Center prior to enrollment in the University. Evidence of two MMR’s are required of students born after 1956. Evidence of one rubella vaccination is required of students born before 1957. International students should contact Asian Studies for additional requirements. It is recommended that each student discuss with his/her health care provider the need for additional immunizations such as, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, varicella, hepatitis B, and meningococcal vaccine.

OPTIONAL STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE

An optional sickness and accident insurance plan is available to students through a private company. Information and applications are available at the Health Center or in Auxiliary Services Office. Students are invited to investigate the program, especially those students who are not covered by any other health and accident insurance plan. For those students who participate in the optional health plan, all claims will be filed directly with the insurance company.

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

In order to help create an environment conducive to the furthering of educational pursuits and personal development, the University has established minimum behavioral expectations of students. These expectations, as well as student rights, are published in the Rights and Responsibilities section of the GSWeathervane. Also included in this publication is the University policy statement relative to implementation of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.

Each student is responsible for reading and observing the policies stated in the student handbook. The GSWeathervane is revised annually and is made available to students via the GSW website at  Student Handbook (Weathervane)

GEORGIA SOUTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY DRUG FREE CAMPUS POLICY

Georgia Southwestern State University is committed to support and comply with the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 (Public Law 101-226, Section 22, subpart B) as an Institution of Higher Education. The law under this act now covers both drugs and alcohol and relates to faculty, staff, and students. Therefore, the entire campus community of Georgia Southwestern State University is under the mandate to comply.

The Task Force on Alcohol and Other Drugs Committee is a committee appointed by the President of Georgia Southwestern State University.

The Task Force shall be generally concerned with alcohol and other drug education, prevention and intervention for the GSW student body. The Task Force shall:

  • provide continual guidance and support to ensure that the 1989 amendments (Part 86) to the "Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act" regulations are being followed.
  • develop a strategic plan for GSW on AOD issues. This plan will include the assignment of sub-committees to accomplish strategic plan tasks.
  • establish and monitor the Student Assistance Program to educate and provide interventions to students who violate current GSW alcohol and other drug policies.
  • provide financial support for GSW education and prevention programs.
  • forward any recommendations or modifications in any current GSW drug/alcohol policies to the President.

To achieve the maximum benefit under this program, Georgia Southwestern State University expects faculty, staff, and students to meet appropriate standards of performance, to observe basic rules of good conduct, to comply with Institutional personnel policies and procedures as contained in the Personnel Policy Manual, the Faculty Handbook (as amended), and the GSWeathervane: A Student Handbook (as amended).

As an institution of higher education, the primary focus of the University is on the health and safety of all faculty, staff, and students. It is well substantiated that the health risks in using illicit drugs and abusing alcohol are enormous to the individual, as well as devastating to family, friends, and the community.

Georgia Southwestern provides a confidential counseling and referral program and encourages faculty, staff, and students who feel they have a potential alcohol or other drug-related problem to utilize these services. An important part of this program includes the Student Assistant Program (SAP) which is a coordinated effort by the Office of Student Life, Counseling Center, and the Task Force on Alcohol and Other Drugs.

In the discharge of its responsibilities as an employer and an institution of higher education, Georgia Southwestern State University aggressively promotes and requires a drug free campus among its faculty, staff, and student body. The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of illegal drugs or alcohol by Georgia Southwestern State University employees and students is prohibited by Institutional policy. Violations of this policy, including felony and/or misdemeanor drug or alcohol convictions during the course of employment or enrollment in any academic program at Georgia Southwestern State University, may result in appropriate disciplinary penalties being imposed by the University, up to and including termination of employment or expulsion and referral for prosecution.

This policy shall be communicated to new faculty by appropriate Department Chairs, to classified staff by the Director of Human Resources, to all new entering students and all other students by the Vice President for Student Affairs. Each contractor engaged in the performance of Federal contract or grant will be provided with a copy of this policy. The institutional Personnel Policy Manual, Faculty Handbook, and GSWeathervane are amended to incorporate this policy.

STUDENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (SAP)

The "On Campus Talking about Alcohol" (OCTAA) curriculum serves as the educational portion of the SAP. OCTAA is designed to help students and professionals understand the Lifestyle Risk Model for alcohol/drug prevention and intervention. The risk reduction information is sequential, which makes it essential to attend the entire program.

The curriculum is presented in three two-hour sessions. OCTAA is required for those found guilty of violating GSW alcohol and other drug policies. Further sanctions may be applied if the governing bodies believe it is necessary based on the circumstances. The program is also available for any individual seeking help for alcohol or other drug issues. If a student who is mandated to attend OCTAA fails to attend ALL sessions of OCTAA, a hold will be placed upon their record, making them ineligible to register for classes the following term.

First offense: The student will be sent a letter stating that he/she is required to sign up for and successfully complete the OCTAA program at the next available offering. The Student will sign up for the OCTAA program through the Continuing Education Center and will be required to pay a $35 fee for the program. Successful completion of OCTAA requires a knowledge test score of 75 percent or above. The exam will be given at the completion of the OCTAA sessions. In addition, the student may be required to provide up to 40 hours of community service to the campus and/or may be suspended from the residence hall for a minimum of one semester. This will be determined through the Office of Student Life. Upon completion of OCTAA, the student is required to conduct a SAP exit interview through Counseling Services before the student will receive a certificate of completion. This signifies that the student has successfully completed all steps of the SAP.

Second offense: The student will be subject to the following action. This will include an appointment with Counseling Services. The student will be required to sign up for and successfully complete the OCTAA program at the next available offering. The Student will sign up for the OCTAA program through the Continuing Education Center and will be required to pay a $35 fee for the program. A clinical assessment may be necessary to determine if addiction counseling or other treatments should be recommended. In addition, the student may be required to provide 40 hours of community service to the campus and/or may be suspended from the residence hall for a minimum of one semester. This will be determined through the Office of Student Life. Upon completion of OCTAA, the student is required to conduct a SAP exit interview through Counseling Services before the student will receive a certificate of completion. This signifies that the student has successfully completed all steps of the SAP.

Third offense: The student will be suspended from school for a minimum of one semester. In addition, he or she will be referred to Alcohol/Drug addiction counseling such as Middle Flint Behavioral Services, for proper evaluation and must complete his or her addiction education program.
Only after showing completion of the educational program, may the student return to school.

POLICY STATEMENT ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT

(The following is compliance with Federal law and Board of Regents Policy)

It has always been our policy to maintain the best possible working environment for all faculty, staff, and students. All employees and students have the right to be free from sexual and all other forms of unlawful harassment of any kind in the workplace, including harassment because of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, disability, or any other characteristic protected by applicable federal, state or local law. GSW will not tolerate such harassment.

What is Sexual Harassment?

Sexual harassment is an unwelcome advance, request for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when....

1. submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or,
2. submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as a basis for employment decisions affecting that individual or,
3. such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual's work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.

Sexual Harassment can take many forms including:

o Remarks of a sexual nature concerning a person's body or clothing.
o Sexually explicit slurs or words which are used to describe a person.
o Unnecessary and unwelcome touching, patting, pinching or fondling.
o Unwelcome propositions or requests for social dates or sexual activity.
o The circulation or displaying of sexually oriented cartoons, pictures, or other potentially offensive materials while on campus.
o Remarks exchanged by two consenting adults that may be offensive to other individuals.

What should you do if you think you're being subjected to Sexual Harassment at Georgia Southwestern State University?

If you feel you are a victim of sexual harassment, you should bring your concerns to University's Affirmative Action Office or the Vice President of Student Affairs. The earlier the incident is reported, the sooner University officials can investigate concerns. Any complaint under this policy will be handled confidentially and fairly. No reprisal or retaliation will occur because of the report of an incident of sexual harassment. A formal grievance can also be filed when reporting an incident of sexual harassment.

POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Georgia Southwestern State University’s goal is to ensure equal access to all programs and makes reasonable accommodations for the needs of students with disabilities. Students should contact the Student Support Services office to request academic accommodations or address accessibility issues. Please note that it is the student’s responsibility to self-identify. Please visit the Student Support Services web page at:
Student Support Services  or call us at (229) 931-2294 for more information.

Faculty and staff are encouraged to direct all students inquiring about services for students with disabilities to the Student Support Services program, 1st floor, Sanford Hall.

SERVICES TO STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES

The Student Support Services Program is a federally funded program designed to (1) improve the retention and graduation rates of students, (2) provide academic support services necessary for program participants to maintain good academic standing, (3) provide supplementary activities for program students that will enhance their personal development, (4) assist them toward the realization of their educational goals, and (5) foster an institutional climate supportive of the success of low-income and first generation college students and individuals with disabilities.

The program provides in-depth academic and personal counseling, career development, tutoring, personal assistance with study skills development, cultural activities, special focus on incoming freshmen, transfer students, and returning adult students. Tutoring is free of charge to Student Support Services participants and is mandatory for participants on academic warning or probation. To complete an application or to obtain more information on the Student Support Services program, please visit the web page at:  Student Support Services

ADMINISTRATIVE MEDICAL WITHDRAWALS

For the provision of an academic learning environment and the protection of students and the total University community, the University has adopted a policy for the administrative medical withdrawal of students. A student may be administratively withdrawn from the University when, in the judgment of the Vice President for Student Affairs in consultation with the Director of Counseling Services, the University physician, the student's parents or spouse, the student's physician, and appropriate health professionals, it is determined that the student suffers from a physical, mental, emotional, or psychological health condition which (1) poses a significant danger or threat of physical harm to the student or to the person or property of others or (2) causes the student to interfere with the rights of other members of the University community or with the exercise of any proper activities or functions of the University or its personnel or (3) causes the student to be unable to meet institutional requirements for admission or continued enrollment, as defined in the Student Conduct Code and other publications of the University.

Except in emergency situations, a student shall, upon request, be accorded an appropriate hearing prior to the final decision concerning his or her continued enrollment at the University.

STUDENT LIFE

The Division of Student Affairs exists to plan, coordinate, and implement co-curricular programs and services which support students while they learn. The goal of the Division of Student Affairs is to identify non-academic needs of GSW students and to put its staff and resources to work in order to meet those needs. The staff of Student Affairs is particularly interested in fostering the development of the student as a whole person. Providing opportunities for students to interact effectively with each other and with faculty, to expand their leadership and communication skills, and to achieve their goals are the underlying objectives of the programs and services of the Division of Student Affairs.

Under the leadership of the Vice President for Student Affairs, the Division of Student Affairs includes counseling, career planning and placement, admissions, financial aid, judiciaries, Greek life, multicultural and minority affairs, orientation, residence life, student activities, intramural sports and recreation, and the student center. For complete information concerning these programs and services, see the GSWeathervane, which is made available to all students by the Division of Student Affairs.

STUDENT IDENTIFICATION CARDS

The student ID card is the official means of identification for currently enrolled students. GSW student identification cards are made during the registration process at the beginning of each term and also on a specific day each week throughout the semester. The date and time will be posted each semester. A student must present the ID card in order to receive services at the University and at the request of a University faculty or staff member. Each semester the student must have his/her card updated with a current validation label in the Office of Student Life. A $5.00 fee is charged for replacing a lost or stolen student ID card and is paid at the Business Office. A receipt must be presented to the Office of Student Life.

 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

THE SEMESTER SYSTEM

The academic year is divided into two semesters (terms) of 15 weeks each and a summer term. New courses are begun each semester; hence, it is possible for students to enter the University at the beginning of any term.

SEMESTER HOURS OF CREDIT

Credit in courses is expressed in semester hours. Normally, a semester hour of credit represents one class hour of work per week for one semester, or an equivalent amount of work in other forms of instruction such as laboratory, studio, or field work. Most of the courses offered by the University meet three times per week for one semester and therefore carry three semester hours of credit.

NUMBERING OF COURSES

Each academic course is designated by numerals. Courses are numbered according to the following plan:

Freshman and Sophomore 1000-2999
Junior and Senior   3000-4999
Graduate   5000-8999
Courses numbered 0001 to 0999 are institutional credit courses.   

STUDENT ACADEMIC LOAD

The normal course load for students is fifteen semester hours credit in academic subjects (five three-hour courses). A student is considered to be carrying a full load if enrolled for twelve or more semester hours of academic credit. A student is considered to be registered for an overload if enrolled in more than eighteen course credit hours.

A student must have the approval of the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs to register for an overload. The following cases usually qualify: (1) Students on the Dean's List or President's List for the preceding term may register for as much as twenty-one hours credit. (2) A student enrolled in certain curricula which require an overload for a given semester may register for the specified hours of credit.

PART-TIME STUDENTS

Students who are enrolled for less than a full load are classified as part-time students. These students may be working toward college degrees or they may be taking courses for self improvement. Part-time students are required to satisfy the minimum academic standards.

AUDIT

A student must have permission from the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs to audit a course. Auditors are expected to attend classes, but they are not required to take examinations or meet course requirements. No credit is given for audits. In the event of overloaded classes, students enrolled for credit will be given preference. Fees for attending class on an audit basis are calculated on the same schedule as regular academic fees.

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION

Credit by examination is offered for a number of courses at the University, e.g. CLEP and Advanced Placement. Credit by examination is listed as such on the transcript along with the course number, title, and hours of credit; however, no grade is assigned and the credit is not included in computing the grade point average. Credit by examination is limited to ten hours in a discipline and thirty hours in the University. Credit by examination is usually earned at the time the student enters the University. See the Registrar for more information.

GRADING SYSTEM AND QUALITY POINTS

GRADE   Achievement Quality   Points
A  Superior   4
B   Above Average   3
C   Average   2
D   Poor   1
F   Failing   0
P   Pass   0
S   Satisfactory Performance   0
U   Unsatisfactory Performance   0
V   Audit   0
I   Incomplete   0
IP   In Progress (used only for Learning Support)   0
K   Credit by Exam   0
W   Withdrawn   0
WF   Withdrawn Failing   0
WM   Withdrawn for Military Purposes   0
NR   No grade reported by instructor   0

A grade of "I" indicates that the student was doing satisfactory work but, for non-academic reasons beyond his/her control, was unable to meet the full requirements of the course during the term scheduled. The individual faculty member assigning the "I" has the responsibility for documenting the work to be completed. This documentation is to be filed with the Academic Dean or Department Chair at the time grades are submitted. An incomplete grade must be removed before the end of the following term (including summer term); otherwise, the grade will be recorded as F.

Students who for non-academic reasons stop attending class prior to midterm should withdraw from the course. A grade of "I" cannot be assigned in this situation.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE

The grade point average is the ratio of quality points earned to the number of credit hours for which the student is accountable. The grade point average will be calculated for each student at the end of each term and will be printed on the transcript as follows:

1. The Semester Grade Point Average is the ratio of quality points earned to credit hours attempted that semester in courses numbered 1000 or above.

2. The Cumulative/Institution Grade Point Average is the ratio of quality points earned to credit hours attempted in courses numbered 1000 or above for which a final grade has been earned. Normally, a course is counted only once for credit hours. For this type of course, the latest grade earned replaces all previous grades and determines the quality points assigned.

A grade of WF is treated as an F in calculating grade point averages.

POLICY ON REPEATING COURSES

Normally, a course is counted only one time for credit hours. If a student wants to repeat a course that falls into this category, he/she may do so with the understanding that the latest grade earned replaces all previous grades. The number of quality points awarded and credit hours earned is determined by this final grade.

CLASS RANK

Students are classified once each year, and class rank is based on semester hours of credit earned. Minimum semester hours of academic credit for the different class ranks are as follows:

  • Sophomore-30 hours
  • Junior-60 hours
  • Senior-90 hours

ACADEMIC STATUS: GOOD STANDING, WARNING, PROBATION, SUSPENSION

A grade point average of 2.00 (C average) is required for graduation from Georgia Southwestern State University. (Some curricula may require a higher average.) A student whose performance is below this level exhibits academic deficiencies. The University uses the cumulative/institution grade point average. This grade point average is used in determining academic standing. The following table shows the minimal cumulative/institution grade point average a student must achieve to make acceptable progress toward the 2.00 average and graduation.

Total Hours Earned
(including hours accepted in transfer)  
 Required Minimum Cumulative/Institution G.P.A.
0-15    1.50
16-30    1.65
31-60    1.75
61 and above    2.00

The grade point average is calculated each term and appears on the academic transcript to inform the student of his/her progress, along with the academic status of the student. The categories used by the University are Good Standing, Academic Warning, Academic Probation, Academic Suspension, Restricted Enrollment, and Learning Support.

Good Standing

A student will be placed in Good Standing if the cumulative/institution GPA is equal to or above the Required Minimum GPA for the total number of hours the student has earned.

Academic Warning

A student will be placed on Academic Warning at the end of any term in which the cumulative/institutional GPA falls below the required minimum for the total hours earned. The student will have only one semester in which to raise the GPA to the required minimum and return to Good Standing. If not, the student is placed on Academic Probation. Students on Academic Warning are encouraged to take advantage of supplemental instruction resources.

Academic Probation

A student will be placed on Academic Probation if the student fails to return to Good Standing at the end of the semester in which the academic standing of the student was Academic Warning. The student will have only one term to raise the GPA to the required minimum and return to Good Standing. If not, the student is placed on Academic Suspension. Students on Academic Probation are strongly encouraged to take advantage of Academic Assistance resources.

Academic Suspension

A student will be placed on Academic Suspension if the student fails to achieve Good Standing while on Probation. The student must stay out of school for one semester or choose to remain in school with Restricted Enrollment status (see below). To return to school, the student must write a letter of appeal to the Office of Academic Affairs. When the student returns, the academic status of the student is Academic Warning and the Warning-Probation-Suspension process starts over. That is, the student will have two semesters at most to raise the GPA to the Required Minimum and return to Good Standing, or the student will be suspended again. The maximum number of suspensions allowed is two. At the third suspension, the student will be suspended from GSW for a minimum of one calendar year.

Normally a student will not be reinstated after the third suspension. The student may, however, appeal this dismissal by stating his/her case in writing to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Appeals relative to dismissal after the third suspension will be considered on a case by case basis with no guarantee of readmission.

A student on Academic Suspension will not be allowed to register for courses offered by the University, unless the student has been granted Restricted Enrollment Status.

Courses taken at other institutions while a student is on Academic Suspension from Georgia Southwestern will not be accepted in transfer.

Students returning to GSW after the first suspension are required to enroll in ACSK 1100, Academic Skills, during the first term of re-enrollment.

Restricted Enrollment

As an alternative to suspension, a student may request from the Associate Dean for Academic Services to remain in school with Restricted Enrollment status. This status means that the student will stay in school but may enroll primarily in repeat courses and ACSK 1100, Academic Skills, in order to improve the student's GPA to return to Good Standing. Restricted Enrollment is the only alternative available to students who are on suspension.

Not returning to Good Standing by the end of the Restricted Enrollment term will result in an additional suspension for the student, and the student will remain out of school for a minimum of one semester. The student accepting this status will be advised by his/her assigned academic advisor. A Restricted Enrollment Agreement will be signed by the student, the advisor, and the Associate Dean for Academic Services before the student is allowed to register. A student on Restricted Enrollment may drop or add courses only with the approval of the Office of Academic Affairs.

The Restricted Enrollment status is not available to Learning Support students or transient students.

Readmission after Suspension

A student on Academic Suspension who wishes to be readmitted to the University must write a letter to the Vice President for Academic Affairs requesting readmission. The letter must include all facts which the student wishes considered. Each request for readmission will be considered individually, and nothing in this section should be interpreted to mean that readmission is automatic.

Readmission may be denied if, in the professional judgment of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the student cannot perform satisfactory college level work.

Any student requesting readmission must complete a readmission form from the Registrar's Office. Students returning from the first suspension must take ACSK 1100, Academic Skills, during their first term of enrollment.

Learning Support Program

A student who is taking one or more Learning Support courses will be given this status until the student exits all required Learning Support courses. The policies of the Board of Regents and the GSW Learning Support Programs will have precedence over the policies of GSW concerning Academic Suspension. The Restricted Enrollment academic status is not applicable to Learning Support students.

ACADEMIC HONORS

President's List

During any semester, a student who completes a load of at least fifteen semester hours of credit and earns an average grade of 4.00 will be named to the President's List.

Dean's List

During any semester, a student who completes a load of at least fifteen semester hours of credit and earns an average grade of 3.50 through 3.99 will be named to the Dean's List.

Academic Achievement List

During any semester, a student is on the Academic Achievement List if he/she is in Academic Good Standing, has previously earned at least 15 hours of credit at Georgia Southwestern, is enrolled in 3 to 14 hours of credit, and earns a semester GPA of 3.5 or better.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS

In order to be eligible to graduate with honors from Georgia Southwestern State University, the following two requirements must be met:

A student must earn a total of at least 54 semester hours of academic credit at Georgia Southwestern State University.

The grade point for honors must be an average of the final grades earned on work completed at all accredited colleges and universities attended and must fall into one of the following categories:

  • Graduation cum laude requires a minimum grade point average of 3.50;
  • Graduation magna cum laude requires a minimum grade point average of 3.70;
  • Graduation summa cum laude requires a minimum grade point average of 3.90.

Only candidates for baccalaureate degrees are considered for academic honors at graduation.

FINAL EXAMINATIONS

A student who has three final examinations scheduled for the same day may request a change of date for one final through

the Office of Academic Affairs.

Times and dates for final examinations may not be changed to accommodate students' travel plans. Permission for a student to change his/her final exam time and/or date must be obtained from the Office of Academic Affairs. The final examination schedule is available in the on-line schedule of classes on RAIN

RE-EXAMINATIONS FOR SENIORS

A senior preparing for graduation within two (2) semesters who earns a final grade of F or D in a course may have the opportunity of one re-examination in that course. After reviewing the eligibility requirements for re-examination with the instructor of the course (based on the conditions listed below), the student must request permission for the re-examination in writing from the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The instructor will be informed in writing whether permission has been granted. Conditions for re-examinations include the following:

a. The original course grade earned must not be the result of a violation of the Policy on Academic Integrity or the instructor's written policy on course attendance.
b. It must be mathematically possible to achieve the necessary passing grade in the course using the result of the re-examination.
c. The course must be a non-core course numbered 2000 or above which is necessary for graduation.
d. There must be no opportunity to repeat the course before the scheduled graduation.
e. Graded assignments for which a re-exam may occur include an examination, a project, a presentation, a paper, or another assignment as defined by course requirements. The assignment to be repeated will be determined by the instructor of the course.
f. A student cannot apply this re-examination policy in more than two courses.
g. The request for the re-examination must be made within thirty (30) days of the end of the term in which the grade was received.
h. Graduating seniors who fail the tests given by the Department of History and Political Science to meet the geography, U.S. history/Georgia history, and U.S. Constitution/Georgia Constitution requirements are entitled to a single retest in the deficient area during the term immediately preceding their graduation date. Retests are limited to two areas. Students in this situation should contact the secretary of the Department of History and Political Science.
i. According to the Board of Regents procedures, this policy does not apply to the Regents' Testing Program.

ATTENDANCE

Students are expected to attend all classes. If an absence is necessary, the student is responsible for reporting the reason to the instructor; in such cases, each instructor will take whatever action he or she deems necessary. Faculty members will make their absence policies clear to the students enrolled in their classes in writing and within the first week of the semester.

Penalties for excessive absences in each course are set at the beginning of each semester by the faculty member teaching that course. Students with excessive absences in a class may receive a grade of F for the course.

SCHEDULE ADJUSTMENTS

Adding or Dropping Courses

Following registration for the term, students may add or drop courses during the published add/drop period.

  • Students must discuss adding or dropping courses with their advisors.
  • Students who enter courses after the first day of class are responsible for making up missed assignments.
  • Students may add or drop a Learning Support course only with the approval of the Learning Support Coordinator. Students enrolled in both Learning Support classes and degree credit courses cannot drop the Learning Support courses without dropping the degree credit courses as well.
  • Students may not drop a Regents' remediation course without the approval of the Registrar or the Learning Support Coordinator.

After the published add/drop period, students may adjust their schedules only by "withdrawal." (See below.)

Students registered for courses that have the first class meeting after the designated add/drop period will be subject to the withdrawal from class policy or the withdrawal from the university policy below. Any orientation session for online or off-campus courses is considered the first class meeting for the course.

Withdrawal from a Course

After the add/drop period, a student must officially withdraw from a course by completing the "Withdrawal from Class" form available on RAIN or in the Registrar's Office. This form must be returned to the Registrar's Office upon completion. The student is fully responsible for collecting the appropriate signatures and submitting the completed form to the Registrar's office.

  • Withdrawal from class without penalty requires the student to complete the Withdrawal from Class form and return it to the Registrar's Office by the published no-penalty date of one week after midterm. A student following this procedure will receive a grade of W (Withdrawn).
  • Withdrawal from class without penalty will not be permitted after the published 'no penalty' date except for non-academic reasons. Documentation must be provided by the student to receive a W rather than a WF (Withdrawn Failing).
  • Students with Learning Support requirements who are enrolled in both Learning Support courses and degree credit courses may not withdraw from the required Learning Support courses with a "W" unless they also withdraw from the degree credit courses.

All withdrawals from class must be approved and completely processed before the last day of classes. A student who does not officially withdraw from a class will receive a grade of F in that course for the term.

Withdrawal from the University

Students withdrawing from all classes and exiting the University after the first day of classes must meet with the Director of Counseling Services to initiate the official "Withdrawal from the University" process.

  • Withdrawal from the University prior to the no-penalty date of one week after midterm will result in grades of W (withdrawn) for all courses.
  • Withdrawal from the University after the no-penalty date will result in grades of WF (withdrawn failing) except for documented non-academic reasons.

All withdrawals from the University must be approved and completely processed before the last day of classes. The student is fully responsible for supplying all pertinent documentation to the Director of Counseling Services.

Failure to withdraw from the University following the proper procedure will result in grades of F in all courses, and no refund will be given.

ADMINISTRATIVE WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE DURING THE FIRST WEEK OF CLASSES

Students registered for fall or spring semesters, who attend none of the class meetings during the first week of classes and do not inform the instructor of their intentions to remain in the course or do not drop the course within the published period will be administratively withdrawn from the course. It is the responsibility of the faculty member to document such absences.

Instructors must take roll during the first week of classes, until they receive final rolls. The faculty member will inform the Registrar that the student is not attending classes by notation on the verification roll provided after the first week of class.

Students will be contacted in writing by the Registrar and informed that they will be administratively withdrawn if they do not contact that office by a specified date.

STUDENT ABSENCE POLICY FOR UNIVERSITY SANCTIONED EVENTS

Faculty members will set policies for absences from class and the effect absences may have on final grades. They will make their expectations concerning absences known to their students in writing during the first week of class.

However, a student who is absent from a class as a result of representing this institution at a University-sanctioned event will not be penalized for the absence. In these cases, the student will be given an opportunity to complete any work that may have been missed as a result of the absence. It is the student's responsibility to notify the instructor in advance of an anticipated absence.

For an event to be sanctioned by the University, approval by the Office of Academic Affairs must be obtained in advance of the event.

Any exceptions to this policy must be approved by the Vice President of Academic Affairs.

POLICY ON ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Students at Georgia Southwestern State University are expected to conform to high standards of intellectual and academic integrity. The University assumes as a basic and minimum standard of conduct that students be honest and that they submit for credit only the product of their own efforts. Scholastic ideals and the need for fairness require that all dishonest work be rejected as a basis for academic credit. They also require that students refrain from all forms of dishonorable conduct in the course of their academic careers.

Dishonest work will be treated as a serious offense by the faculty and administration of Georgia Southwestern. Multiple infractions may be cause for permanent expulsion from the University. An instructor who receives dishonest work from a student has several options. At a minimum, the work should be rejected as a basis for academic credit. At the discretion of the instructor, the student may be given a score of zero on the assignment in question, may be required to rewrite the assignment, may be given a grade of F in the course, may not be recommended for admission to Teacher Education or the Nursing programs, or may be penalized in some intermediate way. A student found guilty of submitting dishonest work will have this information and the instructor's course of action placed on file in the Office of Academic Affairs so that if future instructors receive dishonest work from that same student, the student may be penalized by the institution, resulting in possible expulsion. Given the serious nature of infractions of this policy, students have a right to know what constitutes academic dishonesty and have a right to a fair and consistent procedure before severe penalties are imposed. The examples given below are intended to clarify the standards by which academic integrity is judged. They are meant to be illustrative and are not exhaustive. There may be cases which fall outside of these examples and which are deemed unacceptable by the academic community.

Definitions and Examples of Dishonest Behavior

Plagiarism

It is a violation of academic honesty to submit plagiarized work. Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to, asking someone to write part or all of an assignment, copying someone else's work (published or unpublished), inadequately documenting research, downloading material from electronic sources without appropriate documentation, or representing others' works or ideas as the student's own.

The student is responsible for understanding the legitimate and accurate use of sources, the appropriate ways of acknowledging and citing academic, scholarly or creative indebtedness, and the consequences of violating this responsibility.

Cheating on Examinations

It is a violation of academic integrity to cheat on an examination. Cheating on an examination includes, but is not limited to, giving or receiving unauthorized help before, during, or after an in-class or out-of-class examination. Examples of unauthorized help include using unauthorized notes during an examination, viewing another student's exam, and allowing another student to view one's exam.

Unauthorized Collaboration

It is a violation of academic honesty to submit for credit work which is the result of unauthorized collaboration. It is also a violation to provide unauthorized collaboration. Unauthorized collaboration includes giving or receiving unauthorized help for work that is required to be the effort of a single student, such as the receiving or giving of unauthorized assistance in the preparation of any academic or clinical laboratory assignment.

Falsification

It is a violation of academic honesty to falsify information or misrepresent material in an academic work. This includes, but is not limited to, the falsification of citations of sources, the falsification of experimental or survey results, and the falsification of computer or other data.

Multiple Submissions

It is a violation of academic honesty to submit substantial portions of the same work for credit more than once without the explicit consent of the instructor(s) to whom the work is submitted for additional credit. If a work product is to be substantially revised or updated, the student must contact the instructor in advance to discuss necessary revisions. The faculty member may require a copy of the original document for comparison purposes.

Obligations to Report Suspected Violations

Members of the academic community (students, faculty, administration, and staff) are expected to report suspected violations of these standards of academic conduct to the appropriate authority: the instructor, department chair, academic dean, or Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Evidence and Burden of Proof

In determining whether or not academic dishonesty has occurred, the standard which should be used is that guilt must be proven by the instructor with a preponderance of evidence. That is, it should appear to a reasonable and impartial mind that it is more likely than not that academic dishonesty has occurred.

Procedures for Resolving Matters of Academic Dishonesty

When an instructor believes that academic dishonesty has occurred, the instructor will inform the student that academic dishonesty is believed to have taken place. The instructor will explain to the student what the penalties will be should the guilt be proven by a preponderance of evidence. If the student maintains that academic dishonesty did not take place, the student should discuss the matter with the instructor and present evidence (if possible) demonstrating that the work was done in an honest manner. Should the instructor and student not resolve the matter, then they will bring the matter to the Department Chair. If the matter is not resolved at this level, then the matter will be brought to the Academic Dean. If the matter is still unresolved, it will be brought to the Vice President of Academic Affairs. The decision of the Vice President may be appealed to the President, who would then refer it to the Committee on Academic Grievance for its recommendation before rendering a decision. The President's decision is final and binding.

REGENTS' TESTING PROGRAM

Georgia Southwestern State University and all units of the University System of Georgia participate in the Regents' Testing Program. The policy of the Board of Regents concerning this examination of reading and writing competency is as follows:

An examination (the Regents' Test) to assess the competency level in reading and writing of all students enrolled in undergraduate degree programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in University System institutions shall be administered. The following statement shall be the policy of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia on this examination.

The formulation and administration of the Regents' Test shall be as determined by the Chancellor.

Each institution of the University System of Georgia shall assure the other institutions, and the System as a whole, that students obtaining a degree from that institution possess certain minimum skills of reading and writing. The Regents' Testing Program has been developed to help in the attainment of this goal. The objectives of the Testing Program are (1) to provide System-wide information on the status of student competence in the areas of reading and writing; and (2) to provide a uniform means of identifying those students who fail to attain the minimum levels of competence in the areas of reading and writing.

Students enrolled in undergraduate degree programs leading to the baccalaureate degree shall pass the Regents' Test as a requirement for graduation. Students must take the test in their first semester of enrollment after earning 30 credit hours if they have not taken it previously. (Institutions may not prohibit students who have earned at least 30 credit hours from taking the test for the first time.) At an institution's discretion, students may be permitted to take the test during a semester in which they are not enrolled.

Each institution shall provide an appropriate program of remediation and shall require students who have not passed both parts of the test by the time they have earned 45 credit hours to take the appropriate remedial course or courses each semester of enrollment until they have passed both parts.

Students with 30 or more semester credit hours transferring from outside of the University System of Georgia or from a University System program that does not require the Regents' Test should take the test during their first semester of enrollment in a program leading to the baccalaureate degree. Those who have not passed before their third semester of enrollment are subject to the remediation requirement.

A student holding a baccalaureate or higher degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education will not be required to complete the Regents' Test in order to receive a degree from a University System institution.

REGENTS’ TEST EXEMPTIONS

Upon admission to GSW, students with the appropriate minimum test scores listed below on nationally administered standardized tests will have satisfied the Regents Testing requirements.

In order to exempt the Regents’ Reading Test Requirement, students must have one of the following scores:

  • S.A.T. Verbal score of 510 or greater
  • A.C.T. Reading score of 23 or greater

In order to exempt the Regents’ Essay Test Requirement, students must have one of the following scores:

  • Advanced Placement English score of 3 or greater
  • International Baccalaureate higher-level English score of 4 or greater
  • S.A.T. II English Writing score of 650 or greater

Students are not permitted to re-test after the point of admission. If a student exempts one part of the Regents Test Requirements, the student must satisfy the remaining part. Students can review their status on the GSW transcript that is available on RAIN Students who were admitted to GSW through an Institutional administration of the S.A.T. exam will not be eligible for this exemption.

If a student is unsure of which test administration they attended, they should contact the Registrar’s Office, located in Sanford Hall.

Transfer students entering GSW from a University System of Georgia Institution will have their Regents’ Test Requirements updated based on the information from the official transcript of the prior school.

Transfer students from private institutions or out-of-state schools will be required to produce one of the following types of documents in order to exempt Regents:

  • Official S.A.T. or A.C.T. scores
  • Official letter from the Registrar of the prior institution, including the school seal, verifying test scores were from a nationally administered test.

GEORGIA SOUTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY POLICY FOR THE REGENTS' TESTING PROGRAM

1. Students who have earned 30 or fewer hours may attempt both sections of the Regents' Test. Students are encouraged to complete ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 early in their college curriculum and to attempt the Regents' Test as soon as possible.

2. Unless the requirement has been met previously, it is mandatory for students who have earned between 30 and 44 credits to attempt the section(s) of the test not completed the next time it is offered.

3. Students who have earned 45 or more credit hours and have not passed both sections of the test are required to schedule remediation each semester for the section(s) not passed. Students who are in this category but do not register for the appropriate remedial course(s) or do not successfully complete the course will not be allowed to test that term. When either the essay or reading section is passed, the students' records are updated accordingly and remediation for that section is no longer required.

4. Students transferring into Georgia Southwestern State University from within the University System who have credit for ENGL1101 and ENGL1102 should attempt the Regents' Test during their first term of enrollment at GSW. Those students within the University System who have 30 or more credits transferred must attempt the Regents' Test during their first term of attendance.

5. Students transferring into Georgia Southwestern State University with 30 or more credits from outside the University System or from a System program that does not require the Regents' Test will have two semesters to complete the requirements, after which time remediation will be required until both sections of the Regents' Test are passed. All transfer students in this category are urged to take the Regents' Test during their first term of enrollment at GSW.

6. Students who have earned 100 or more credit hours and have not passed both sections of the Regents' Test can enroll only in remediation classes until both sections of the Regents' Test have been passed.

7. Permission to attend another institution as a transient student will neither be authorized nor recognized if the transient term does not include Regents' remediation classes that would be required by Georgia Southwestern State University. Any exceptions to this procedure must be approved by the Regents' Testing Program Coordinator in the Registrar's Office prior to the transient term. Students desiring to attempt the Regents' Test on another campus while in transient status must obtain written permission from the Regents' Testing Program Coordinator in the Registrar's Office prior to taking the test.

8. Students who have been classified as non-native speakers of the English language by the Regents' Testing Program Coordinator are required to pass the alternative version of the Regent's Test.

9. The Regents' Test is a University System requirement. It is the student's responsibility to plan for the Regents' Test Program; to sign-up for the test; to take the test; to follow procedures outlined above for remediation and retesting if either section of the test is failed; and to enroll for only remediation classes after reaching 100 semester credit hours if either or both sections of the test have not been passed.

RAIN (Registration and Academic Information Network)

The Registration and Academic Information Network (RAIN) allows students to access their academic and financial records on-line. Students can view holds, midterm grades, final grades, academic transcripts, registration status, class schedules, curriculum sheets, as well as their Financial Aid status, Account Summaries and Fee Assessments. RAIN provides a convenient method for students and faculty to obtain information via the web. It is a secured site which is continually expanding to provide 24 hour access to all students. Information is routinely added to RAIN, including term-specific notices and deadlines. Students must access RAIN to receive grades for all courses since grade mailers are no longer produced. Instructions for access to RAIN can be found at www.gsw.edu or in the Registrar's Office.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

GENERAL BACCALAUREATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

In addition to specific requirements of the major and minor fields of study, the following requirements must be satisfied by all students seeking the baccalaureate degree.

1. Candidates for a baccalaureate degree must earn a minimum of 120 semester hours of academic credit and complete three specified courses in physical education. A transfer student who has completed an Associate of Arts or an Associate of Science degree in a transfer program will not be required to fulfill the physical education requirements. All fulltime freshmen baccalaureate students must complete UNIV 1000 – The GSW Experience course for graduation requirements.

NOTE: A student who changes major may have to complete additional hours of coursework beyond those required for completion of the program.

2. All baccalaureate programs require at least 21 hours of upper division courses in the major field and at least 39 hours of upper division work overall.

3. A quality grade point average of 2.00 or higher is required for graduation. Some curricula require a higher average. Grades from transfer credit are calculated for graduation with honors purposes only.

4. A candidate must earn in residence at least twenty-seven of the forty hours of credit earned immediately preceding graduation. Candidates admitted to the University for the final year of work must be in residence for a minimum of two semesters and must complete at least thirty hours of credit including fifteen hours of upper division credit in the major field. If less than a normal load of academic credit is carried, each three-hour course counts as one fifth of a semester toward residence requirements.

5. Degree candidates may earn credit in correspondence, extension work, and credit by examination, but not more than ten hours in the major discipline and no more than thirty hours of credit earned in this manner will count toward degree requirements.

6. All candidates for baccalaureate degrees must satisfactorily complete the General Core Curriculum requirements.

7. Candidates for the B.A. degree must present credit for at least six hours of a foreign language sequence numbered 2000 or above. College Preparatory Curriculum foreign language deficiency requirements do not count as part of this sequence.

8. Candidates for the B.S. degree in some majors (See Bulletin requirements for specific major) must present semester credit for a foreign language sequence. College Preparatory Curriculum foreign language deficiency requirements do not count as part of this sequence.

9. Certain multi-lingual students may have the foreign language requirement waived if they can demonstrate proficiency in a language other than English and other than their native tongue in the case of foreign students.

10. A candidate must complete English 1101 with a grade of C or higher or must demonstrate proficiency on the CLEP test. A baccalaureate degree candidate must earn a grade of C or higher in English 1102 also.

11. Candidates are required to satisfy the provisions of the Georgia State Code 32-171 as amended by The General Assembly, which requires all candidates for a degree to pass either courses in or an appropriate examination on the history of the United States, the history of Georgia, The United States Constitution, and the Constitution of Georgia.

12. Candidates for the bachelor degree must make a satisfactory score on the Regents' Test, the University System of Georgia reading and writing skills test.

13. Students who were enrolled initially prior to the fall semester 2002 are required to pass a test of geographic knowledge or to earn a passing grade in one of the following courses: SOSC 1000, SOSC 1101, GEOG 1101, GEOG 4550, POLS 4550. Students entering fall 2002 or later do not have to meet this requirement.

14. Candidates for the B.A. degree must complete a minor field of study. The minor will consist of 15-18 semester hours in the field of study with at least nine hours at the upper division course level. The minor will be planned through consultation between the chairs of the major and minor schools/departments.

15. Students in some degree programs and majors are required to take an exit examination prior to graduation. A minimum score may be required. Students should contact their advisors for specific details.

GENERAL ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

The applicant who meets all of the requirements for admission to GSW and an approved technical college may enroll in either the technical college or GSW. However, should the applicant wish to attend both institutions concurrently, he/she would be restricted to only three (3) semester hours of academic work at GSW.

 

Requirements for the Associate in Applied Science (Career Degree)

1. Completion of an approved technical college requirements for the appropriate program.
2. Twenty-one semester hours of general education courses at Georgia Southwestern State University ("General Education", not necessarily core curriculum)
3. At least one course in each of the following areas:
a. Written Communication
b. Natural Science
c. Mathematics
d. Computer Literacy
e. Social Science
4. Completion of the U.S. and Georgia history and Constitution legislative requirements.
5. A cumulative/institutional grade point average of at least 2.00 on all work attempted at GSW.
6. A maximum of 10 semester hours may be transferred from an accredited institution to meet these requirements.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

All baccalaureate students are required to take PEDS 1010, PEDS 2000 and one activity course from the PEDS activity courses. A student who fails the swimming proficiency exam in PEDS 1010 must enroll in PEDS 1100 (Beginning Swimming) to complete the physical education requirements. Students should complete all the requirements during their first two years of enrollment. A transfer student who has completed a transferable Associate of Arts or an Associate of Science degree will not be required to fulfill the physical education requirements.

Exceptions are granted to veterans with at least one year of active duty, students barred by a physician's recommendation and students entering the B.S. Nursing Program. There is no requirement for veterans with at least one year of active duty. Veterans must present documentation to the Registrar’s Office in the form of a DD214 in order to be awarded the P.E. exemption. Students barred by a physician's recommendation are required to complete PEDS 2000 and HPER 2040. For graduation, all B.S. Nursing Program students are required to have credit for one activity P.E. course.

P.E. courses taken at another institution and showing on the student's transcript will count toward this requirement. Any exception to this policy must be approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs or the Associate Dean for Academic Services.

Students in Associate in Applied Science programs in cooperation with approved technical colleges are not required to take courses in physical education. However, they must complete all physical education requirements if they pursue any other degree.

Students participating in intercollegiate athletics may receive credit for physical education for that semester in which they participate, but they must be carried on the appropriate class roll.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Catalog for Graduation Evaluation

Under the guidance of the academic advisor, a student may select to be evaluated for graduation from any catalog in effect during the time of enrollment provided the enrollment has been continuous.

Students readmitted or reinstated will be evaluated for graduation from the catalog in effect at the time of readmission or reinstatement or any catalog in effect during subsequent periods of continuous enrollment.

Students changing majors will be evaluated for graduation from the catalog in effect at the time of the change or any catalog in effect during subsequent periods of continuous enrollment.

Each student is responsible for determining the appropriate catalog to be used for academic advisement and for evaluation of graduation requirements. Catalog selection applies only to the course requirements of that catalog. All other academic procedures and graduation requirements must be satisfied according to regulations in effect at the time of graduation. Students desiring further information on the selection of an appropriate catalog may contact their major department chair/academic dean or the Registrar.

Application for Graduation- Undergraduate Students

The Application for Graduation for fall semester must be completed on or before December 1 prior to the academic year in which the degree is expected. The Application for Graduation for spring semester must be completed on or before May 1 prior to the academic year in which the degree is expected. Students who plan to graduate at completion of summer term must apply on or before September 1 prior to the year in which the degree is expected. Applications for graduation are available at the Registrar's Office and on RAIN (Registration and Academic Information Network).

Graduation Term Apply no later than of the year prior   
Fall   December 1
Spring   May 1
Summer   September 1

ORIENTATION

Georgia Southwestern State University requires a one credit hour orientation course (UNIV 1000) of all new, full-time freshmen. New entering transfer students with less than nine hours of transfer credit must also enroll in UNIV 1000. This highly structured freshman orientation/advisement program has been instituted at Georgia Southwestern State University to facilitate the new student's transition to college-level work.

UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA CORE CURRICULUM

The Core Curriculum of the University System of Georgia was established for the general purpose of aiding and facilitating the educational progress of students as they pursue baccalaureate degrees within and among the units of the University System. It represents an effort to deal effectively with increasing curricular problems of students which result from increased enrollment at institutions of higher education, increased number and percentage of students enrolled in two-year institutions, increased mobility of the student population, increased number and complexity of major fields of studies offered by senior units, and increased problems related to transfer of credit among units of the University System.

The Core Curriculum provides for (1) sixty semester credit hours of which forty-two are in general education and eighteen are in a major area of study, (2) the assurance of acceptance of transfer of the Core Curriculum or a fractional part thereof toward a baccalaureate degree, and (3) the preservation of the maximum possible amount of institutional autonomy.

The Core Curriculum provides the following six areas of study:

A.   Essential Skills   9
B.   Institutional Options   4-5
C.   Humanities/Fine Arts   6
D.   Science, Mathematics, Technology   10-11
E.   Social Science   12
F.   Courses related to the major   18

GEORGIA SOUTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY CORE REQUIREMENTS

The specific courses which must be completed by all students working toward the baccalaureate degree are listed below. These courses are begun in the first semester of college enrollment and should be completed during the first two years. In certain programs or for transfer students, some substitutions in the core are accepted. Student should contact the appropriate academic dean or department chair for details.

A student transferring to GSW with a transferable Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree from a college or university within the University System of Georgia will have met the GSW core requirements as long as the student does not change majors. Core courses required by GSW but not by the student's previous institution may have to be taken to prepare the student for upper division course work. However, the student will not be required to complete more than a total of 120 semester credit hours, excluding physical education and orientation, to earn the degree. Students in this category who change majors may have additional core courses to complete, particularly in Core Areas D and F.

A student transferring to GSW with an Associate of Applied Science or an Associate of Science in Nursing degree from a college or university within the University System of Georgia will be required to meet GSW core requirements. Core courses already completed at the previous institution will be considered on a course-by-course basis.

Semester System

General Core Requirements

Area A: Essential Skills 9 semester hours

ENGL 1101 - Composition I  3 hours
ENGL 1102 - Composition II  3 hours
MATH 1111* - College Algebra  3 hours

*or a course for which MATH 1111 is a prerequisite, excluding MATH 2204 (Elementary Statistics). MATH 1113 (Precalculus) or MATH 1120 (Calculus I) is required in Area A for mathematics and science degree programs. MATH 1120 (Calculus I) is required for the dual degree program.

Area B: GSW Institutional Options (minimum)                             4-5 semester hours

Students with 10 semester hours in Area D must complete 5 semester hours in Area B.

Students with 11 semester hours in Area D must complete 4 semester hours in Area B.

Select from the following courses:

CIS 1000 - Computer Literacy  2 hours
SOSC 1000 - Background to Current Events  2 hours
SOSC 1101 - The World and Its People  3 hours
ENGL 2200 - Introduction to Professional Writing  3 hours
COMM 1110** - Fundamentals of Speech  3 hours
SOCI 2295 - American Mosaic  2 hours
Foreign Language*  3 hours
THEA 1110** - Performance Skills for Business and Professions  3 hours

*must be a 2000 level or higher foreign language course.
** recommended for teacher education majors.

Area C: Humanities/Fine Arts 6 semester hours

Select one of the following:

ENGL 2110 - World Literature                                             3 hours
ENGL 2120 - British Literature
ENGL 2130 - American Literature

Select one of the following:                                                               3 hours

ARTC 1100 - Art Appreciation
MUSC1100 - Music Appreciation
THEA1100 - Theatre Appreciation

Area D: Mathematics, Science,

Technology (minimum) 10 semester hours

Di: Non-Science Majors Only    

One lab science course from List A below   4 hours
One science course from List A or List B below   3 hours
One course from List A, List B, or List C below   3 or 4 hours

Dii: Science or Non Science Majors    

Two course lab science sequence from List A below   8 hours
One course from List A, List B or List C below 3 or   4 hours

List A (4 hours each)

BIOL 1107 & BIOL 1107L - Essentials of Biology I Lecture and Lab
BIOL 1108 & BIOL 1108L - Essentails of Biology II Lecture and Lab
BIOL 2107 - Principles of Biology I
BIOL 2108 - Principles of Biology II
GEOL 1121 - Introductory Geosciences I
GEOL 1122 - Introductory Geosciences II
CHEM 1211 & CHEM1211L - Principles of Chemistry I Lecture and Lab
CHEM 1212 & CHEM1212L - Principles of Chemistry II Lecture and Lab
PHYS 1111 - Introductory Physics I
PHYS 1112 - Introductory Physics II
PHYS 2211 - Principles of Physics I
PHYS 2212 - Principles of Physics II

List B (3 hours each)

BIOL 1107 - Essentials of Biology I Lecture
BIOL 1108 - Essentials of Biology II Lecture
CHEM 1211 - Principles of Chemistry I Lecture
CHEM 1212 - Principles of Chemistry II Lecture
GEOL 1211 - The Earth's Evolving Environment
GEOL 1221 - Solar System Exploration
BIOL 1500 - Applied Botany
PHYS 1221 - Solar System Astronomy
PHYS 1222 - Stellar Astronomy

List C (3 or 4 hours each)

CIS 2000 - Desktop Publishing and Multimedia Presentations
CIS 2100 - Microcomputer Interfacing & Configuration
CIS 2300 - Business Applications Programming
CSCI 1301 - Intro to Structured Programming
CSCI 1302 - Advanced Structured Programming
CSCI 2100 - Assembly Language Programming
CSCI 2500 - Discrete Structures
MATH 1113 - Precalculus
MATH 1120 - Calculus I
MATH 2204 - Elementary Statistics
PSYC 1102 - Psychology as a Natural Science

NOTES:

1. BIOL 1107/1107L and 1108/1108L are not open to students with credit in BIOL 2107 or BIOL 2108.
2. PHYS 1111 and PHYS 1112 are not open to students with credit in PHYS 2211 and PHYS 2212.
3. PSYC 3301 Psychological Statistics and SOCI 3331 Sociological Statistics cannot be used to meet Core Area D requirements.

Area E: Social Sciences 12 semester hours

POLS 1101 - American Government   3 hours
HIST 1111 - World Civilization I or HIST 1112 - World Civilization II  3 hours
HIST 2111 - US History I or HIST 2112 - US History II  3 hours

Select one course from the following: 3 hours

ANTH 1102 – Intro to Anthropology
ECON2105 - Principles of Macroeconomics
HIST1111 - World Civilization or
HIST 1112 - World Civilization II(additional World History course)
PSYC 1101* - Intro to Psychology
SOCI 1101 - Intro to Sociology

suggested for students pursuing certification in teaching fields.

Area F:Courses Related to Major 18 semester hours

Areas A-F of the Core Curriculum require a minimum of 60 semester credit hours.

DOUBLE MAJORS

A student who wishes to meet the requirements for more than one major within the same baccalaureate degree classification is pursuing a double major. Requirements for completion of a double major follow.

1. All degree requirements must be met for both majors.
2. Once major course requirements, exclusive of elective and minor requirements, have been met for the first major, a minimum of twenty semester credit hours must be completed for the second major.
3. The twenty hours (minimum) of credit for the second major may be taken in lieu of minor and elective requirements for the first major.
4. A minimum of nine of the additional hours for the second major must be at the upper division level.

Approval to complete a double major must be granted by the appropriate department chair or academic dean and be on file in the Registrar's Office no later than the date of application for graduation.

SECOND BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

A student who has completed a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution may earn a second baccalaureate degree at Georgia Southwestern State University of the same or different designation (B.S., B.A., B.B.A., B.S.Ed., B.F.A., etc.) conferred on the same or later date by meeting the following requirements:

1. All degree requirements in the second degree must be met. Courses completed for the first baccalaureate degree can be combined with courses completed after admission for the second degree to meet degree requirements for the second degree.
2. A minimum of thirty semester credit hours in addition to those required for the first baccalaureate degree must be earned at Georgia Southwestern State University.
3. A minimum of nine semester credit hours of the above thirty hours must be upper division courses in the major for the second degree.
4. The Georgia Legislative History and Constitution requirements must be met. A student whose first baccalaureate was earned at an institution in the State of Georgia should have completed that requirement prior to conferring of the first degree and will not be required to repeat that requirement.
5. The Geographic Knowledge requirement must be met by students enrolling prior to Fall 2002. A student whose first baccalaureate degree was earned at Georgia Southwestern State University will have already met this requirement and will not be required to repeat it.

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

Credit for prior experiential learning is available in selected undergraduate degree programs. A student in one of these degree programs should notify his or her academic advisor to determine if this policy applies. If applicable, the advisor notifies the appropriate academic dean or department chair, who convenes a faculty committee to review the student's portfolio to determine if credit for prior experiential learning is warranted and if so, the number of semester credit hours to be awarded. The total number of credit hours awarded for experiential learning cannot exceed 21 semester credit hours.

MILITARY CREDIT

Credit for prior military experience and training is determined on an individual basis, following the guidelines published by the American Council on Education for the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services. Students must submit official military transcripts for evaluation to the Registrar. Students should see the Registrar for additional information.

PROGRAMS OF STUDY

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS OF STUDY

Georgia Southwestern State University encourages the development of character through intellectual inquiry and examination of personal and professional values. Central to Georgia Southwestern's curricula is a general education experience which aims toward acquainting students with the intellectual heritage of mankind.

Georgia Southwestern State University faculty have affirmed that every student of this institution shall participate in learning experiences which will enable the graduate to

-think abstractly, analytically, and creatively;
-understand the nature of the scientific world and the impact of science and technology on the world:
-demonstrate competencies in reading, writing, speaking, and listening;
-understand people as social beings from both an historical and international perspective;
-demonstrate the ability to clarify his or her own values and understand those of other individuals and societies;
-appreciate the fine arts;
-demonstrate competencies in the use of information technology;
-understand the importance of sound physical and mental health habits;
-demonstrate an understanding that learning is a life-long process.

A major portion of this common body of knowledge is addressed in the core curriculum, an array of courses intended for completion during the first two years of college studies. Academic work in the junior and senior years is directed toward the mastery of a particular field of study.

Selection of a major field obviously depends upon the student's interests and vocational plans. The purpose of a college education, however, is not solely to provide vocational instruction, even though it lays the best foundation for the student's future vocation, but to assist the student in fulfilling responsibilities as a citizen and to develop into a cultivated and versatile individual. Regardless of vocational plans or preferred curriculum, the collegiate experience at Georgia Southwestern State University includes general education which provides each graduate with the breadth of knowledge necessary to become a productive citizen.

ASSESSMENT OF ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

To assess and improve academic programs, Georgia Southwestern State University conducts periodic studies of student achievement and satisfaction. Participation in assessment activities is expected of all students, although every student may not be selected for participation in every activity. The information obtained from these activities is used by the University to improve the quality of programs in order to better serve students.

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS

The University offers programs leading toward the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Business Administration, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Bachelor of Science in Education, and Bachelor of Applied Science degrees. Majors are available in the areas as follows:

Bachelor of Arts: Art, Dramatic Arts, English, History, Music, Political Science, Psychology.

Bachelor of Business Administration: Accounting, Management, Management with a Concentration in Human Resources Management, and Marketing.

Bachelor of Fine Arts: Art.

Bachelor of Science: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Geology, History,  Mathematics, Mathematics with Industrial Mathematics concentration, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Bachelor of Science in Education: Early Childhood Education, Exercise Science/Wellness,  Health and Physical Education, Middle Grades Education, Recreation, Special Education.

Bachelor's Degree with Teaching Certification: Art, Biology, Chemistry, English, History, Mathematics, and Music.

Bachelor of Applied Science: Technology Management.

Most bachelor's degree programs consist of a major and additional study in at least one other field of special interest. Students should determine their major fields of study prior to the fourth semester of university enrollment. Transfer students with advanced standing should determine their majors before scheduling classes.

The selection of a major should be made in consultation with the faculty advisor and the dean of the academic school which offers the major. A change of the student's major field of study must be registered with the Office of the Registrar.

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM IN ENGINEERING

Georgia Southwestern State University and Georgia Institute of Technology offer a dual degree program in all disciplines of engineering offered at Georgia Tech. The dual degree student enrolls at Georgia Southwestern State University for approximately three years. Upon acceptance to Georgia Tech, the student then enrolls there for approximately two years. When all degree requirements have been met, the student earns a bachelor's degree in science or mathematics from Georgia Southwestern and a bachelor's degree from Georgia Tech.

PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS

Students who plan to seek admission to professional schools may elect to follow appropriate pre-professional curricula. Pre-professional programs frequently chosen by students include dentistry, law, pharmacy, medicine, veterinary medicine, and many of the allied health sciences.

It is desirable that the student follow the prescribed curriculum of the professional school in which he or she intends to enroll. Students electing the professional goals of medicine, dentistry, veterinary, or pharmacy will probably enroll in a baccalaureate program with a major in either biology or chemistry. Students who plan to follow a legal career should consult with the pre-law advisor in the Department of History and Political Science (see pre-law listing in index). Students in the above listed programs should consult with the appropriate advisor early in the freshman year.

Students electing to enter professional schools in various programs of the allied health sciences will generally complete two to four years on this campus and then transfer to a program offered at such schools as the Medical College of Georgia, Georgia State University, North Georgia College and State University, Armstrong Atlantic State University, or Columbus State University. Such allied health programs include medical technology, physical therapy, physician assistants, and occupational therapy. Students must make application to the professional program and be accepted by the school offering the program. It is important that the student be competitive and meet the admissions requirements. The student should contact the institution offering the professional program for information on admission requirements early in the freshman year.

GSW INTERN PROGRAMS

Georgia Southwestern State University is a participant in several intern programs including the Georgia Intern Program and the Legislative Intern Program. Students may receive a maximum of twelve semester hours toward their degree for work as interns in public and non-profit agencies. Students from all academic areas are eligible for the program. Courses for which academic credit is to be awarded must be approved in advance by the dean of the school or chair of the department offering the courses and the Campus Coordinator of the program. Course numbers 4920-4930 in each discipline are reserved for Intern Program credit. Interested students should contact the Campus Coordinator of the GSW Intern Program in the Department of History and Political Science for additional information.

GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM

Students who have not decided on a particular program of study will be assigned to a General Education advisor. It is recommended that students follow the General Core Curriculum outlined in this bulletin. Unless the student has determined the major field of study prior to the fourth semester of enrollment, it is likely that financial aid will be discontinued.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Georgia Southwestern State University offers certificate programs in the following areas: European Union Studies, Latin American Studies, Religious Studies and Web Design.

EUROPEAN UNION STUDIES CERTIFICATE

The certificate in European Union Studies is a collaborative effort of University System of Georgia institutions. The program is open to all institutions and students of the University System, including students of Georgia Southwestern State University, as well as to professionals with an undergraduate degree. The program's purpose is to promote knowledge of the European Union (EU) and certify individuals as competent in the subject area of EU studies. Since the EU is one of the most important economic and political partners of the United States, this certification demonstrates valuable professional expertise to potential employers. For students in the academic track, the interdisciplinary certificate can be earned as a supplement to any conventional undergraduate degree.

Admission requirements

A certificate in European Union Studies can be earned in two ways. Under the academic track, a certificate is taken as part of an undergraduate degree program. Students from all academic majors are eligible to participate so long as they possess a minimum 2.75 cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA). Under the professional track, non-degree students - such as business executives - are eligible to enroll in the program upon proof of a valid undergraduate degree from an accredited institution. The minimum GPA requirement is waived.

Under either track, an application to the program cannot be made until successful completion of the following:

(1) the introductory course on the European Union (POLS 3200) with a grade of C or better
(2) 30 semester hours of earned academic credit
(3) completion of HIST 1111 or 1112 (World or Western Civilization)

To earn the EU Studies certificate, students must complete the certificate curriculum (18 hours) and fulfill the practicum experience requirement. Students must have a 3.0 cumulative GPA in curriculum courses upon completion of the program. An official certificate is awarded upon graduation, and the certificate is noted on the student's permanent transcripts. Students should refer to the European Union Studies curriculum sheet for individual course requirements.

Practicum experience

Since it is deemed crucial that students demonstrate more than an academic knowledge of the European Union to be certified as adequately prepared in the subject, a "real-life" practicum experience pertaining to the EU must be performed either in the form of an overseas visit or an internship. The overseas option is broadly defined and can be accommodated by a wide range of activities, including study or research abroad. The same flexibility applies to the internship, which can be served domestically or internationally. A student's specific practicum experience must be approved by the program's campus representative.

On-line courses and Transatlantic Joint Certificate

The EU Studies program has developed a curriculum of online courses in conjunction with European university partners. These are courses in different discipline areas that deal with various aspects of the EU and are taught jointly by University System institutions and European universities at specified times throughout the academic year. The program's campus representative maintains an updated list of these courses and a teaching schedule, as well as information about course registration.

The EU Studies program offers the option of acquiring a certificate that is jointly conferred with a European institution. This option requires students to complete - with a grade of B or better - a minimum of two online courses that are co-taught with European partner universities. Students completing this option have the EU Studies certificate awarded by both their home institution and one in Europe, thus giving them an academic credential from a respected European university.

Areas of Distinction

In addition to acknowledging competence in the EU generally, the certificate also highlights special achievements by providing a notation of "distinction" in two areas:

· Foreign language proficiency (6 semester hours at or above the 2000 level)
· Composition of a thesis

The foreign language distinction must be earned in a European language approved by the program's campus representative as appropriate to the certificate's objectives. A student with prior language skills can earn a distinction by successful completion of an examination demonstrating competence equivalent to the 2000 level. The exam is administered at the student's home institution.

The thesis can be written anytime during the final year of study. It is supervised by a committee composed of three faculty members representing at least two different academic disciplines. The program's campus representative maintains a more detailed description of thesis requirements.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet.

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES CERTIFICATE

The undergraduate Certificate in Latin American Studies (CLAS) recognizes a student's knowledge and understanding of a region of growing importance, both economically and culturally. The course of study is designed to be interdisciplinary and complementary to existing undergraduate programs. Those who satisfy the certificate requirements of their B.A./B.S., will be awarded a Certificate in Latin American Studies. This will be noted in the student's placement materials.

The Certificate in Latin American Studies is designed to provide an interdisciplinary, coherent unit of study which "certifies" competency in a subject area outside the traditional major. The CLAS is not designed to compete with existing programs. It offers an opportunity for University System of Georgia students to pursue an area of specialization which may not be offered by departmental curricula or may be unmet in conventional majors.

Admission Requirements

(1) The certificate in Latin American Studies must be taken with a formal degree program. Course work may be undertaken at two-year institutions but must be completed at a four-year university.
(2) Students must have a minimum grade point average of 2.8 on a scale of 4.0.
(3) Students must have earned 30 semesters hours of academic credit at a four-year institution OR
(4) 15 semester hours of academic credit at a two-year institution.
One three-hour interdisciplinary course which focuses on contemporary Latin America OR
A three-hour course on Latin American Culture and Civilization OR
A CD-Module based course on Latin America OR
A web-based or GSAMS course on Latin America with a grade of "C" or better.

Honors Option

A student may receive an Honors Certificate in Latin American Studies if he or she maintains an overall gpa of 2.8 and a gpa of 3.5 in his/her CLAS courses. The student must also submit a Senior Honors paper on a Latin American topic to a faculty member in that field. The paper must receive a minimum grade of B+.

Minor Option

Each institution of the University System of Georgia will determine if the CLAS may serve as a minor, with or without additional requirements.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES CERTIFICATE

The certificate in Religious Studies Program is an interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary effort that seeks to broaden the student's understanding of and appreciation for religion both as historical and cultural phenomenon.

Admission to the Religious Studies Program must be approved by the Religious Studies Program Coordinator. Students must complete at least 12 semester hours in courses numbered 3000 or above. A minimum grade of "C" is required in all course work counted towards the certificate.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet.

WEB DESIGN CERTIFICATE

The certificate in Web Design is an interdisciplinary program that provides the student with expertise in a high demand area. The student will be competent at designing Web sites and will have both artistic and technical skills.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet.

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS

The Associate of Applied Science degree (A.A.S.) is designed to provide students with technical and vocational training and a broader-based higher education in the arts and sciences.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet.

CONTINUING EDUCATION

The primary goal of the Division of Continuing Education and Economic Outreach is to serve the educational and training needs of adults, children, and organizations through credit and non-credit programming and to meet the personal and professional needs of Southwest Georgia by extending college resources throughout our service area. Continuing Education provides the bridge between the academic environment and the community through outreach efforts and public service. Various types of non-credit courses are offered and designed to appeal to the professional, cultural, and recreational interests of residents in the community. In addition, conferences, workshops, institutes, short courses, teleconferences, media/computer-assisted learning, and independent study courses are tailored to specific clientele.

A person may achieve their career goals and education with information technology focused e-learning. On-line certification training is available.

The Center for Adventure Education, another division of Continuing Education, provides high-quality, affordable educational opportunities for older adults and promotes the University nationwide as a preeminent provider in lifelong learning. Elderhostel, a non-profit educational organization, offers inexpensive, short-term academic programs.

Participants completing programs may receive Continuing Education Units (CEUs) and Staff Development Units for Teachers (SDUs) which are a nationally recognized method for measuring the non-credit work which an individual has completed.

THE CENTER FOR ASIAN STUDIES

Dr. Don Chang Lee, Director

Our Purpose
The Center for Asian Studies (CAS) was begun in 1988 to promote Asian language and culture programs for Georgia schools and businesses. In 1989, CAS expanded its purpose to promote cross-cultural understanding in the community, on campus, and in business environments through outreach programs and exchanges with Asian Institutions. Also in 1989, CAS established the English Language Institute (ELI) to focus on Teaching English as a Second Language (ESL).

Our Programs
In The Japanese Language Teacher Training Program (JLTTP), sponsored in cooperation with a Japanese intercultural exchange organization, the participants come to GSW to learn how to teach their native language as a foreign language in American schools. The participants are graduate students who teach Japanese at American colleges and universities or they are Japanese language instructors at elementary and secondary schools in America.

The English Language Institute (ELI) brings many students from foreign countries, mainly Asia, to GSW to study English prior to becoming regular students at GSW, other institutions in Georgia, or in other states. In addition GSW receives students who study English for other specific purposes: Nurses, English teachers, Japanese and Korean businessmen, government officials, and professors study English to learn American culture, society, and business practices and for professional enrichment.

Cross-Cultural Outreach
The Center for Asian Studies assists students who want to study abroad in an Asian country and international students at GSW who need counsel or advice. CAS conducts seminars and conferences for the business community to have a better insight into Asian culture and its importance in doing business with Asian people. The Center also provides services to schoolteachers to provide a better understanding of Asian culture and the behavior patterns of Asian children and to share the Asian culture with American children. The Center makes arrangements to establish exchange relationships with Asian educational institutions.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON ANY OF THESE PROGRAMS, PLEASE CALL (229) 931- 2346 OR FAX (229) 931-2335.

UNIVERSITY HONORS PROGRAM

The University Honors Program (UHP) at GSW offers exceptionally talented and motivated students an enriched environment for learning. Among its objectives, the UHP aims to promote life-long learning, to assist and guide students interested in graduate studies, and to encourage a studies abroad experience. The UHP also attempts to enhance and challenge the education of regularly enrolled students-by contact with honors students-as well as by the experience of participating faculty.

Admission: First-year students are admitted to the UHP by invitation. The Honors Program Committee will extend invitations to students based upon their SAT scores, high school GPA and rank in class, and recommendations where available. Transfer students, international students and students already at GSW may seek admission with a 3.4 GPA and referral by a faculty member. Rolling admissions apply.

The types of honors courses include 1) honors enrichment of a regular course with non-honors students enrolled; 2) special honors seminars; and 3) honors assistantships.

Participation Requirements: The UHP requires honors students to take at least two honors courses each year and maintain a minimum 3.2 overall GPA. Honors students who maintain a 3.5 or higher GPA in honors courses and a 3.5 or higher GPA over their last 60 hours and complete an honors senior thesis project will receive the distinction of "University Honors Scholar" at commencement. Other requirements include:

1. ENRICHED CORE COURSES: Students must take at least one enriched core course from each of the following areas:

Humanities (English or Fine Arts)

Social Sciences (History, Political Science, Economics, Sociology, Psychology, Anthropology)

Math/Science (Algebra, Pre-Calculus, Calculus, Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Physics)

2. ENRICHED MAJOR AREA COURSES: Students must take at least two enriched courses in their major for honors credit. (The same course cannot be counted in the enriched core courses section.)

3. HONORS SEMINARS: Students must take at least four one-hour seminars; two seminars per year will be offered.

4. SENIOR PROJECT/THESIS: The product of a senior honors seminar, this will include a written abstract of the work and an oral presentation.

5. STUDY ABROAD: The UHP will encourage students and assist students in seeking financial aid for summer and regular terms abroad.

6. SERVICE LEARNING PROJECT: Students must participate in a service activity a minimum of six hours per semester for six semesters.

LEARNING SUPPORT PROGRAMS

English, Reading and Mathematics; Supplemental Instruction/Peer Tutoring, Academic Assistance; and Regents' Remediation

Coordinator: G. Jones

General Information

I. The Learning Support Program

The Learning Support Program is a Regents' mandated program and is thus part of the University System of Georgia Learning Support Programs. The purpose of the Program is to allow a limited number of students who otherwise would not have the opportunity for university admission to enter GSW State University and to overcome deficiencies in the basic skills of reading, writing, and mathematics in order to make them eligible for university entrance.

Another way to look at the program is that Learning Support is a prerequisite for all of the programs at Georgia Southwestern. That is, students entering any program that requires English 1101 and Math 1111 must meet the Learning Support requirement. There are two ways in which students meet the requirement:

1. They present SAT scores or ACT scores at or above acceptable admission standards.

2. If students present SAT scores or ACT scores below acceptable admission standards in either area, they are required to go through further testing for possible placement in Learning Support courses or Academic Assistance courses. They must take the Compass Placement Examination (CPE) IN ALL PARTS (reading, English, and mathematics). If they meet the cut-off scores in all areas, they are reclassified as regular students.

II. Placement in the Learning Support Program

Four categories of students MUST take the CPE for possible placement in Learning Support courses:

A. Students who present SAT or ACT scores below acceptable admission standards;

B. Nontraditional students who do not present SAT or ACT scores or whose scores are below acceptable admission standards;

C. Students who are entering 2-year career programs and do not present SAT or ACT scores above acceptable admission standards;

D. International students who must test in the mathematics area only.

If these students do not make the cut-off score in any one of the areas, they are required to register for Learning Support courses in that area or those areas. They spend at least one semester working in the content area(s). Students must complete all requirements in Learning Support in a maximum of three semesters.

III. Exit from the Learning Support Program

In order to exit from a Learning Support skills course, students are required (1) to complete clearly defined course objectives and (2) to demonstrate their proficiency in the particular skill by performing satisfactorily on the Compass Exit Examination. Once they have met these conditions, the students are allowed to register for courses for academic credit in that area. In order to exit from the Learning Support Program and be reclassified, students must have met these two conditions for each required course and satisfactorily passed UNIV 1000.

IV. Suspension from the Learning Support Program

If a student does not complete the requirements for an area and pass the exit test in that area in three semesters, the student will be suspended. The student may not be considered for readmission within three years of suspension.

Prior to suspending a student who has not exited an area of Learning Support, GSW may allow the student to appeal for one additional course. The student must

1. Be individually evaluated and determined to have a reasonable chance of success;

2. Be in an exit-level course;

3. Have reached the limit in only one Developmental Studies area.

If granted the additional course, the student may enroll in only the Developmental Studies course.

V. Supplemental Instruction/Peer Tutoring

Supplemental Instruction/Peer Tutoring is available for all students in core courses, introductory courses, and some upper division

courses. The tutors are approved by faculty teaching the courses and are trained and supervised by the Academic Skills Center coordinator.

VI. Learning Support Programs offer Academic Assistance in a number of courses:

Reading 1000, a co-curricular course in Learning Support to be taken with a core course (see course description under Learning Support)

Mathematics 0999, an intermediate algebra course for students who need a review before College Algebra (see course description under Mathematics)

Academic Skills 1100, a course designed to help students develop and strengthen essential study skills required for college success (see course description under Arts and Sciences)

SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Dean:

The School of Arts and Sciences provides a general, liberal arts, core education at Georgia Southwestern State University. All students at Southwestern will study in this school in order to receive the broadening educational experience necessary for the academic development of all college students. Many students will choose to major in one of the curriculum which this school administers; others will declare a major in the School of Business Administration, Computer and Applied Sciences, Education, or Nursing. However, the classroom educational experience common to all Southwestern students will be received within the School of Arts and Sciences.

In addition to teaching the courses required in the core curricula, the School of Arts and Sciences offers degree programs leading to the Associate of Applied Science, Bachelor of Science, the Bachelor of Arts, and the Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in several areas. Students who plan to teach at the secondary level will also concentrate in disciplines administered by various departments in the School of Arts and Sciences and will be assigned an advisor within the department administering that discipline. The school is made up of the Departments of Biology; Chemistry; English and Foreign Languages; Fine Arts; Geology and Physics; History and Political Science; Mathematics; and Psychology and Sociology. Complete descriptions of the degree programs offered in this school and the requirements for completing each program are listed within the department sections which follow.

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCES

The Associate of Applied Science degree (A.A.S.) is designed to provide a technical and vocation trained student with a broad-based higher education in the arts and sciences. The joint degree has been approved by both the University System of Georgia Board of Regents and the Georgia Department of Education.

Through the cooperation of Georgia Southwestern State University and approved area technical colleges, this program serves to improve the student's educational and career aspirations. It meets the challenging education needs of today's students and also the changing needs of modern business and industry.

Students who meet the program requirements at both institutions will receive a diploma from the approved technical college and an Associate of Applied Science degree at Georgia Southwestern State University.

Students who apply for this joint degree program must meet the admissions requirements of the approved technical college. Students must also meet the regular admissions requirements at Georgia Southwestern State University.

The SAT or ACT scores necessary for admission to GSW are required of all students who graduated from high school within the last five years. Students who did not graduate in the last five years or who are 25 years or older must provide these SAT or ACT scores or take the Compass Placement Test for possible placement in the Learning Support Program.

The sixteen-unit distribution of College Preparatory Curriculum in high school is also required of students who graduated from high school within the last two years.

The Associate of Applied Science degree is offered in several areas including the following:

Accounting, Advanced Air Conditioning Technology, Advanced Drafting, Advanced Machine Tool Technology, Advanced Welding, Air Conditioning Technology, Aircraft Assembler, Aircraft Structural Technology, Automated Manufacturing Technology, Automotive Collision Repair, Automotive Fundamentals, Automotive Technology, Aviation Maintenance Technology, Avionics Maintenance Technology, Business and Office Technology, Certified Manufacturing Specialist, Commercial Truck Driving, Computer Information Systems, Cosmetology, Culinary Arts, Dental Assisting, Diesel Mechanics, Drafting, Early Childhood Care and Education, Electrical Construction and Maintenance, Electronics Fundamentals, Electronics Technology, Environmental Horticulture, Forestry Technology, Heavy Equipment Mechanics, Hotel/Restaurant/Travel Management, Industrial Electrical Technology, Industrial Maintenance, Industrial Maintenance Technology, Information Office Technology, Law Enforcement, Machine Tool Technology, Management and Supervisory Development, Marketing Management, Medical Assisting, Practical Nursing, Printing and Graphics Technology, Radiologic Technology, Surgical Technology and Welding and Joining Technology.

The Associate of Applied Science degree is not designed for transfer to other institutions. Courses are considered for transfer on a course by course basis.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

Chair: Herrington

Faculty: Brown, Harvey, Herrington, Kopec, Wright

The study of biology at Georgia Southwestern State University is intended to provide the student with a broad base in biological science rather than specialized expertise in one narrow discipline. It is possible to direct one's study toward an interest in some area such as botany, zoology, environment, or physiology. Study of biology not only provides the student with basic knowledge but also teaches scientific methodology that aids the thinking process of any professional activity. The insights developed through this study successfully prepare the student to enter many fields of employment in addition to traditional biology. The appreciation of the life sciences in general and the application of the usefulness of such study are the main objectives of this Department.

The biology major prepares the student for advanced study, as well as for employment in a biology related field, upon graduation. The student wishing to conclude formal education with the bachelor's degree in biology may find a career with State or Federal governments in health, natural resources and environment, agriculture, or education. Opportunities in the private sector exist in the food and beverage industry, health and pharmaceutical industry, environmental firms, nuclear power plants, and agricultural industry.

The student who wishes to continue study beyond the undergraduate degree may do so in graduate schools or in health professional schools such as medicine, dentistry, or related areas. The biology major is an ideal path for the pre-veterinary medicine student. Many opportunities exist for qualified graduates to undertake graduate level study in the biological sciences.

To earn a minor in biology, the student should complete 18 hours of upper division biology. Biology 2108 is prerequisite to upper division biology courses; however, in the case of a minor, Biology 2030 and 2040 (Anatomy and Physiology I & II) may be used as prerequisites. Biochemistry (CHEM 4410 plus CHEM 4410L) may be substituted for one of the biology courses.

It is important that students wishing to be admitted to professional programs know that these programs may include courses in addition to those required for graduation with BS degree. It is most important that these students confer with their advisor.

Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Biology

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Biology with Teacher Certification

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Biology Minor requirements

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Professional and Allied Health Care Programs

Students wishing to enter one of the various health care professions, other than nursing or pharmacy, may meet the entrance requirements through the Department of Biology. Pre-Medical, Pre-Dentistry, and Pre-Veterinary Medicine students often follow the B.S. in biology program selecting courses to meet entrance requirements. Students interested in allied health programs may choose to meet entrance requirements by proper course selection under guidance from a departmental advisor. Students must meet the competitive requirements determined by the professional institutions for admission to the programs.

Allied health programs include, but are not limited to, the following: physical therapy, medical technology, physician assistant, and occupational therapy. Students desiring to enter one of these professions should become aware of necessary program admissions requirements through discussions with the allied health advisor on campus and by contacting the professional schools offering the programs. The student must gain admission to the professional program. Therefore, the student needs to work to be competitive and meet admissions requirements. University System of Georgia units offering programs in the allied health sciences include the Medical College of Georgia, Georgia State University, Armstrong Atlantic State University, Columbus State University, and North Georgia College and State University.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

Chair: Wysochansky

Faculty: Gurnack, Smith, Thomas, Wysochansky

The study of chemistry forms the basis for employment in a variety of industrial, governmental and other business positions. It is a challenging but rewarding discipline that prepares the student to continue in a life-long learning experience while working in positions that are interesting and productive. B. S. Chemistry majors may find employment in chemical manufacturing, process control, chemical analysis, in management, sales and in regulatory positions. Majors in chemistry may pursue further degrees in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and other health-related professions. Advanced degrees in the various specialized areas of chemistry may be pursued by those with superior ability and interests. The chemistry major at Georgia Southwestern State University is flexible. Through the choice of a minor and elective courses, the student may prepare for almost any professional goal and find that the logical and analytical skills developed will be strong assets in any chosen career.

Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Chemistry

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Chemistry with Teacher Certification

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Chemistry Minor requirements

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LEARNING SUPPORT PROGRAMS

Chair: Jones, G.

Faculty: Anderson, Davis, DeStefano, Ellington, Johnson, G. Jones, L. Jones, Kuipers, K. Lawson, Moore, Odio,  Stauf, Waldrop, Wheeler, Willis

"The reading of all good books is like a conversation with the finest people of past centuries." Descartes.

The communication skills needed to succeed in any field of endeavor are central to every program in English and Foreign Languages. The study of literature and language helps us to develop a cultural framework within which we can view ourselves and our social conditions.

Through the study of literature and the practice of writing, students develop skills of discrimination and judgment which will enable them to grasp new concepts, to analyze arguments, and to adapt to new situations. A major in English is recommended as a pre-professional degree for those who wish to enter graduate school not only in English but law, theology, journalism, psychology, or library science. A bachelor's degree in English is also ideal for many entry level positions in advertising, publishing, journalism, personnel work, public relations, management, banking, social work, government service, as well as trainee positions in business and industry. A minor in a supporting area further prepares students for their chosen professional careers.

Although the study of foreign languages has always been important, it is becoming more essential. Communication and commerce are increasingly international in nature. Thus, knowledge of a modern foreign language plays a practical role in our society. A foreign language also opens us up to new cultures and values, allowing us to view a world different from our own.

Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Major in English

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Major in English With Teacher Certification

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Bachelor of Arts in English/Professional Writing Option

A recent survey indicates that most college graduates, whatever profession they enter, can expect to spend an average of nine hours out of forty writing. Clearly, a strong background in English is appropriate to every career-oriented graduate. The Bachelor of Arts in English with a Professional Writing Option provides a strong background in literature and composition as well as a good foundation in professional writing. Graduates from this program should be particularly well prepared for positions in advertising, copy writing, editing, public information, and other areas which require good writing skills.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

General

A grade of C or higher is required of all students for satisfactory completion of ENGL 1101 and 1102. Satisfactory completion of both courses is a prerequisite for enrollment in ENGL 2110, ENGL 2120, OR ENGL 2130 in Core Area C. For English majors a grade of C or higher is required in each course in the major.

Minor Programs

Minors in English and English Minor/Professional Writing

In recent years, there has been an increasing awareness of the importance of communication skills in every area of endeavor. Responding to the growing demand for effective communications, the department has established minor fields of study in English and professional writing. These minors complement a variety of majors in business, technical, social service, and teaching fields. Moreover, by enhancing a student's communication and analytical skills, these minors give the student an added edge in career choice.

Each Department minor requires a minimum of 18 hours and each course must be completed with a grade of C or better.

English Minor:

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

English Minor/Professional Writing Option:

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

With increasing trade among countries, competency in a second language can be a key factor in the successful attainment of a position in business, public relations, commerce, or government. The Department offers minors in both French and Spanish, two major international languages.

Minors in French and Spanish

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements (French).

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements (Spanish).

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS

Chair: Megginson

Faculty: Beazley, Green, Lawson, Megginson, Robinson, Spaniol, Wells

One of the age old traditional marks of an educated person has been that person's knowledge and appreciation of the arts. Fine arts provide the ultimate in the expression of human emotion and afford enjoyable and enriching experiences for all human beings. Through the intellectual pursuit of the media of the visual arts, music and theatre, Georgia Southwestern offers the opportunity for all students to develop a better understanding of the Arts and pursue successful careers in the related areas. B.A. degrees in Art, Music, Dramatic Arts; and the B.F.A. degree in Art. Any student at the University may also minor in Art, Music and Theatre by earning 18 hours of credit within the chosen discipline. Minor requirements should be planned in conjunction with the appropriate coordinator of Art, Music or Theatre the student's academic advisor.

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN ART

The BFA degree provides an intensive background in the practice, theory, and history of Visual Arts. Professional level training and concentration in art are offered to the student within the content of the baccalaureate degree. The program is designed in the belief that it is sound critical thinking as well as talent or skill that form the basis of the production of art. Problem solving, frequent critiques, and student responsibility for reasoned explication of his or her work will form an important part of the educational process. After a demonstration of competence in the foundation areas of drawing and design, the student will begin to become familiar with a wide range of materials and media to eventually concentrate in a particular area (drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics, photography, sculpture, glassblowing, and graphic/computer design) at the upper division level. Competence at this level is demonstrated by successful participation in a required senior exhibition and a written thesis.

Requirements for the BFA degree:

BFA students are to participate in a Sophomore Review and a Senior Exhibition as part of department requirements . All transfer students must submit a portfolio upon entering the program. The student will present at least one acceptable example of work for a permanent gallery collection.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN ART

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in Art in Studio and Art History is for students interested in studio, gallery, or museum work and in continuing their education in graduate school with the objectives of college teaching. Examples are a major in Art/Photo Journalism with a minor in Journalism, a major in Art/Computer Graphics with minor in Business Management or Advertising. The student may elect to concentrate in Graphic Design, Ceramics, Drawing and Painting, Glassblowing, Sculpture, Photography, and Printmaking while at the same time minor in an area of the student's choice.

Bachelor of Arts Requirements:

The BA students are to participate in a Sophomore Review and a Senior Exhibition as part of department requirements. All transfer students must submit a portfolio upon entering the program. The student will present at least one acceptable example of work for a permanent gallery collection.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements (BA Arts). Recommended four year plan.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements (BA Arts with Teacher Certification).

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN MUSIC

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in music degree offers the student a humanities oriented degree with a concentration in Music. Besides stressing a liberal arts foundation, the degree will allow considerable flexibility in selecting electives, languages, and a minor.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements (BA Music). Recommended four year plan.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements (BA Music with Teacher Certification).

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN DRAMATIC ARTS

The Dramatic Arts program provides students an interdisciplinary approach to the study of performance as an aesthetic act, a fundamental form of human communicative behavior, and a means to cultural understanding. With related course offerings in fields of theatre and communication arts, the distinctive characteristic of the program is an integral focus on performance as a primary means of interaction and transaction by the individuals in everyday life, and artistic expression on stage and on camera.

A premise of the program is that the study of communication and theatre as liberal arts serves as a viable foundation for entry into a wide range of professions and occupations. On the broadest level, students with this educational background have gone on to successful careers in fields as varied as banking, law, real estate, management and sales, human resources, training and development. More specifically, the entertainment industry is one of the leading exports of this country. This degree program serves as a gateway degree into that industry. In the most specific application the studio work of the program provides rigorous performance training to prepare students for admission to the best graduate programs in the country.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements. Recommended four year plan.

COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE ARTS

The Communication and Theatre Arts program area provides students an interdisciplinary approach to the study of performance as both an aesthetic act and a fundamental form of human communicative behavior and cultural understanding. With related course offerings in fields of theatre and communication arts, the distinctive characteristic of the program is an integral focus on performance as a primary means of interaction by individuals in everyday life and artistic expression on stage or on camera.

The premise of the program is that the study of communication and theatre as liberal arts serves as a viable foundation for entry into a wide range of professions and occupations. A basic philosophy of the program is that a broad-based education in the liberal arts is best for the development of the whole person and preferable for most students at the undergraduate level.

Dramatic Arts Minor requirements

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Music Minor requirements

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Art Minor requirements

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND PHYSICS

Chair: Askren

Faculty: Askren, Carter, Dieters, Peavy, Weiland

The scientific study of the Earth gains greater importance as resources dwindle and human population increases. The geoscience community deals with the problems of energy, mineral resources, and natural hazards, as well as the more purely intellectual subjects of Earth's origin and evolution and the development of life on this planet. To cope with the dynamic Earth, we must first understand it. Thus, the primary goal of the Department is to provide majors with a firm background in all phases of the geosciences which will prepare them for either graduate studies or individual careers.

Physics, the study of natural phenomena, is the most fundamental discipline of all the sciences. The study of this subject prepares students for science and engineering careers or any career whose interests range from classifying quarks to contemplating what lies just beyond the visible edge of the universe. The adventure begins with a thorough foundation in the heart of the physical world which includes mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, and thermodynamics.

B. S. IN GEOLOGY

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

GEOLOGY MINOR REQUIREMENTS

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

17 hours total with at least 9 hours in upper division courses.
*Denotes upper division courses.

Admission into the Geology Minor program must be approved by the Department Chair.

DUAL-DEGREE PROGRAM

Career Opportunities

Industry, private engineering consulting practice, and governmental agencies are looking for the technologically educated person who has the broad overview that the Dual Degree Program provides. Past participants in the program enthusiastically endorse the concept and are pleased that they took the fifth year to complete requirements for the two degrees (one from Georgia Southwestern State University and one from Georgia Tech).

Success in the many and diversified fields of engineering requires excellence in mathematics, science, computer technology, and verbal skills. Many students may be deficient in one or more of these areas. Students frequently need time to acclimatize to the demands of the university experience. Georgia Southwestern State University offers the advantages of time to become aware of university life, a faculty with the experience necessary to correct deficiencies which a student may encounter in preparing for study in an engineering field, and the environment to develop other important areas of one's life such as awareness of others. The curriculum at Georgia Southwestern State University is worked out individually by the Dual-Degree Program advisor, depending on the desired engineering field and the developmental stage of each student.

Program Description

Georgia Southwestern State University offers a dual-degree program of study jointly with the Engineering School at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The Dual-Degree Program allows a student to study for three years at Georgia Southwestern State University, followed by two years of study in an engineering field of the student's choice at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The successful student in this program is awarded a bachelor of science degree in mathematics or a science area relevant to the chosen engineering field and a degree from Georgia Tech.

Today, the decisions of the engineer, the scientist, and the industrial manager have an important effect on the lives of all mankind. It is evident more than ever before that these professionals should acquire a full measure of general knowledge and culture. The Dual Degree Program provides its participants with the best of two university experiences. First, they have a choice of study at a liberal arts college with outstanding programs in humanities, natural sciences, philosophy, social sciences, fine arts, economics and business, modern languages, etc. Secondly, the Dual Degree students study at one of the world's leading technological institutes which has a proven record of graduating leading engineers, scientists, managers, and architects.

Dual Degree candidates from Georgia Southwestern State University are eligible to seek any of the following degrees from Georgia Tech:

College of Engineering:

Bachelor of Aerospace Engineering
Bachelor of Ceramic Engineering
Bachelor of Civil Engineering
Bachelor of Electrical Engineering
Bachelor of Engineering Science and Mechanics
Bachelor of Industrial Engineering
Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering
Bachelor of Nuclear Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Textile Sciences & Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Textiles
Bachelor of Textile Engineering

College of Management:

Bachelor of Science in Economics
Bachelor of Science in Management Science

College of Sciences and Liberal Studies:

Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics
Bachelor of Science in Applied Physics
Bachelor of Science in Physics

Courses Which Are to Be Part of the Study Program at Georgia Southwestern State University

As of this date, the following amount of course credits in the specified areas must be included in the three-year study program taken at Georgia Southwestern State University. For descriptions of courses and minimum course content, refer to the current Georgia Tech catalog. If Georgia Southwestern State University cannot offer all of the required courses or if the student is unable to schedule one or two of the courses, Georgia Southwestern State University agrees to allow transfer credit applicable toward the Georgia Southwestern State University degree for such courses taken at Georgia Tech.

1. The mathematics and science courses included in the freshman and sophomore years of the curriculum for the discipline in which the student plans to major at Georgia Tech.
2. At least half of the humanities and social science/modern language credit hours required at Georgia Tech. At this time, twelve (12) semester hours of humanities and twelve (12) semester hours of social science/modern language are required for all Georgia Tech degrees.

Requirements for Approval for Degree-seeking Status as a Dual Degree Student at Georgia Institute of Technology

In order for a student to become a Dual Degree candidate at Georgia Tech he/she must have:

1. Completed 90 to 96 semester hours at Georgia Southwestern State University. The student shall not be admitted to Georgia Tech with full third-year standing until this requirement is met.
2. A recommendation from the designated official at Georgia Southwestern State University (dual-degree advisor).
3. University grades and tests results which would indicate that he or she could satisfactorily complete the degree requirements at Georgia Tech.

Hours of Course Credit to Be Required at the Georgia Institute of Technology for the Designated Bachelor's Degree

The Dual-Degree Program student will be required to complete a Georgia Tech program of study which equals the number of credit hours required of normal juniors and seniors enrolled in the standard curriculum for the particular degree being sought.

If the official study program at Georgia Tech for the Dual Degree candidate includes free electives and the candidate has excess hours of credit at Georgia Southwestern State University, he or she may use these excess hours to reduce the hours required at Georgia Tech. Such a reduction shall not cause the total number of hours taken at Georgia Tech to be less than 60 semester hours.

Student Readmission

Students who attend Georgia Institute of Technology but do not complete degree requirements will be readmitted to GSW and given an opportunity to complete the requirements for a degree.

Rejection of Students

Any student who would not otherwise be admitted to Georgia Institute of Technology under their admissions evaluation criteria or who is projected not to complete any program contained in the Dual-Degree Program may, after suitable consideration by Georgia Tech, be declined admission to Georgia Tech. However, any student who meets Georgia Tech freshman admission criteria in effect when the student enters Georgia Southwestern State University, provided that he or she maintains an academic record that indicates a high probability for success at Georgia Tech during the three years of study at Georgia Southwestern State University and completes the courses stipulated in the agreement between Georgia Southwestern State University and Georgia Tech, will be admitted to Georgia Tech.

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE

Chair: Hall

Faculty: Bagwell, Cooper, Galatas, Hall, Isaacs, Kline, Robins, Szmedra

The disciplines in the Department of History and Political Science focus on humanity in action and in thought as well as humanity's relationship to the earth and the allocation of its resources, historically, at present, and in the future. The general study of these fields provides that broad base which is essential for effective functioning in humanistic areas. Specialized study in specific social science areas may lead to careers in teaching, governmental services, public information, business, the legal profession, or simply provide the broad based liberal arts education fundamental to a fuller understanding of life, whatever the specific career choice.

The Department accepts the particular challenge of promoting awareness of our cultural heritage and the responsibilities of citizenship within a democratic society and the world community. The Department encourages self-realization, intellectual inquiry, and the examination of personal and professional values. The activities of the Department also encourage the discovery and study of those societal needs which may be effectively addressed in an academic setting.

History and political science graduates are employed in a variety of positions in public service and the private sector. History majors find positions with research services, in editing, legislative analysis, trend analysis for media, public relations, government agencies or non-profit groups, site interpretation and management, historic preservation, oral histories, and the development of documentaries. Political science majors find careers as legislative aides, legal assistants, lobbyists, or in government service, law, interest groups, public relations, law enforcement, teaching, community service, state department, and foreign service.

With a variety of programs, open minors, and electives, students can tailor their individual programs to fit personal career goals. The Department has an active Third World Studies program which includes enrichment seminars. It also administers the Intern Program which includes a variety of internships. These programs enable qualified students to obtain valuable work experience in addition to college credit and a possible stipend. A Pre-Law advisor helps students prepare for the law school of their choice. (See "Pre-Law Advisor" below.)

Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Major in History

This program offers a strong major, opportunity for complementary work in a minor, and a foreign language requirement. It is a good background for graduate/law/divinity school or preparation for careers which require breadth of knowledge and informed perspective (as journalism, public relations, etc.), as well as those which draw more directly on the major field (as research/analysis services, historic site management, etc.). It enables students to develop writing and analytical skills useful in business and professional careers.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in History

Similar to the B.A. above, this degree also has a strong major and opportunity for a minor, but it offers wider elective choices by reduction of the foreign language requirement. Again, similarly to the B.A., the B.S. in History is an appropriate background for graduate/law/divinity school, careers which require a knowledgeable perspective (as journalism, public relations, etc.), and careers more directly related to history (as research/analysis services, historic site management, etc.). Students develop writing and analytical skills useful in business and professional careers.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Major in Political Science

This degree offers a strong major, opportunity for a complementary minor, and a foreign language requirement. It is appropriate as preparation for graduate/law school or as a foundation for careers which require the breadth and perspective of a liberal arts degree (as journalism, public relations, etc.). Some careers (as legislative aide or in political action, community service, etc.) relate more directly to the major field. Students develop writing and analytical skills useful in business and professional careers.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Political Science

Similar to the B.A., this B.S. program has a strong major, and opportunity for a minor, but it offers a wider elective option through the elimination of the foreign language requirement. It is also an appropriate preparation for graduate school and especially for law school. It provides the background for careers which need the informed perspective of a liberal arts degree (as journalism, public relations, etc.). It is a more direct preparation for career fields which draw more directly on the major field (as legislative aide, political action, community service, etc.). Students develop writing and analytical skills useful in business and professional careers.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Teacher Certification Programs

For information on degree programs leading to secondary level teacher certification in history, see the following curriculum described also under the School of Education: B.S. in History with Teacher Certification.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Minor Programs

The Department of History and Political Science provides excellent minor programs in history and political science. In preparation for a career in business, governmental agencies, or education, minors in the social sciences are considered an especially attractive balance to the career major. Minor courses are selected in consultation with the student's faculty advisor.

Each minor course must be completed with a grade of C or better. Exceptions and substitutions for the required courses or types of course may be made (for example, for prior credit) with the recommendation of the advisor and the approval of the Department Chair.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements (History).
Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements (Political Science).

Pre-Law Advisor

Since law schools prescribe no set curriculum as a prerequisite for admission, students may major in almost any degree program in preparation for law school. Some curricula are particularly recommended, such as political science, history, English, etc. Each of these curricula will have a separate advisor. However, the student interested in law school should also consult with the "Pre-law Advisor" within the Department of History and Political Science. The Pre-law Advisor will have information on law school admission policies, Law School Aptitude Test applications and administration dates, scholarships, law school catalogs, etc.

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS

Chair: Stroyls

Faculty: Cliett, Hodges, Mueller, Sapko, Stroyls

Georgia Southwestern offers its students two degree options in Mathematics at the undergraduate level-the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics, the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics with option in Industrial Mathematics.

Former Georgia Southwestern students who have completed degree programs offered by the Department of Mathematics are presently pursuing careers in teaching, banking, business, computer science, industrial research, actuarial science, insurance, and civil service. The mathematics programs at Georgia Southwestern prepare students to enter these and other related fields. Graduates in mathematics are also, by program design, well equipped to enter graduate programs in these areas.

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics with Teacher Certification

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics with option in Industrial Mathematics

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Mathematics Minor requirements

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY and SOCIOLOGY

Chair: Johnson

Faculty: Cotter, Fisk, Johnson, Prewett, Shapiro, Talley, Urda, Vance, Worthy

The Department of Psychology and Sociology offers coursework and laboratory experience in the behavioral sciences. Its curricula are designed to prepare students for graduate work in psychology and sociology, and to provide students with skills and training for employment in various kinds of social service occupations. A balanced offering of lecture, laboratory, and field experience provides the student with a basic understanding of those variables affecting individual behavior as well as the behavior of groups.

The Department administers the following degree programs: B.A. in Psychology, B.S. in Psychology, B.S. in Sociology, and the Master of Science in Administration (Social Administration Concentration). The department also offers minors in Psychology and Sociology. See the Chair of the Department of Psychology and Sociology if interested in these minor programs.

Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Psychology

The B.S. degree in Psychology is designed to introduce the students to the scientific evaluation of psychological theory and to familiarize them with the application of fundamental principles of behavior. It will provide a broad background for those who desire to pursue an advanced degree in the behavioral sciences or those who aspire to a career in social service.

The major professional opportunities for a person in the B.S. degree program in Psychology are to be found in social service areas of the public sector. Many students with this degree find employment with the State Department of Family & Children Services, the Department of Offender Rehabilitation, Juvenile Courts, and various mental health/mental retardation agencies operated by the State Department of Human Resources. Other opportunities exist with federal agencies such as the Department of Labor and Social Security. Particular job titles with these agencies include Social Work Technician, Social Worker, Pension Counselor, Behavioral Specialist, Mental Health Technician, Counselor, and Probation Officer.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Major in Psychology

This curriculum is designed to provide a research oriented background in Psychology for individuals who wish to pursue graduate study in Behavioral Science. The Southwestern student interested in pursuing a professional degree (Masters or Doctorate in Psychology, Criminology, Counseling, or Child Development) is encouraged to enroll in this degree program. A wide variety of career opportunities in social service delivery agencies is available to students holding advanced degrees in Behavioral Science. A student wishing to teach Psychology at the post-secondary level would also need an advanced degree, and this curriculum is an appropriate preparation for graduate study.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Sociology

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Sociology is designed to familiarize the student with the structure and functioning of society, to develop greater understanding and appreciation of diverse cultural groups, to stimulate constructive analysis of sociological patterns, to encourage further research on human social behavior, and to prepare students for productive careers in a wide variety of occupations and professions. Sociology is the study of social life and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. It investigates the structure of groups, organizations, and societies, as well as their formation, development, and interactions. Since all human behavior is social, the subject matter of sociology ranges from the intimate family to the hostile mob, from crime to religion, from the divisions of race, gender, and social class to the shared beliefs of a common culture, from the sociology of work to the sociology of sport. In fact, few fields have such broad scope and relevance.

Various occupations and professions are available at the local, state and national levels to the person who majors in sociology. Many of the agencies affiliated with the Georgia Department of Human Resources, such as the Department of Family and Children Services and the Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation, employ social service personnel. Other positions exist in state agencies dealing with juvenile and adult offenders. Local agencies and organizations requiring social service personnel include the Council on Aging, the Sumter Regional Hospital, Magnolia Manor Retirement Center, and the Rosalynn Carter Institute. While many sociologists hold positions in social service and educational fields, an increasing number hold a wide variety of jobs in such sectors as business, the health professions, the criminal justice system, and in government.

Nationally, sociologists are commonly employed by governmental agencies such as the National Science Foundation, the National Academy of Sciences, the Bureau of the Census, the National Institutes of Health, Education, and Welfare, the Departments of Agriculture, Housing and Urban Development, Defense, Commerce, and many others. Sociologists also direct, advise, and review research sponsored by foundations such as Russell Sage, Carnegie, and Ford, and likewise they work with business, technology, and industry.

Sociologists also teach at the community college, college, and university levels, as well as increasingly at high school levels across the nation. Preparation for graduate school is, of course, an integral part of the individual student's program.

And yet, career payoffs are not the only reason for studying sociology. Its subject matter holds considerable interest for its own sake. Certainly sociology offers valuable preparation for other sorts of careers. Sociology is a popular major for students planning futures in such professions as law, business, education, architecture, medicine, social work, and public administration.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Sociology Minor requirements

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Psychology Minor requirements

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Dean: Kooti

Faculty: Belk, Chen-Lin, Fathi, Howell, Kooti, Madden, Morris, Parks,  WilsonHeshizer, Talukdar, Grimes, Stanfield.

The School of Business Administration is in its third year of Candidacy for accreditation by AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. AACSB International is located at 600 Emerson Road, Suite 300, St. Louis, MO. 63141-6762 USA, telephone number 314-872-8481, and fax number 314-872-8495.

The School of Business Administration has initial accreditation from the International Association of Collegiate Business Education, PO Box 25217, Overland Park, KS 66225, USA, telephone number is: 913-631-3009, the fax number is: 913-613-9154. The School of Business Administration is also a member of the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). The Association is located at 7007 College Boulevard, Suite 420, Overland, KS 66211, USA, telephone number 913-339-9356, and fax number 913-339-6226.

The School of Business offers the following programs:

The Master of Business Administration degree program is designed to prepare future business leaders for the constantly changing world marketplace by developing their critical thinking, management and leadership skills and the global perspectives necessary for success.

The Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting is designed to prepare students for the numerous types of positions available in the accounting field. The program emphasizes the broad-based learning that is required to be successful in this field. The Accounting program includes course requirements to qualify for the CPA examination.

The Bachelor of Business Administration in Management with a concentration in Human Resource Management has been designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills needed for successful entry into Human Resource Management  positions. The program prepares students to enter into careers such as health and safety administration, recruiting and training.

The Bachelor of Business Administration in Management is designed to give students objective knowledge and skills development in the major functional areas of management: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. The Management concentration allows the graduate flexibility in career opportunities, and is an excellent choice for the individual who may want to start his or her own business.

The Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing is designed to stress the importance of creating and maintaining successful relationships with customers. Upon completion of this program, the students will be prepared to begin careers in sales, advertising, planning or self-employment.

The Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) in Technology Management is a unique program designed to prepare students for the effective management of technologies by combining courses from business and computer information science. The program intends to prepare technology entry level and mid-level managers within industry and government organizations. The program incorporates academic and applied state-of-the-art orientations by utilizing resources from the School of Business Administration and the School of Computer and Information Sciences.

  • Coursework taken in two-year college technical programs is generally non-transferable. Technical courses may be considered as a component of a portfolio by the Prior Learning Portfolio Committee.
  • Students requesting credit for prior learning experiences in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Technology Management must submit the following documents to the BAS in Technology Management Advisor for consideration:
    1. A narrative explaining how prior learning is related to technology management. The narrative must describe relative experience and evidence identifying the learning the student acquired and how the learning can be used to solve problems or generalized for use in other situations.
    2. Documentation that the student has actually acquired the learning related to technology.
    3. Documentation to show that the prior learning experience is equivalent to the number of credit hours requested.
  • Coursework taken at two-year Technical Colleges which are accredited through the Commission on Colleges will be considered in transfer if the course numbering is 190 or above. Technical Colleges accredited through an agency other than the Commission on Colleges will not be accepted in transfer, regardless of the course numbering.

OFF CAMPUS PROGRAMS

The School of Business Administration offers the BBA degree program in Accounting and Management on the campus of Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College (ABAC).

CENTER FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The Center for Business and Economic Development is the umbrella organization for all outreach and service activities in the School of Business Administration. The Center conducts data collection and dissemination activities; performs applied research; provides technical support for business, government and economic development organizations; conducts seminars and short courses; and publishes reports and commentaries. The Center coordinates Georgia Southwestern State University's participation in Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE). SIFE is a national, college-based organization in which students develop and carry out projects and programs to enhance knowledge and understanding of the free enterprise system on the university campus, in area schools, and among the general population.

THE SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER (SBDC)

Georgia Southwestern State University Small Business Development Center is one of Georgia's SBDC Network of 19 Offices. As one of 19 SBDC Networks offices in the State of Georgia, the mission of the School of Business Administration Small Business Development Center is to enhance the economic well-being of Georgia citizens. Our objectives are:

  • To support the objectives of the Small Business Administration and the Small Business Development efforts of the people of the state of Georgia.
  • To support entrepreneurship and business expansion through the offering of direct business consulting and educational opportunities that address the human resources, management, technology, capital formation, and infrastructure needs of the business community.
  • To address regional economic development needs for information by providing applied economic development research to communities and regions. This service includes the application of geographic information system technology and offers a wide range of resources for secondary research and an extensive primary research effort.
  • To assist in the expansion of international trade primarily by educating new exporters who need assistance in all elements of exporting. The globalization of our economy demands that Georgia businesses take advantage of international opportunities.
  • To deliver in-house managerial and employee training targeted especially to businesses which have difficulty obtaining affordable training.
  • To facilitate the creation of economic development leadership groups that focus on the creation, retention, and expansion of business.
  • To provide special attention to the needs of minority entrepreneurs by identifying procurement opportunities, locating sources of capital, and supporting outreach efforts of historically black colleges and universities.
  • To assist existing businesses in taking advantage of state and local incentives for job creation, employee training, and other expansion efforts.

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE

The undergraduate program of the School of Business Administration is divided into lower and upper division units of study. Freshmen, sophomores, and transfer students who are admitted to the University to pursue the BBA degree are assigned to the lower unit (Pre-business) and are advised by faculty of the School. Upon completion of the general education portion (Area A through E) of the Core curriculum and the business preparation portion (Area F), business students "declare" a major field of study and are transferred to that curriculum. Students admitted into a specific major are advised by faculty in that subject area.

Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.
Accounting 
Accounting - ABAC 
Accounting - Bainbridge College 
Accounting - Middle Georgia College 
Human Resource Management 
Management 
Management - ABAC 
Management - Bainbridge College 
Management - Middle Georgia College 
Management - Waycross College 
Marketing

BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

BAS and BBA degree programs do not have minor fields of study. Minor fields of study in Business Administration may be pursued by students in other degree programs. Business Administration minors are available in accounting, management, human resource management, and marketing.

Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.
Human Resource Management
 
Human Resource Management for CIS 
Management 
Management for CIS 
Marketing 
Marketing for CIS 

SCHOOL OF COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES

Dean: Peltsverger

Faculty: Cook, Iwanska, Peltsverger, Shah, Yemelyanov

The impact of the computer upon business and society has been phenomenal. One result of this continuing dynamic technological growth has been a significant demand for professionals. The use of computers has become indispensable in science, engineering, management, education and other professions. Many believe that in the near future information processing will become the nation's largest industry and that its disciplines will be centrally important to society.

The faculty of the School of Computer and Information Sciences provide a diverse spectrum of expertise and experience. Students are therefore provided a unique blend of theory, current practice, and state-of-the-art technology.

The computer laboratories house PC's which are networked to Georgia Southwestern State University's in-house servers as well as to the University System's Computer Network. The full range of computer equipment, from PC's to large servers, is taught in the classroom and is accessed by students in the laboratory.

The GSW-I-TECH Center was created based within the School of Computer and Information Sciences in Fall 2000. The primary mission of the Center is to provide students with real-world projects and opportunities for research and internships. There were more than 15 projects completed in the last two years, among them were web based applications, database development, e-commerce application testing, etc.

More information can be found on the GSW-I-TECH Center website.

The School of Computer and Information Sciences offers Master of Science in Computer Science degree program and Bachelor of Science degree programs in computer information systems and computer science.

THE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

The Master of Science in Computer Science degree program has two options: Computer Science and Computer Information Systems.

This degree program was designed to serve two purposes:

  • as a "Professional" program to allow computer scientists in industry to upgrade their professional skills;
  • as an "Academic" program allowing capable computer scientists to prepare for the terminal degree.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS

The Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems provides instruction and training for persons wishing to enter the exciting world of Computer Information Systems. Today, employment opportunities abound for the man or woman who possesses the creative energy, the problem-solving ability, and the technical knowledge and skills to provide information services in a wide variety of organizational settings. The graduate of this program can expect initial employment as a network administrator, a database administrator, a webmaster, and, with some experience, can move into such high-demanding occupations as program analyst, information systems analyst, or information systems manager. The program provides the flexibility to meet almost any career aspirations in computers and information processing.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

The Computer Science curriculum, leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, is a liberal arts oriented curriculum intended to prepare students for careers in programming. Computer Science is a multifaceted discipline that encompasses a broad range of topics. Computer science focuses on the theoretical and applied capabilities of computers and on the properties of various general problems and algorithms.

ADMISSION GUIDELINES (for CS/CIS applicants)

(1) acceptance in good standing by the University;
(2) application to the School of Computer & Information Sciences by the published deadline;
(3) significant completion of the core (general education) courses;
(4) an overall grade point average of at least 2.5 on a scale of 4.0 for consideration; and
(5) results of validation testing, if required.

PROGRESSION REQUIREMENTS

(1) an overall grade point average of 2.2 on a scale of 4.0;
(2) a minimum grade of "C" in each major course;
(3) a student may repeat a major course once after failure to receive a passing grade. The student must apply for readmission. Readmission is not guaranteed; and
(4) the program must be completed within five years of the start of the first major course.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE in COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (120 Hrs)

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE in COMPUTER SCIENCE (120 Hrs)

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements for Computer Information Systems Minor.
Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements for Computer Science Minor.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Dean: Gendernalik-Cooper

Faculty: Barksdale, Davis, Dorminey, Foster,  Gendernalik-Cooper, Hawver, Hay, Haywood, Hunter, Johnson, Kolo, Mayo, McWhorter, Medders, Neale, Nichols, Rhodes, Spaniol, Spann, Stokes, Watford.

Mission Statement

The mission of the School of Education is the preparation and continuous development of candidates from diverse populations to high levels of achievement. The School of Education is committed to:

  • developing candidates who accurately assess, reflect, and make appropriate decisions about instruction resulting in achievement for all learners.
  • motivating life-long learning and offering high quality programs based upon exemplary instruction and relevant research.
  • collaborating with schools, businesses, communities, civic organizations, and others to improve the preparation of candidates and the effectiveness of practicing teachers.
  • developing leaders in education who are skilled, reflective decision makers and view pupil learning as the focus of their work.

Principles Guiding Curriculum Development

The School of Education faculty has identified five guiding principles for curriculum development:

1. Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions. The SOE faculty believes candidates should demonstrate content knowledge, effective pedagogical skills, and methodologies for teaching based on national, state, and local standards. Attitudes, beliefs, and dispositions about teaching must align with these standards. Faculty will model and teach candidates to use current technology to enhance and improve content and improve methodologies of teaching, thus, fostering pupil achievement.

2. Assessment and Reflective Evaluation. Faculty, administrators, and candidates will continually assess courses, clinical experiences, candidates' impact on pupil learning, and overall programs through reflection and evaluation to make skilled decisions and improve the education of all candidates and the achievement of all pupils.

3. Clinical Experiences/Field Experiences. The SOE faculty believes collaboration with faculty in the School of Arts and Sciences, faculty and support personnel in local education agencies throughout our service area, businesses, civic organizations, and other community resources are essential for exemplary programs.

4. Diversity. As change agents, faculty and candidates must adapt to the evolving needs of the global society and its diverse populations to provide exemplary learning and achievement opportunities for all pupils. Curriculum will reflect the current and ever-changing issues of diverse human needs.

5. Faculty Performance/Development. The SOE faculty models exemplary professional practices in teaching, service, and scholarship. Faculty members incorporate the standards of national and state agencies, the Board of Regents, INTASC, NBPTS, and professional organizations to achieve high levels of exemplary teaching, professionalism, and life-long learning.

Education as a Career

A career in education is multi-faceted. Teaching in public or private schools, teaching for industry, teaching abroad, human services positions in a variety of agencies, tutoring, and operating an educational clinic are some options available.

Teaching, wherever it occurs, offers challenge, personal satisfaction, interaction with individuals in diverse situations, congenial colleagues, good working conditions, opportunities for advancement, increased financial rewards, choices of location, and the professional and personal growth which accrues from advanced study in the college and university environment. The School of Education at Georgia Southwestern State University is comprised of professional educators with extensive experiences in the public schools, the community, and professional organizations.

The School of Education is nationally recognized for the quality of its preparation programs. Georgia Southwestern Teacher Education programs are fully accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (2010 Massachusetts Ave NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20036; 202-466-7496), state and regional accrediting agencies, as well as by specialty accrediting groups such as the National Council for the Teaching of Mathematics, the Middle School Association, and the Council for Exceptional Children.

The mission of the School of Education is the preparation of teachers for Georgia schools. Through cooperative efforts with other schools and departments of the University, the School of Education offers Teacher Education programs for Early Childhood, Middle Grades, Secondary Education, P-12 Education, Special Education, and Reading; provides leadership in developing in-service and extension programs for teachers within the area served by the University; and collaborates with the Georgia Professional Standards Commission, school systems, professional organizations, and other groups in evaluating and improving education programs and services.

Programs in Education at Georgia Southwestern

Teacher education programs represent the cooperative planning of the School of Education and the other major academic units of the University. All programs are under the overall coordination of the School of Education and are designed to produce teachers who demonstrate:

1. the skills and central concepts of their disciplines and the ability to incorporate those concepts into an integrated curriculum to facilitate holistic learning.
2. a knowledge of the growth and development characteristics of children and adolescents and a knowledge of content and critical historical, philosophical, and theoretical themes in education.
3. an ability to effectively instruct students from diverse populations who vary in rate, ability, compatibility, cultural background, and style of learning.
4. critical and reflective thinking skills and the ability to use a variety of instructional strategies to promote critical thinking, problem solving, and performance in pupils.
5. classroom management skills using various techniques including the ability to manage the physical classroom environment.
6. effective communication strategies to insure active participation of diverse learners.
7. the ability to make skilled, reflective decisions in planning, creating, and evaluating materials appropriate for effective instruction using a variety of teaching strategies and technologies.
8. effective assessment techniques for the purpose of diagnosing and prescribing teaching strategies resulting in high levels of pupil achievement.
9. professionalism and the knowledge and ability to use reflection, research, and inquiry to refine their own development and to support professional practice.
10. appropriate and effective collaboration, communication, and interpersonal skills with pupils, teachers, parents, administrators, and others in the community.
11. dispositions, including beliefs, values, and behaviors, that guide ethical practice.
12. integration of instructional technology to foster learning and high levels of pupil achievement.

The prospective student has many options. Programs leading to degrees and/or eligibility for initial certification are offered in Art, Biological Science, Chemistry, Early Childhood Education, English,  Health and Physical Education, History, Mathematics, Music, and Special Education. In addition, students may earn the Bachelor of Science in Education degree in Recreation and Exercise Science/Wellness, non-teaching degrees.

Employment Opportunities

Quality teachers are in demand in schools, business, industry, and education-related positions. Georgia and other states in the southern region offer attractive employment opportunities to teachers and graduates of education programs. Virtually every major field is open to education graduates seeking positions. Social and governmental agencies recruit education graduates. Corporations and banks seek those skilled in communications and human relations. The individual with a degree in education can select from a wide range of positions and opportunities.

The School of Education maintains a Teacher Placement Service for its graduates. Undergraduates are required to establish a placement file by the beginning of the student teaching semester. Placement forms are available from the School office.

The Teacher Career Fair, sponsored annually by the School, brings representatives from Georgia school systems to the campus to interview prospective graduates. Individual conferences are arranged to provide wide exposure for students to potential employment opportunities. Undergraduates participate in at least one Career Fair prior to graduation.

Basic Requirements for All Undergraduate Teacher Education Programs

Teacher Education programs at Georgia Southwestern State University are approved by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission. Successful completion of an approved Teacher Education program leads to recommendation for a professional teaching certificate. Since these professional programs lead to licensure, students must meet requirements and responsibilities not common to other degree programs.

Academic Achievement

All Teacher Education students must have a minimum GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale for Admission to Teacher Education, for Admission to Student Teaching, and for graduation. In addition, students must earn grades of C or better in the professional sequence and teaching field courses for their chosen field of study. (See individual program descriptions for professional sequences and teaching field courses). Professional course credit may not be earned by correspondence.

Field Experiences

The School of Education strongly believes that field experiences are essential elements in all preservice teacher education programs. The mission of field experience programs is to provide developmental, systematic, and authentic contact between Teacher Education students and the tasks involved in teaching P-12 pupils. Many courses have field experience requirements as an integral part of the course and/or as out-of-class requirements. Collaboration with area schools as professional partners enables students to observe and participate in classrooms beginning with the Introduction to Education or Foundations in Early Childhood Education course and continuing through the capstone field experience-Student Teaching. Students are expected to complete the equivalent of one-half year of field experience hours prior to student teaching.

Admission to Teacher Education Programs

All students following a Teacher Education program must be formally admitted to Teacher Education. The Admission to Teacher Education process is an advisement and tracking procedure designed to assist students in completion of degree requirements. Admission to Teacher Education is a prerequisite for admission into professional education courses. Failure to make application at the appropriate time can jeopardize timely program completion. Deadlines for submitting applications for Admission to Teacher Education are posted each semester.

Application for Admission to Teacher Education should be made upon completion of 36 semester hours of core curriculum credit. Transfer students with at least 36 semester hours of credit must make application for Admission to Teacher Education immediately upon entering the University. Application forms may be obtained from secretaries in the School of Education.

All applicants must submit the application and a two-page autobiography to the appropriate departmental office. A student admitted to the Teacher Education program will be notified by letter from the Chair of the department housing the appropriate program. Admission to Teacher Education must occur at least two semesters prior to the Student Teaching semester.

Formal Admission to the Teacher Education program will be granted to students meeting the following requirements:

1. Completion of EDUC 2010 or EDEC 2400 (for Early Childhood majors) with a grade of C or higher.
2. Completion of a minimum of 36 semester hours of General Core Curriculum (Areas A-F) credit with a minimum grade point average of 2.50 on all work taken whether at other colleges/universities or at Georgia Southwestern State University. Achievement and maintenance of a core GPA of at least 2.50 is required to be admitted and to remain in the program.
3. A cumulative/institution grade point average of 2.50 or higher in all program course work taken whether at other colleges/universities or at Georgia Southwestern State University is required to be admitted and to remain in the program.
4. Successful completion of the Regents Examination.
5. Successful completion of the PRAXIS I academic skills tests in Reading, Mathematics, and Writing.*
6. Proficiency in communication skills, which is subject to review by the School of Education at any time during the program. Communication skills are measured by completion of the Humanities component of the core with a GPA of 2.25 or higher and successful demonstration of proficiency in communication skills or completion of COMM 1110 or THEA 1110 with a grade of C or higher. COMM 1110 or THEA 1110 may be taken in Area B to satisfy this requirement.
7. Recommendation by the student's academic advisor and one other professor who has recently taught the student (other than the instructor of EDUC 2010 or EDEC 2400).
8. Recommendation by the appropriate program faculty, and approval by the Dean of the School of Education.

* NOTE: Candidates are exempt from this requirement if they have earned qualifying scores on any of these tests:

SAT minimum score: 480V and 520M;
GRE minimum score: 490V and 540Q; or
ACT minimum score: 21E and 22M.

Opening School Experience

During the senior year, students majoring in Middle Grades, Secondary, and P-12 (excluding Special Education) are required to spend the equivalent of two weeks (80 hours) in a school approved by the School of Education. Students are encouraged to fulfill this experience by scheduling it for the beginning of the public school year (August) so they may gain knowledge of activities and problems related to starting school, at the level and in the area of their majors. Arrangements for the experience are made cooperatively by the School of Education, the student, and the school involved. Application forms and directions for completing the Opening School Experience may be obtained from the Director of Clinical Experiences. Students must apply for Admission to Teacher Education before gaining permission for Opening School Experience. Field experience hours earned during Opening School Experience may be used to satisfy the Board of Regents' requirements for field experience hours. Students are expected to complete the equivalent of one-half year of field experience hours prior to student teaching.

Admission to Student Teaching

Completion of Student Teaching under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and a university supervisor is required of each Teacher Education student. Student Teaching occurs during the senior year and is considered a "full time" experience. Students may not enroll for additional courses other than the seminar course while Student Teaching without special permission, nor should they engage in outside activities that detract from Student Teaching.

Student Teaching is conducted in elementary, middle, and secondary schools within the area served by the University. Each assignment is made by the School of Education after a careful study of the student's academic record and general college/university experience. The School of Education reserves the right to assign a student to any school in its service area according to the best interests of the student and the University. Georgia Southwestern State University's service area includes school systems in the following counties: Ben Hill, Bleckley, Chattahoochee, Crisp, Dodge, Dooly, Dougherty, Houston, Lee, Macon, Marion, Peach, Pulaski, Randolph, Schley, Sumter, Taylor, Terrell, Tift, Turner, Upson, Webster, Wilcox, and Worth.

Application for Student Teaching must be filed with the Director of Clinical Experiences. Deadlines for applications for Student Teaching are as follows: Fall Semester-February 1, Spring Semester - September 1.

Prerequisites for Student Teaching are as follows:

1. Admission by letter to a Teacher Education program at Georgia Southwestern State University at least two semesters prior to the Student Teaching semester;
2. Completion of fifteen semester hours of credit in residence at Georgia Southwestern, including the materials and methods course specific to the major;
3. Completion of the General Core Curriculum with a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on all core work whether taken at other colleges/universities or at Georgia Southwestern;
4. Completion of EDUC 3040, Introduction to Reading, with a grade of C or higher, for all applicable curriculum areas.
5. Completion of all course work required except Student Teaching with a grade of C or higher whether taken at other colleges/universities or at Georgia Southwestern;
6. An overall grade point average of 2.5 or higher in all course work whether taken at other colleges/universities or at Georgia Southwestern;
7. Recommendation by major advisor and endorsement by the appropriate area curriculum committee.
8. Successful completion of Praxis II prior to Student Teaching.

Exit Examination

All students admitted to Teacher Education must successfully complete the PRAXIS II (professional assessment for beginning teachers) in the appropriate certificate area prior to Student Teaching. This test serves as the undergraduate degree program exit examination and must be successfully completed in order to satisfy student teaching requirements.

Certification

Teacher certification is granted by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission. Students successfully completing all requirements in a baccalaureate Teacher Education program and meeting the Praxis I and Praxis II requirements may apply to the Georgia Professional Standards Commission for a clear-renewable professional certificate. Application forms for certification may be obtained from the School of Education Office. Students should complete application forms and submit them prior to the end of the semester in which they anticipate completing certification requirements.

DEPARTMENT OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Chair: Mayo

Faculty: Dorminey, Dunn, Foster, Mayo, Medders

The student who specializes in Early Childhood Education has career options in a variety of settings: public and private preschools, agencies, community programs, child care, public schools, and private enterprise. With advanced training, supervisory and administrative positions are available. Students who plan to teach in pre-kindergarten through 5th grade (P-5) must enroll in this program to obtain certification.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Core Curriculum Requirements. Core curriculum requirements should be completed during the first two years. Students must meet the General Core Curriculum requirements as established by the University and the School of Education.

Admission to Teacher Education.

Admission to Teacher Education is required for a student to enroll in all 3000-4000 level courses. A grade of C or higher is required in each professional and teaching field course, and a cumulative/institution grade point average of 2.5 is required for both student teaching and graduation.

Early Childhood Education Professional Sequence. The Early Childhood Education professional sequence enables students to develop understanding and abilities that are essential for teaching young children.

Additional Education Professional Courses. Additional education professional courses complement the Early Childhood Education professional sequence. These courses are: EDSP 2010 and EDUC 3200. Completion of these courses enable students to develop understanding and abilities essential for teaching children with special needs and integrating technology into curriculum and instruction for young children.

University System of Georgia Board of Regents Academic Minor in Reading Requirements. The USG Board of Regents requires that programs in Early Childhood Education include an academic minor (at least 12 credit hours) in reading. Courses that are taken to complete this requirement include: EDUC 3040, EDRG 3050, EDUC 4100, and EDRG 4050.

University System of Georgia Board of Regents Academic Minor in Mathematics Requirements. The USG Board of Regents requires that programs in Early Childhood Education include an academic minor (at least 12 credit hours) in mathematics. Courses that are taken to complete this requirement include: MATH 2204, MATH 3001, MATH 3002, and MATH 4490.

University System of Georgia Board of Regents Field Experience Requirements. The USG Board of Regents requires that programs in Early Childhood Education include field experience requirements that are equivalent to at least one year of internship prior to completion of the program. Early Childhood Education majors meet this requirement by completing three practicum courses (EDEC 3901, EDEC 3902, and EDEC 4900) and student teaching (EDEC 4970, EDEC 4980, and EDEC 4990). [In each of the three practicum courses, students document more than 150 hours of internship. During Student Teaching, students complete more than 450 internship hours in an assigned classroom.]

Early Childhood Block Experiences

Junior 1 Block. Students in the Early Childhood Junior 1 Block (EDEC 3400, EDEC 3450, and EDEC 3901) have the unique opportunity to integrate their college course work with young children in an elementary grade. In this experience students observe teaching of young children throughout the school day; plan, create, teach and evaluate using materials and developmentally appropriate instruction with a variety of strategies and technology; and observe and assist with classroom management. Students engage with culturally and exceptionally diverse learners, parents, and school personnel. Students meet for seminar in order to reflect on and discuss how the knowledge and skills they are acquiring in their professional courses are implemented in practical ways in classroom settings. Upon successful completion of the Junior 1 Block, students will be recommended to advance in the program to the Junior 2 Block sequence.

Junior 1 Block Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education, successful completion of EDEC 2400 and EDEC 2500.

Junior 2 Block. Students in the Early Childhood Education Junior 2 block (EDEC 3600, EDEC 3650, and EDEC 3902) have the opportunity to integrate their college course work with the teaching of children in an elementary . In this experience students observe teaching of upper elementary school-aged children throughout the school day; plan, create, teach and evaluate using materials and appropriate instruction with a variety of strategies and technology; and observe and assist with classroom management. Students engage with culturally and exceptionally diverse learners, parents, and school personnel. Students meet for seminar in order to reflect on and discuss how the knowledge and skills they are acquiring are implemented in practical ways in classroom settings. Upon successful completion of the Junior 2 Block, students will be recommended to advance in the program to the Senior 1 Block sequence.

Junior 2 Block Prerequisites: Junior 1 Block.

Senior 1 Block. Students in the Early Childhood Senior 1 Block (EDEC 4200, EDEC 4250, EDEC 4550, and EDEC 4900) continue to develop more extensive knowledge and skills for integrating their college course work with the teaching of children. During the Senior 1 Block, students select the grade level of the practicum experience (P-K, 1-3, or 4-5). They assume increased responsibility for observing the teaching of children; planning, teaching, and evaluating appropriate materials and instruction for children; and assisting with classroom management. Students meet for seminar in order to reflect on and discuss how increasing knowledge and skills they are acquiring in their professional courses are implemented in practical ways in classroom settings. Upon successful completion of the Senior 1 Block, students will be recommended to advance to Student Teaching.

Senior 1 Block Prerequisites: Junior 2 Block.

Senior 2 Block. Students in the Early Childhood Education Senior 2 Block (EDEC 4960, EDEC 4970, EDEC 4980, and EDEC 4990) enroll in the Senior Seminar and Student Teaching classes. During this final semester of the Early Childhood Education BSEd Program, students are assigned to an elementary school classroom for Student Teaching. Student Teaching involves full-time planning and implementation of instruction with the assigned group of children for the complete semester. In addition to time spent with children in a classroom, students also participate in the Senior 2 Practicum  during which they receive relevant information about current and future teaching and reflect upon the experiences that they are having in their assigned classrooms.

Senior 2 Block Prerequisites: Senior 1 Block.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

DEPARTMENT OF MIDDLE GRADES AND SECONDARY EDUCATION

Chair: Watford

Faculty: Kolo, Neale, Rhodes, Watford

Middle Schools serve a student population undergoing physical, intellectual, and psychological changes. Teachers prepared to meet the developmental needs of young adolescents are at the heart of the Middle School. The School of Education's Middle Grades program prepares a teacher who understands the nature of the learner, creates meaningful learning environments, empowers students, collaborates with other teachers, and knows the value of caring. The Middle Grades program prepares students to become responsive, knowledgeable, and capable teachers of adolescents.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN MIDDLE GRADES

Core Curriculum Requirements: Core curriculum requirements should be completed during the first two years. Students must meet the General Core Curriculum requirements as established by the University and the School of Education.

Admission to Teacher Education. Admission to Teacher Education is required for a student to enroll in all 3000-4000 level courses. A grade of C or higher is required in each professional and teaching field course, and a cumulative/institution grade point average of 2.50 is required for both Student Teaching and graduation.

Middle Grades Block Experiences. Children (10-15 years of age) experience many changes in their lives, and it takes a uniquely prepared individual to teach, advise, and guide them. The faculty at Georgia Southwestern State University is committed to preparing outstanding Middle Grades teachers. In this spirit, students admitted to the Middle Grades program must participate in a junior year Spring Collaborative and a senior year Fall Block schedule Junior Collaborative. The Junior Collaborative occurs during the Spring term of the student's junior year. The Senior Block schedule will take place during the Fall term of the student's senior year. There are five courses that must be taken during the Senior Block term.

Junior Collaborative:   Senior Block:
EDMG 2300-Middle Grades Learner   EDMG 3030-Language Arts
EDMG 3100-Mathematics   EDMG 4050-Social Studies
EDMG 3060-Science   EDMG 4400-Materials and Methods
Concentration Course   EDUC 3200-Audio Visual
Concentration Course or Elective   

In both the Junior Collaborative and the Senior Block semesters, students will be required to participate in extensive field experiences that will be closely supervised by both the faculty members teaching the respective courses and classroom teachers in the field. Through the planned activities associated with the blocks and the extensive field experiences, students will emerge well-prepared for the demanding, yet rewarding role of a Middle Grades teacher.

Primary and Secondary Concentration Areas: Students in Middle Grades must complete a primary concentration area and a secondary concentration area. The primary concentration requires a total of 15 semester hours of course work, while the secondary concentration requires a total of 12 semester hours of course work. The primary and secondary concentrations must be selected from the areas of Language Arts, Social Studies, Science, or Mathematics.

The following courses marked with an asterisk (*) are required when a student chooses that specific concentration for a primary or secondary concentration. A grade of C or higher is required in each teaching field course. Major teaching field courses should be taken during the junior and senior years.

Language Arts: EDMG 3030*, ENGL 3210, ENGL 3220, ENGL 4010, 3 hrs English or Reading elective.

Social Science: EDMG 4050*, and at least one course from each of the following areas: Regional Perspectives (HIST 3510, 3770, 3780 3810), World Perspectives (HIST 4110, 4770, 4800, POLS 3210), US Government Perspective (POLS 3110, 4460, 4470, 4570), 3 hrs. of Social Studies elective.

Science: EDMG 3060*, 4-hr science elective* (must be Chemistry or Physical Science if not taken in Core Area D), and at least two additional courses from the following:
BIOL 3300, BIOL 3600, BIOL 3710, BIOL 4050, BIOL 4350, BIOL 4500, BIOL 4800, GEOL 3111, GEOL 3121, GEOL 3311, OR GEOL 3411.

Mathematics: EDMG 3100*, MATH 3001, 3002, 4490, 3 hrs Mathematics elective.

NOTE: Other courses in concentration may be approved where appropriate at the discretion of the advisor and the Department Chair.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION

Georgia Southwestern State University offers programs leading to certification in secondary education in English, History, Mathematics, Science (with concentrations in Biology and Chemistry), and Social Science. These programs complement a strong academic background in the teaching field as well as providing the knowledge, skills, and experiences prerequisite to effective instruction. Students who plan to teach grades 7-12 must enroll in the appropriate program. Requirements for each program are established jointly by the School of Education and the School of Arts and Sciences and respective departments. Students are assigned academic advisors from within the respective academic school or department. The School of Education plans and schedules courses in the professional sequence and coordinates the overall programs of students. All programs are designed to lead to eligibility for the initial teaching certificate in Georgia.

Students should be familiar with the BASIC REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL UNDERGRADUATE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS listed previously, denoting requirements specifically for Teacher Education students. Changes in major program requirements must be approved in writing by the Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences and the Dean of the School of Education.

Core Curriculum Requirements. Students must meet the General Core Curriculum requirements as established by the University for each Teacher Education program. A GPA of 2.5 or higher is required for courses used to meet General Core Curriculum requirements. This applies to course work taken at other institutions as well as at Georgia Southwestern State University. Transfer students must meet the same core GPA requirements. Because of the several options in Teacher Education programs, the specific courses required in Area F of the core will vary from program to program. Students should take such courses only with the approval of the appropriate academic area advisor. COMM 1110, THEA 1110 or demonstrated competence in Speech is a requirement in all Teacher Education programs. COMM 1110 or THEA 1110 may be taken in Area B to satisfy this requirement.

Professional Sequence. The professional sequence consists of twenty-eight semester hours in Education and Psychology. Admission to Teacher Education is required for a student to enroll in the materials and methods courses and EDSC 4970, 4980, and 4990.

Required Teaching Field Courses. Teaching field requirements are established by the academic departments and the School of Education. A grade of C or higher is required in each course applied to a teaching field. At least fifteen semester hours of teaching field courses in addition to required General Core Curriculum courses and the professional sequence courses must be completed prior to Student Teaching. Specific requirements for each area follow.

DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATION, READING, AND P-12

Chair: Spann

Faculty: Hunter, McWhorter, Nichols, Spann

Special Education

Students planning to teach individuals with disabilities should enroll in this program. Students may select a concentration in Intellectual Disabilities or Learning Disabilities leading to Georgia T-4 certification.

A degree in Special Education qualifies an individual for professional opportunities in public schools and other settings concerned with meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. Special Education graduates are currently in great demand in Georgia and throughout the nation.

Special Education Block. All students seeking initial certification in Special Education are required to complete the Special Education Block prior to Student Teaching. The Special Education Block is a full-time experience of 17 semester hours. Students spend approximately 20 hours per week as interns serving special education pupils in public schools under the supervision of cooperating teachers. Additionally, they are enrolled in university course work on campus.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES

Core Curriculum Requirements. Core Curriculum requirements should be completed during the first two years. Students must meet the General Core Curriculum requirements as established by the University and the School of Education.

Professional Sequence. The professional sequence consists of 39 semester hours of education courses designed to develop understanding and competencies essential for teaching.

Required Teaching Field Courses. All Special Education majors working in the certification area of Intellectual Disabilities must take the following upper level courses: EDSP 4110, 3050, 4120, 4150, 4050, 4130, 4510, 4060, EDUC 3030, 3040, 3500, and six hours of electives. Major teaching field courses should be taken during the junior and senior years. Teaching field courses, including the Special Education Block, should be completed prior to Student Teaching. Students must be admitted to Teacher Education prior to enrollment in any 3000-4000 level courses.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN LEARNING DISABILITIES

Core Curriculum Requirements. Core curriculum requirements should be completed during the first two years. Students must meet the General Core Curriculum requirements as established by the University and the School of Education.

Professional Sequence. The professional sequence consists of 39 semester hours of education courses designed to develop understanding and competencies essential for teaching.

Required Teaching Field Courses. All Special Education majors working in the certification area of Learning Disabilities must take the following upper level courses:, EDEC or EDMG 3100, EDSP 4310, 4320, 4350, 4050, 4060, 4510, EDUC 3030, 3040, 3500, 4100, and six hours of electives. Major teaching field courses should be taken during the junior and senior years. Teaching field courses, including the Special Education Block, should be completed prior to Student Teaching. Students must be admitted to Teacher Education prior to enrollment in any 3000-4000 level courses.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

P-12 EDUCATION

P-12 education programs are designed for students who plan to teach Music, Art, Health and Physical Education, French, and Spanish. Students who plan to teach grades P-12 must enroll in the appropriate program. Requirements for each program are established jointly by the School of Education and the respective academic department. Students entering Fall 2002 who plan to teach Music or Art should complete the curriculum for the B.A. in Music or the B.A. in Art and complete teacher certification requirements.

Students are assigned academic advisors from within the respective academic school or department. The School of Education plans and schedules courses in the professional sequence and coordinates the overall programs of students. All programs are designed to lead to eligibility for the initial teaching certificate in Georgia.

Students should be familiar with the BASIC REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL UNDERGRADUATE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS listed previously, denoting requirements specifically for teacher education students. Changes in major program requirements must be approved in writing by the Dean of the respective academic school and the Dean of the School of Education. All courses taken during the junior and senior years must be approved by the student's academic advisor.

Core Curriculum Requirements. Students must meet the General Core Curriculum requirements as established by the University for each Teacher Education program. A GPA of 2.5 or higher is required for courses used to meet General Core Curriculum requirements. This applies to coursework taken at other institutions as well as at Georgia Southwestern State University. Transfer students must meet the same core GPA requirements. Because of the several options in Teacher Education programs, the specific courses required in Area F of the core will vary from program to program. Students should take such courses only with the approval of the appropriate academic area advisor.

Professional Sequence. The professional sequence consists of 28 semester hours in Education and Psychology. In addition, EDSP 2010 is required in all programs. EDUC 2010 should be taken during the sophomore year. A grade of C or higher is required in each professional sequence course.

Required Teaching Field Courses. Teaching field requirements are established by the academic school and the School of Education. A grade of C or higher is required in each course applied to a teaching field. At least fifteen semester hours of teaching field courses in addition to required General Core Curriculum courses and the professional sequence courses must be completed prior to Student Teaching. Specific requirements for each area follow:

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Chair: Hawver

Faculty: Barksdale, Davis, Hay, Haywood, Spaniol, Stokes

The Department of Health and Human Performance offers a Bachelor of Science in Education degree with a teaching major in Health and Physical Education, a Bachelor of Science in Education with a concentration in Exercise Science/Wellness, and a Bachelor of Science in Education with a major in Recreation. The growth of sports in the American culture, the increased public interest in health and physical fitness, and the emphasis on equal opportunity have resulted in expanded sports programs throughout the nation.

The purpose of the Health and Physical Education curriculum is to prepare majors for careers in teaching students at the preschool level through the secondary level and for coaching positions at the middle and secondary level. Completion of degree requirements and successful completion of the PRAXIS Exam lead to certification by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission.

The Bachelor of Science in Education degree with a concentration in Exercise Science/Wellness is designed to prepare graduates who prefer careers in corporate fitness and wellness. Completion of the program will provide the undergraduate student with the entry level skills and the knowledge base to function competently in a wide range of fitness/wellness employment opportunities.

The Bachelor of Science in Education degree with a major in Recreation is designed to prepare graduates to enter different areas of recreational service. In our society, recreation is considered to be an important counter to the stress and pressure of modern living. The purpose of the recreation field is to provide a wide variety of physical, mental, social, and cultural opportunities for all people. The leisure service field is recognized as a multi-million dollar industry with such varied branches as follows:

School Recreation: Intramurals, student activities director, student union director, in public and private elementary and secondary schools and colleges.

Public Recreation: Community recreation programs, park administration, community education, cultural programs and services.

Commercial Recreation: Direction of amusement centers, bowling lanes, golf courses, private gyms, movies, and sporting events.

Armed Forces Recreation: Special Services, USO, and Red Cross.

Group Work Recreation: YMCA, YWCA, Boys' Clubs, Girls' Clubs, Scouts, and other related youth groups.

Therapeutic Medical Recreation: Hospitals and mental institutions.

Resort Recreation: Hotels and auxiliary recreation services.

Private Recreation: Condominiums, private communities, special interest clubs, country clubs, and athletic clubs.

The emphasis at Georgia Southwestern is to provide the future recreation professionals with the administrative and technical knowledge needed for proper execution of such positions. For more information concerning these programs, students should consult the Chair of the Department of Health and Human Performance.

Students working toward a baccalaureate degree must complete the service courses in Health and Human Performance as part of the general university requirements. (See Academic Regulations for exemptions). A minimum grade point average of C (2.00) is required in the 1000 level courses.

Students enrolled in other programs offered by the University must complete physical education courses required in the specific programs.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Students planning to teach Health and Physical Education in grades P-12 must enroll in this program.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN EXERCISE SCIENCE/WELLNESS

This program is designed to prepare graduates who prefer careers in corporate fitness and wellness. The program does not lead to certification to teach.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN RECREATION

This program is designed to prepare students for positions with agencies providing for the recreative use of leisure time in our society. The program does not lead to teacher certification.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

  MINOR IN RECREATION

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

SCHOOL OF NURSING

Dean: Warda

Faculty: Cason, Chelini, Cook, Daniel, Easom, Hunt, Malachowski, Mixon, Morris, Rozmus, Simmons, Taylor, Warda.

The School of Nursing (SON) offers the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree program. Baccalaureate graduates are prepared for a variety of beginning positions – in hospitals, community health care agencies, private offices, the military, industry, and schools. A baccalaureate education also establishes the basis for further learning in graduate programs.

The BSN program accommodates students in two tracks: the basic generic track and the RN/BSN track. The basic generic track is designed for students without an earned degree in nursing. The RN/BSN track is for individuals educated at the diploma or associate degree level and already licensed as registered nurses. The SON supports the Georgia Articulation plan to facilitate educational mobility for registered nurses.

The BSN program has full approval from the Georgia Board of Nursing (237 Coliseum Drive; Macon, GA, 31217-3858; 478.207.1640). The School of Nursing is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (61 Broadway, 33rd Floor; New York, NY, 10006; 212.363.5555).

MISSION STATEMENT OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING

The mission of Georgia Southwestern State University School of Nursing is to prepare professional nurses for the 21st century who can work with diverse populations in multiple practice settings. In a caring community of learning, we are preparing future leaders with our focus on helping students learn.

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

The faculty of the School of Nursing at Georgia Southwestern State University (GSW) believes that nursing is a practice-oriented discipline focused on the promotion of health of human beings in interaction with their environments. Human beings are unique and individual in their responses to health and illness, and represent a variety of socio-economic and educational perspectives, ethnic backgrounds and lifestyle patterns.

We believe that health can be viewed as a personal commitment and a social commitment. We believe that health should be seen as a community and societal obligation rather than only as a personal responsibility. From this perspective, health is influenced by biological, social, cultural, spiritual, political and psychological factors.

We believe that because nurses are being challenged to care for patients who are socially, politically and economically disadvantaged, they must move beyond a psychological conceptualization of the environment into a sociopolitical-economic and cultural conceptualization. Through this reconceptualization, nurses can see that human responses to health and illness are related to the structure of the social world, the economic and political policies that govern the structure, and the human, social relationships that are produced by the structure and the policies.

We believe that nursing education should be based on critical analysis and synthesis of facts, concepts, principles, and theories from nursing, in addition to the social, educational, behavioral, humanities, natural, medical, and basic sciences. We believe that basic and applied research generated knowledge should be included throughout the nursing curriculum. In addition, we believe in the need to ensure that curriculum content and models, teaching-learning practices, and evaluation methods should be responsive to the actual needs of society and consistent with evolving health care and education reforms.

OBJECTIVES FOR THE BSN PROGRAM

The aim of the baccalaureate curriculum is to prepare persons to provide professional nursing care in a variety of practice settings.

The curriculum has been structured to prepare graduates to do the following:

  1. Practice nursing that encompasses caring within the human health experience, and focuses on a holistic conceptualization of the needs of humans. This practice is based on knowledge, clinical judgment, and perspective that includes the ability to engage in the following processes:
    • Assess the significance of a wide range of factors (physiological, social, personal, cultural, psychological, and spiritual) and their interrelationships in such a way as to identify and define common nursing problems.
    • Assess availability, accessibility, and relevance of resources for individual, family, and community problem resolution.
    • Formulate a plan for helping the individual, family, or community to mobilize and use resources appropriate to their particular problem or situation.
    • Implement the formulated plan or modification thereof.
    • Evaluate the results of interventions in relation to immediate and long-term consequences and modify future related interventions as necessary.
  2. Demonstrate skills necessary for the professional practice of nursing.
  3. Advance towards professionalism. Professionalism entails
    • Progressive mastery of the knowledge, skills, and critical thinking needed by the profession;
    • Demonstrated commitment to a nursing perspective; that is, internalization of the values, traditions, and obligations of the profession; and
    • Identification with and commitment to the profession’s function in the larger society.

Admission Guidelines (for basic generic applicants)

  1. acceptance in good standing by the University;
  2. application to the School of Nursing by the published deadline;
  3. all general education/core classes from Areas A, D, and F completed;
  4. completion of Concepts of Professional Nursing (NURS 2600), Clinical Therapeutics (NURS 2700) and Human Pathophysiology (NURS 3150). Minimum grade of "C" required;
  5. both parts of Regents’ Test passed;
  6. no more than nine (9) hours of general education classes from Areas B, C, and/or E and PEDS 1010 (Life-time Fitness) to be completed;
  7. completion of anatomy and physiology (BIOL 2030 and 2040) and microbiology (BIOL 2050) within five years of projected admission. Minimum grade of "C" required. Testing is required of those applicants who completed these courses five years ago or longer. Remediation may be required; and
  8. an overall grade point average of at least a 2.5/4.0 for consideration. The grade point average is taken from the transcript of the most recently attended institution from which the student earned at least 30 semester hours of credit.

Admission Guidelines (for RN/BSN applicants)

  1. acceptance in good standing by the University;
  2. application to the School of Nursing by the published deadline;
  3. all general education/core classes from Areas A and D completed. These courses completed from Area F: BIOL 2030, 2040, 2050 and PSYC 2103;
  4. both parts of Regents’ Test passed;
  5. completion of Human Pathophysiology (NURS 3150). Minimum grade of “C” required;
  6. no more than nine (9) hours of general education classes from Areas B, C, and/or E still to be completed;
  7. an overall grade point average of at least a 2.5/4.0 for consideration. The grade point average is taken from the transcript of the most recently attended institution from which the student earned at least 30 semester hours of credit; and
  8. results of validation testing and remediation, if required.

As part of the application process, students submit two letters of recommendation from employers or teachers with whom the student has had contact within the last two years and an essay on reasons for choosing nursing. Faculty review this information along with the students’ SAT or ACT scores, grades in science courses, and grades in courses designated NURS taken to-date.

For students who are accepted, the following items must be addressed prior to the start of the semester:

  1. the student must hold current certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation at the minimum level of basic life support for health professionals;
  2. the student must hold professional liability insurance;
  3. the student must hold health insurance;
  4. the student must submit a completed health form, including evidence of current status of immunizations; and
  5. (for RN students), current licensure as a registered nurse in Georgia.

IN THE ABSENCE OF ANY OF THE ABOVE ITEMS, THE STUDENT WILL NOT BE PERMITTED TO CONTINUE IN THE NURSING COURSES.

Standardized Testing

As part of the SON ongoing assessment plan, students are tested throughout the program for mastery of course content. Students are responsible for the cost of the tests.

Curriculum

Students complete approximately 62 hours of general education classes and about 62 hours of courses specific to the major. A typical full-time sequence of upper level courses is listed below. The student may elect to attend on a part-time basis. Full-time RN-BSN students may combine Semester 1 and Semester 3 courses as well as Semester 2 and Semester 4 courses. The program must be completed within five years of taking Health Assessment.

Various facilities in Americus and the surrounding communities are used for clinical experiences. Students must provide their own transportation.

Semester 1   Semester 2
Nursing of Adults I   Nursing of the Family
Health Assessment*   Gerontological Nursing*
Pharmacology Elective*   
Health Promotion*   
Nutrition   
Professional Nursing Practice**   
Semester 3   Semester 4
Nursing of Adults II   Community and Public Health Nursing*
Leadership*   Research in Nursing*
Psychiatric-Mental Health   Nursing Practicum in Nursing*

* courses required of students in the RN/BSN program.
** course required only of students in the RN/BSN program.

Georgia Articulation Model
The Georgia Southwestern State University School of Nursing supports the Georgia RN-BSN Articulation Model. The purpose of this model is to facilitate the educational mobility of registered nurses who elect to pursue a baccalaureate degree in nursing. RN/BSN students are awarded 32 nursing credit hours after successfully passing the Health Assessment course. [contact the SON office for details: 229.931.2275]

Progression Requirements

A minimum grade of “C” or better is required in each nursing course. The student must maintain an overall grade point average of 2.50 to progress to the next term. A failure in any nursing course numbered 3xxx or 4xxx is considered a failure in the nursing program. A student may repeat only one nursing course after failure to receive a passing grade. The failed nursing course must be repeated the following semester when possible. A grade of WF counts as one attempt.

After admission to the nursing program, the student must take all nursing courses at Georgia Southwestern State University.

A student who has been out of the program for a calendar year or more must apply for readmission. Readmission is not guaranteed. Prior to readmission the student will be tested on basic skills. Remediation may be required.

All general education requirements (AREAs A-F) must be completed prior to taking Practicum in Nursing (NURS 4900).

Because independent study courses may take over a semester to complete, such courses which are pre-or co-requisite to a particular nursing course must already be in progress at the time of enrollment in the nursing course. The independent study course must be completed at the same time as the nursing course.

The entire program must be completed within five years of successfully passing Health Assessment.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements (BSN).
Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements (BSN-RN).

GRADUATE STUDIES

GRADUATE PROGRAMS AND ADMISSIONS

Students wishing to make application to a graduate program at Georgia Southwestern State University must submit a complete admissions packet. Incomplete application packets will not be accepted. The complete admissions packet is comprised of the following:

  • Application for admission
  • Non-refundable $20 application fee
  • Official transcripts from all previously attended colleges and universities*
  • Official test scores
  • Proof of immunizations
  • Three letters of recommendation

Applications to the Specialist in Education Program must also include:

  • Proof of eligibility for T-5 certification
  • Verification of teaching experience

*International students must meet additional requirements and should refer to the section below on International Student Admissions

APPLICATION DEADLINES

Complete application packets for the following terms must be received by the deadlines listed below:

Fall admission   June 30
Spring admission   October 15
Summer admission   March 15

Georgia Southwestern graduate programs provide advanced study in management, accounting, computer science, and education. The degrees of Specialist in Education, Master of Education, Master of Business Administration, and in Computer Science may be earned.

Students may earn the Master of Education degree in the following fields: Biology, Early Childhood Education, English, Health and Physical Education, History, Mathematics, Middle Grades Education, Reading (P-12), Science, Social Science, and Special Education. The Specialist in Education degree may be earned in the fields of Early Childhood Education and Middle Grades Education.

The Master of Science in Computer Science degree offers a concentration in Computer Science or Computer Information Systems.

The Master of Business Administration offers the options of taking elective courses in accounting, management, or a combination of courses approved by the MBA advisor.

The Master of Science in Nursing with a concentration in Nursing Midwifery will begin in the fall 2004.

Admission to graduate standing is a prerequisite for enrollment in graduate courses. Courses numbered 5000 and above are graduate level courses. Education courses numbered 5000-5999 are for certification only. Education courses numbered 6000 to 7999 may be used in fifth and sixth year programs and for certification. Courses numbered 8000 and above are open only to fully admitted sixth year students. Students lacking the necessary preparation in business must take the appropriate 5000 level courses prior to beginning the Master's program in Business Administration. These courses may not be used to satisfy degree requirements for these programs.

TYPES OF ADMISSION

There are five general types of admission to graduate studies at Georgia Southwestern State University: Regular, Non-Degree, Personal Development, Post Baccalaureate and Transient. The five types are described below.

- Regular Admission (without conditions). An  applicant in this category has completed all the requirements for admission to a specific degree program.

- Regular Admission (with conditions). An applicant who does not meet all the requirements for admission to a specific degree program may be admitted with the condition that he or she must complete nine (9) hours of graduate credit with a grade no lower than B. At the time the conditions are met, the student's record will be updated to reflect the change to regular admission without condition. If the conditions are not met (a grade lower than B in those nine hours), the student will be expelled from the graduate program.

- Non-Degree Program Admission. An applicant in this category must have a baccalaureate (undergraduate) degree from an accredited college or university. This type of admission allows one to take graduate courses for credit in the Alternative Preparation Program, for purposes of initial certification to teach, for certification renewal, or for adding certification in additional teaching fields. It does not admit one to a degree program. Under no circumstances can more than nine semester hours taken under non-degree status be used in a master's degree program. No courses taken under this status can be used in the specialist degree program. Applicants should refer to admission requirements for the individual graduate degree programs for additional requirements.

- Personal Development. An applicant in this category must have a baccalaureate (undergraduate) degree from an accredited college or university. Graduate courses taken under this category cannot be applied towards a master's degree.

-Post Baccalaureate. An applicant in this category must have a baccalaureate (undergraduate) degree from an accredited college or university. This type of admission allows one to take graduate courses for credit without pursuing a graduate degree, i.e. satisfying graduate level pre-requisite course requirements, or pursuing graduate level certificate as not a degree program. Students, who wish to have certificate courses apply toward a degree program must meet admission requirements without conditions . Under no circumstances can more than nine semester hours taken under post baccalaureate status be used in a master's degree program.

-Transient. An applicant who is currently admitted to full graduate standing at another recognized institution may be admitted as a graduate transient student, with permission from the home institution once official transcripts have been received.

International Student Admission

Georgia Southwestern State University welcomes applications from international students to its graduate degree programs. Regular Admission (With Conditions) admission will be considered for those students whose test scores fall below the standard for regular admission. Students who are granted Regular Admission (With Conditions) admission must have their status changed to regular admission by the successful completion of two semesters course work.

In addition to requirements for admission to a graduate degree program listed elsewhere in this section, international students must submit the following items:

  1. An official report of scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 193 on the computerized test (523 on the paper test) is required for all types of admission to all graduate programs.
  2. A pre-entrance medical form (supplied by the University) completed by the student and a physician.
  3. Upon acceptance into a graduate program, a certified statement from the student's family, bank, or government that finances are available to cover educational expenses for the international student. This statement must be received in Graduate Admissions in order for an I-20 visa to be issued. There are assistantships available to be awarded on a competitive basis to qualified students.
  4. Proof that the student is covered by a health and accident insurance plan annually.
  5. All official international transcripts must have a foreign credential evaluation completed. Applications for this service can be obtained from the Graduate Admissions Office or from the following website:
    http://gsw.edu/Admissions/Who/International/index
  6. Certified copies of original diploma, degrees awarded and English translation of diploma, degrees awarded.
  7. Certified English translation of original transcripts from each institution previously attended. In cases where there is only one original copy, GSW will inspect the original copy, make a photocopy for the institutional records, and return the original to the applicant.

F-1 International Students

Georgia Southwestern State University is part of the Department of Homeland Security’s Student Exchange and Visitor Information System (SEVIS). Through this system, the university has become a liason between GSW international students and a number of government agencies. To meet federal obligations imposed by these agencies, Georgia Southwestern State University is required to report certain personal, academic, and employment related data on international students and scholars to the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration.

Georgia Southwestern State University is dedicated to enabling international students to accomplish their educational goals on our campus so long as the student maintains visa status and abides by the policies of the university. In an effort to assist students with immigration matters, each international student has been assigned a Designated School Official (DSO). All F-1 international students must consult a DSO before making any changes that will affect their immigration status. These changes include, but are not limited to, a change of major, a change of degree program, a change of address, a change of school, etc.

Classification   Designated School Offiical (DSO)  Assistant Designated School Official (ADSO)
Undergraduate Student   Mrs. Lynda Lee Purvis
Associate Dean of Academic Affairs
 Mrs. Sundai Tanner, 
Admissions Specialist
Graduate Students   Mrs. Lois Oliver, 
Graduate Admissions  
 Ms. Rebecca Clark, 
Assistant Designated School Official (ADSO)

Beginning Fall 2003, F-1 international students will be required to attend an international student orientation session at the beginning of each semester. The orientation session will inform and remind students of general international regulations that may affect their stay in the United States. As part of the orientation, students will be issued an International Student Handbook to use as a reference for international questions and concerns.

MAINTAINING F-1 VISA STATUS

In order for international students to maintain a valid F-1 Visa status, the following conditions must be met:

  1. Maintain a valid passport at all times.
  2. Attend the University that the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration (BCIS) has authorized you to attend by stamping your I-20 when you entered the U.S., or by being notified of your transfer to another school.
  3. Continue to carry a full course of study (12 hours for undergraduate students, 9 hours for graduate students) each regular semester (fall and spring).
  4. Apply with your Designated School Official promptly for an extension of stay if you are unable to complete your program of study by the ending date on your I-20.
  5. Apply with your Designated School Official for proper documentation to notify BCIS of a change of education level and/or a change in major.
  6. Do not change schools without first contacting your Designated School Official for proper documentation.
  7. Do not engage in any employment without proper authorization.
  8. Limit on-campus employment to 20 hours per week while school is in session.
  9. Report a change of address to the ADSO or DSO and the Registrar’s Office within 10 days of the change.
  10. Carry approved health insurance coverage.
  11. Request travel documents from your ADSO or DSO in advance of leaving the U.S.

Application Procedures

Application forms for admission to the Program of Graduate Studies may be obtained from Graduate Admissions and the Registrar's Office. Completed packets must be submitted by June 30 for fall admissionby October 15 for spring admissionand by March 15 for summer admission. All application forms must be accompanied by a $20.00 application fee (non-refundable). Applicants must submit official transcripts from all institutions attended, an appropriate test score, three letters of recommendation, and proof of required immunizations. Applicants for the Specialist in Education program must also submit T-5 certification and verification of teaching experience.

Applicants wishing evaluations from Georgia Southwestern State University for initial teacher certification must submit an application form, application fee, official transcripts from all institutions attended, and proof of required immunizations.

Applicants who do not enroll in the term indicated on the application must inform the Graduate Studies Office of their plans and indicate a new date of entrance.

An applicant for transient admission must submit an application, application fee, official transcripts from the home institution and a letter of transient permission from the appropriate dean of the student's home institution.

Readmission of Former Students

Former students who have not been in attendance for one calendar year or more must reapply through Graduate Admissions. Students who have attended another college since last attending Georgia Southwestern must submit an official transcript from that institution.

Students readmitted or reinstated will be evaluated for graduation from the catalog in effect at the time of readmission or reinstatement or any catalog in effect during subsequent periods of continuous enrollment.

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

Students pursuing a Master’s degree must maintain the following standards:

  1. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better
  2. Only two courses with grades of C can be applied to the degree
  3. No course with a grade below a C will be applied toward a degree
  4. In any graduate degree program, all requirements, including course work at Georgia Southwestern State University, transfer credit and transient credit course work, must be completed within seven (7) calendar years from the date of initial enrollment in course work, without regard to the initial admission status and without regard to credit hours earned.

Each School with a Graduate Program may have other academic requirements; please check the School web site or the appropriate section of the current Bulletin.

Graduate students who fail to maintain academic standards will be placed under academic review at the end of the semester in which their status falls below the required standards.

STUDENTS UNDER REVIEW

  1. Students who have been placed under review will have early registration cancelled for the following semester. These students will not be able to register on-line and must report to their advisor.
  2. The Registrar will send the names of students under review to the Director of Graduate Studies, the Deans of each School, the Department Chairs with graduate courses,, and the graduate advisors.
  3. Students under review must meet with their advisor to develop a remediation plan to demonstrate how the student can be returned to good standing. The plan will be forwarded to the Dean of the School for his or her signature before being placed in the student’s file. A copy of the form will also be sent to the Director of Graduate Studies and to the Graduate Admissions Specialist.
  4. At the end of the probationary semester, if the student  is not successful in returning to good standing, the Dean of the School, in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies, will send a certified letter of dismissal to the student with a copy to the student’s advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the Graduate Admissions Specialist.
  5. Graduate students who are dismissed from the School may write a letter of appeal within ten class days from the receipt of the dismissal letter to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Students re-admitted on appeal will have one additional semester to return to good academic standing.
  6. Re-admitted students who do not return to good standing after the initial probationary semester will be dismissed from the program and the university.
  7. Dismissed graduate students may re-apply for admission to the program after three calendar years. If the student is re-admitted, he or she must meet all requirements for the degree program at the time of re-enrollment. The years completed prior to dismissal will count towards the total seven (7) years to complete the degree. Re-admission is not automatic. Each application will be considered individually.

Graduate students pursuing the Specialist degree must maintain the following academic standards:

  1. Maintain an overall graduate GPA of 3.25
  2. No course with a grade below a B will be applied toward the degree
  3. Only one course with a grade of C may be repeated one time
  4. Degree requirements must be completed within seven (7) calendar years from the time of first enrollment.

Please review other requirements for the School of Education. Students under review or dismissed will follow the same procedures as for the Master’s degree.

Residence Requirements

All graduate programs offered at Georgia Southwestern State University require 50% of the course work be completed in residence.

Graduate Assistantships

A limited number of Graduate Assistantships are available within the Academic Affairs Division. Application forms are available by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies, Georgia Southwestern State University, 800 Wheatley Street, Americus, GA 31709-4693. E-mail: acadaff@canes.gsw.edu

Applications should be submitted by April 15 in order to be considered for the following year. Students must be fully admitted to a degree program before Graduate Assistantships can be awarded. International students must hold appropriate visas before applications for Graduate Assistantships can be processed. In addition, Graduate Assistantships may be awarded during an academic year if vacancies occur and if funding is available. Applications are therefore encouraged throughout the year but most will be processed in April.

Graduate Assistants will be assigned to particular Schools or Departments that will specify and supervise responsibilities. They will be expected to maintain a minimum load of nine nine graduate credit hours each semester. Graduate Assistants will be evaluated each semester, and the continuation of the assistantships will depend on satisfactory evaluations.

Assistantships are also available in the Departments of Athletics and Student Affairs, and interested students should make direct application to those Departments

.Advisement

Upon admission to the Program of Graduate Studies, each student is assigned an advisor. Advisors to reading, early childhood, middle grades and special education are assigned by the Dean of the School of Education. Advisors to secondary education majors are assigned by the appropriate Department Chair or Dean.

Academic Advisors in the Master of Science in Nursing with a concentration in Nursing Midwifery program will be assigned by the Dean of the School of Nursing.

Academic Advisors in the Master's of Business Administration programs are assigned by the Dean of the School of Business.  Advisors to students in the Computer Science Master's programs are assigned by the Dean of the School of Computer and Information Sciences.

Students in degree programs should enroll for courses only with the advice and approval of their advisors.

Application for Graduation - Graduate Students

The Application for Graduation for graduate students must be completed one full semester prior to the academic term in which the degree is expected.

Graduation Term   Apply no later than of the semester prior
Fall   May 1
Spring   August 1
Summer   January 1

Transfer Credit

In any graduate program a maximum of 9 semester hours of graduate credit may be transferred from another accredited institution under the following conditions:

  1. No grade less than a B (3.0) may be transferred.
  2. Work must have been completed within the seven-year period allowed for the completion of degree requirements.
  3. Work accepted in transfer to teacher education programs must have the approval of the Dean of the School of Education.
  4. Work accepted in transfer to the Master of Business Administration must have the approval of the Dean of the School of Business.
  5. Work accepted in transfer to the Master of Science in Computer Science must have the approval of the Dean of the School of Computer and Information Sciences.
  6. Work accepted in transfer to the Specialist in Education Degree programs must have been completed by the student while fully admitted as a regular student in a sixth year or doctoral degree program at an accredited college or university.
  7. Grades in transfer credits will not be used in calculating the grade point average and do not reduce residence requirements.

Experiential Learning Credit

GSW grants no credit for experiential learning at the graduate level except under the supervision of the institution.

Correspondence Credit

Under no circumstances may credit earned through correspondence work be used to satisfy graduate degree requirements.

Transient Student Procedure

Students wishing to enroll in coursework in another college or university to count towards degree requirements at Georgia Southwestern State University must be in good standing and petition the appropriate Dean for transient permission. They must have the approval of the faculty advisor and the appropriate Dean or Department Chair prior to enrolling at the other institution. Transient credit is considered the same as credit by transfer and is included in the nine semester hour limit stated above. Transient permission forms are available in the Registrar's Office and on-line.

Off-Campus Courses

When approved by the University, courses taken off campus, including those taken through an Area Teacher Education Service, may be applied towards a degree. Students enrolling in such courses must have the approval of their advisors prior to registration. (See residence requirements for Master and Specialist Levels).

Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Courses

A student with senior standing at Georgia Southwestern State University with an overall academic grade point average of 3.0 or higher may register for graduate courses during the final two terms of undergraduate work subject to the following regulations.

(1) No more than nine hours of graduate credit may be earned.
(2) The maximum course load when enrolled in one or more graduate courses is 15 hours per semester.
(3) Courses taken for graduate credit cannot be counted toward meeting undergraduate degree requirements.
(4) Permission to register for graduate courses must be granted first by the Director of Graduate Studies and then by the Vice President for Academic Affairs prior to registration.

Permission forms are available in the Registrar's Office.

Change in Program

Before a graduate student may transfer from one Teacher Education degree program to another, a request for transfer must be approved by the Dean of the School of Education and the chair of the new program. Students wishing to transfer to or from the Master's of Business Administration or the Management, Accounting, Social Administration or Computer Science Options of the Master of Science Program must have their request approved by the appropriate dean and department chair.

Adding or Dropping Courses

Following registration for the term, students may add or drop courses during the published add/drop period.

  • Students must discuss adding or dropping courses with their advisors.
  • Students who enter courses after the first day of class are responsible for making up missed assignments.
  • Students may add or drop a Learning Support course only with the approval of the Learning Support Coordinator. Students enrolled in both Learning Support classes and degree credit courses cannot drop the Learning Support courses without dropping the degree credit courses as well.
  • Students may not drop a Regents' remediation course without the approval of the Registrar or the Learning Support Coordinator.

After the published add/drop period, students may adjust their schedules only by "withdrawal." (See below.)

Students registered for courses that have the first class meeting after the designated add/drop period will be subject to the withdrawal from class policy or the withdrawal from the university policy below. Any orientation session for online or off-campus courses is considered the first class meeting for the course.

Withdrawals

A student who wishes to withdraw from the University should confer with the Counseling Services Office for the proper procedure. A student who wishes to withdraw from an individual class should initiate action in the Registrar's Office.

Load Limitations

Graduate students taking nine or more hours will be considered full-time. Graduate students may take a maximum of fifteen hours per term.

Grading Systems

Grade Point Average for Graduate Students

The grade point average (GPA) for graduate students includes all attempts on all graduate courses. It is a true cumulative GPA.

Policy on Repeating Graduate Courses

Normally, a course is counted only one time for credit hours toward a degree. If a graduate student wants to repeat a course that falls into this category, the student may do so with the understanding that credit hours attempted and quality points earned in all attempts of the course will be counted in the student’s grade point average (GPA) .

The grading system for graduate courses is as follows:

GradeAchievementQuality Points
A   Above Average   4
B   Average   3
C   Unsatisfactory   2
D   Poor   1
F   Failing   0
I   Incomplete   0
W   Withdrawn   0
WF   Withdrawn Failing (same as F)   0
WM   Withdrawn for Military Purposes   0
S   Satisfactory   0
U   Unsatisfactory   0
NR   No grade reported by instructor   0

A grade of I may be given in extenuating circumstances. If a grade of I is not removed before the end of the following term, it automatically becomes an F.

Students enrolled for thesis or directed study credit will receive an S for satisfactory performance or a U for unsatisfactory performance.

Students who for non-academic reasons stop attending class prior to midterm should withdraw from the course. A grade of "I" cannot be assigned in this situation.

INITIAL CERTIFICATION BY ALTERNATIVE PREPARATION PROGRAM FOR BACCALAUREATE DEGREE HOLDERS

Georgia Southwestern State University offers alternative preparation programs for baccalaureate degree holders who have not previously been certified to teach in the State of Georgia. The programs operate under the "Approved Program" concept. Each student in these programs has a unique curriculum designed that gives credit for previous work and outlines additional coursework needed for the desired certification. The time for completion of the program varies, depending on the course load and the number of required classes. Successful completion of the program leads to recommendation for certification by Georgia Southwestern State University to the Georgia Professional Standards Commission.

Students seeking initial certification in Early Childhood, Middle Grades, or Special Education must first apply for graduate admission to Georgia Southwestern State University and meet the requirements for graduate admission, (i.e., appropriate GRE or MAT scores, GPA requirement, etc.). Upon acceptance, the student's advisor will evaluate transcripts and plan with the student for certification coursework in addition to the 36-hour M.Ed. Program. Certification requirements will include at least 15 semester hours of professional education courses, some of which will be taken in a full semester block. Student Teaching will be required in addition to all content area course work the student has not completed.

Students seeking initial certification in any Secondary or P-12 area must first apply for graduate admission to Georgia Southwestern State University as a Non-Degree seeking student. Upon acceptance, students must complete an Application for Transcript Evaluation. An individual curriculum plan is developed from this evaluation that outlines specific requirements for certification. These requirements will include at least fifteen semester hours of professional education courses, Student Teaching, and all required coursework in the content area not previously completed. Secondary and P-12 areas are:

Art   English
French   Health and P.E.
History   Mathematics
Music   Science
Social Science   Spanish

Minimum Requirements for Admission to Student Teaching for Students Enrolled in an Initial Certification Program

  1. Complete required application forms and obtain approval to register from the Director of Clinical Experiences.
  2. Complete all required professional education courses.
  3. Complete 15 semester hours of credit in residence at Georgia Southwestern State University, including the materials and methods course specific to the age and certification field requested.
  4. Maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5 on undergraduate course work taken following admission to the program.
  5. Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 on all graduate course work taken following admission to the program.
  6. Post a passing score on the Praxis I (Academic Skills Assessment) or meet the exemption for this requirement.

Minimum Requirements for Exit and Recommendation for Certification

  1. Maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5 on undergraduate course work taken following admission to the program. No grade in an undergraduate class less than a C can be used in the program.
  2. Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 on all graduate course work taken following admission to the program. No grade in a graduate class less than a B can be used in the program.
  3. Successfully complete all assigned outcomes on the Curriculum Planning Form.
  4. Pass the Praxis I (Academic Skills Assessment) or meet the exemption for this requirement.
  5. Pass the Praxis II in the content area where initial certification is sought.
  6. Successfully complete Student Teaching.

Teaching Endorsement Programs

The School of Education offers four endorsement programs. These approved programs provide opportunities for graduate students to pursue preparation in the areas of Gifted Education, Pre-School/Special Education, Reading Education, and the Teacher Support Specialist. Endorsements in these areas allow students to develop skills, gain knowledge, and qualify for additional teaching/work-related responsibilites. All courses are offered at the graduate level. Students may pursue endorsements under a non-degree seeking status or may use some endorsement courses to satisfy degree program requirements if appropriate and with advisor approval.

Gifted Education. The Gifted Education endorsement may be added to teaching, counseling, administration and supervision certificates at all levels, and may be brought forward to the higher levels of appropriate certificates. An individual with the Gifted Education endorsement is in-field to teach students identified as gifted in grades K-12. Courses comprising the Gifted Education endorsement include EDSP 6210 (Characteristics of Gifted Individuals), EDSP 6220 (Materials and Methods in the Education of the Gifted Individual), EDSP 6230 (Curriculum and Program Development for Gifted Education), and EDSP 7510 (Psychoeducational Evaluation and Assessments).

Pre-School/Special Education. The Preschool/Special Education endorsement may be added to teaching certificates at all levels and may be brought forward to the higher levels of appropriate certificates. An individual with the Preschool/Special Education endorsement is in-field to teach children in preschool/special education. Courses comprising the Preschool/Special Education endorsement include EDSP 6610 (Characteristics of Preschool Special Education Children), EDSP 6620 (Methods and Curriculum in Preschool Special Education), and EDSP 6630 (Preschool Language Development).

Reading Education. The Reading Education endorsement may be added to teaching, counseling, administration, and supervision certificates at all levels and may be brought forward to higher levels of appropriate certificates. Courses comprising the Reading Education endorsement include EDRG 6200 (Teaching of Reading), EDRG 6210 (Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Difficulties), and EDRG 6280 (Reading in the Content Fields).

Teacher Support Specialist. The Teacher Support Specialist endorsement may be added to a professional teaching certificate at the bachelor's level or higher or the service field of Speech and Language Pathology. Courses comprising the Teacher Support Specialist endorsement include EDUC 7000 (Leadership in Education) and EDUC 7030 (Practicum in Supervision).

THE MASTER OF EDUCATION PROGRAM

Georgia Southwestern State University offers graduate study leading to the Master of Education degree for students seeking advancement in careers, additional study in a chosen field, greater personal satisfaction and financial rewards in the following areas: Early Childhood, Health and Physical Education, Middle Grades, Reading, Secondary Education and Special Education.

Several states now require the Master's degree in entry level positions. The degree also is the base for advanced study toward administrative and supervisory positions. Holders of graduate degrees are in a favorable market for prime positions in education and education-related careers.

The Master of Education degree program is designed to produce teachers who demonstrate:

  1. a commitment to students and student learning.
  2.  knowledge of the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects to students.
  3. a responsibility for managing and monitoring student learning.
  4. evaluation of their practice and learning from their experiences.
  5. their commitment as members of learning communities.

The Master of Education degree program requires a minimum of thirty-six semester hours of course work, including teaching field courses, professional core courses, and courses approved by the student's advisor. Students may select either a Thesis Option or a Directed Study Option as follows.

Directed Study Option: EDUC 7420 (3 hours) Directed Study or Field Project, and 6 hours of electives.

Thesis Option: Thesis (6 hours) and 3 hours of electives. The thesis in field courses are EDUC 741X and EDUC 741Y.

Admission Requirements for the Master of Education Program

Students seeking a degree through graduate study must apply for regular admission. Individuals who already hold a master's degree will have to meet regular admissions requirements. If these individuals have appropriate test scores, they will not have to retest. Requirements for regular admission  follow:

Regular Admission(without conditions)

(1) Undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university.
(2) An undergraduate major or from 21-27 semester hours in approved content courses in the planned graduate field of study.
(3) A minimum of 2.5 cumulative undergraduate grade point average calculated on all work attempted in which letter grades are awarded.
(4) A minimum score of 44 on the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) or a minimum score of 350 on each of the verbal and quantitative subtests with a minimum total score of 800 on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
(5) Three letters of reference.

Students seeking a degree through graduate study who do not meet the requirements for regular admission may be admitted under a conditional status. Those students admitted conditionally must meet the following requirements:

Regular Admission (with conditions)

(1) Undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university.
(2) An undergraduate major or from 21-27 hours in approved content courses in the planned graduate field of study.
(3) A minimum of 2.5 cumulative undergraduate grade point average on all work attempted in which letter grades are awarded from all institutions attended.
(4) A minimum score of 27 on the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) or a minimum score of 350 on each of the verbal and quantitative subtests with a minimum total score of 700 on the two subtests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
(5) A student may remain admitted on a conditional basis until satisfactory completion of the initial 9 semester hours of graduate work with no grade less than a B. The student then may be admitted as a regular student, subject to approval by the Dean of the School of Education.

Those students denied admission may submit an appeal of the decision. An appeal application may be obtained from any School of Education secretary.

Academic Standards (Master of Education)

Candidates for the Master of Education degree must meet the following standards.

(1) A 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale is required in all courses attempted to satisfy degree requirements.
(2) Not more than 6 hours with a grade of C may be used to satisfy degree requirements.
(3) A grade of D may not be used to satisfy degree requirements.
(4) ). In any graduate degree program, all degree requirements must be completed within seven (7) calendar years from the date of initial enrollment in course work, without regard to the initial admission status and without regard to credit hours earned.
(5) A grade of I may be given in extenuating circumstances. If a grade of I is not removed before the end of the following semester, it automatically becomes an F.

Exit Examination

All graduate degree programs in the School of Education require successful completion of the appropriate comprehensive Exit Examination(s). Students should register for the Exit exams at the beginning of their final semester of enrollment in the program.

Application for Graduation (Master of Education)

Each student admitted to a Master of Education program must file an application for graduation one semester prior to completing degree requirements. Application deadlines are as follows and application forms are available in the Registrar's Office as well as on RAIN

Graduation Term  Apply no later than of the semester prior
Fall   May 1
Spring   August 1
Summer   January 1

Early Childhood (P-5)

Students pursuing a Master's degree in Early Childhood should refer to the attached curriculum sheet for specific program requirements.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Middle Grades (4-8)

Students will select a primary concentration of 9 semester hours and a secondary concentration of 6 semester hours. Primary concentration areas are Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, or Social Science. Secondary concentration areas are  Language Arts, Mathematics, Science or Social Science.

The areas listed below can be selected as both primary or secondary concentrations:

Social Science. *EDMG 6500, courses selected from history, political science, or economics.
Mathematics. *EDMG 6600, EDMG 6610, EDMG 6650, MATH 5000, MATH 5001, MATH 5002, MATH 5003, MATH 6675, MATH 7708, MATH 7711, MATH 7790.
Language Arts. *EDMG 6100, EDMG 6120, EDMG 6200, EDMG 6210, EDMG 6280, EDMG 7110, courses in English by approval of instructor.
Science: EDMG 6400*, EDMG 6450, courses in biology, physics, earth science, and chemistry..

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Special Education

Georgia Southwestern State University offers the Master of Education Degree in the Special Education fields of Learning Disabilities, Intellectual Disabilities, and Behavioral Disorders. These graduate programs provide advanced study and research of the best practices to inservice teacher education candidates leading to certification in specific special education fields.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements (Learning Disabilities)
Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements (Intellectual Disabilities)
Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements (Behavioral Disorders)

Reading (P-12)

A Master of Education degree emphasizing Reading is available for those graduate students interested in being a reading specialist. In addition, graduate students may take Reading courses to fulfill electives in their degree programs. Graduate students who are interested in adding a Reading endorsement to their existing teaching certification successfully complete three courses in Reading (EDRG 6200, EDRG 6210, EDRG 6280) at GSW and submit appropriate documentation to the state certification office.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Health and Physical Education (P-12)

Students pursuing a Master's degree in Health and Physical Education should refer to the attached curriculum sheet for specific program requirements.

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

Secondary Education (7-12)

Students pursuing a Master's degree in Secondary Education should refer to the attached curriculum sheet for specific program requirements. Programs are offered in English, Mathematics, Sciences (Biology, Chemistry and broad field), Social Science and History.

Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.
Secondary Biology
Secondary Chemistry
Secondary English
Secondary History
Secondary Math
Secondary Science

THE SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION DEGREE PROGRAM

For positions of leadership in teaching, for advanced knowledge in the field, and personal and professional enrichment, the Specialist in Education degree provides an avenue for opportunity in public and private school systems, two-year colleges and various agencies.

The Specialist in Education degree program is designed to produce teachers who

(1) are committed to students and their learning.
(2) know the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects to students.
(3) are responsible for managing and monitoring student learning.
(4) think systematically about their practice and learn from experience.
(5) are members of learning communities.

Admission Requirements for the Specialist in Education Program

(1) Master's degree from an accredited college or university.
(2) Eligibility for Georgia T-5 teaching certificate in the same field.
(3) 3.25 overall Graduate GPA.
(4) 3 years acceptable teaching experience.
(5) A minimum score of 48 on the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) or a total of 900 on the verbal and quantitative subtests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
(6) Three letters of reference.

NOTE: There is no Regular Admission (With Conditions) to the Specialist in Education degree program.

Academic Standards (Specialist in Education)

Candidates for the Specialist in Education degree must meet the following standards:

(1) A 3.25 grade point average on a 4.0 scale is required in all courses attempted to satisfy degree requirements.
(2) No grade less than a B may be used to satisfy degree requirements.
(3) A student who earns two grades of C or less will be dropped from the program.
(4) A course where the student earned a C or less may be repeated only once.
(5) In any graduate degree program, all degree requirements must be completed within seven (7) calendar years from the date of initial enrollment in course work, without regard to the initial admission status and without regard to credit hours earned.
Exit Examination
All graduate degree programs in the School of Education require successful completion of the appropriate comprehensive Exit Examination(s). Students should register for the Exit exams at the beginning of their final semester of enrollment in the program.

Application for Graduation (Specialist in Education)

Each student admitted to a Specialist in Education program must make application for graduation one semester prior to completing degree requirements. Application deadlines are as follows and application forms are available in the Registrar's Office as well as on RAIN

Graduation Term   Apply no later than of the semester prior
Fall   May 1
Spring   August 1
Summer   January 1

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Specific Course Requirements for Early Childhood Education.
Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Specific Course Requirements for Middle Grades Education.

Teaching Field (15 hours)

The student will select a primary concentration of 9 semester hours and a secondary concentration of 6 semester hours. The primary concentration must be different from the primary concentration in the Master's program. The student will then choose a secondary concentration from another concentration area. All course work must be planned carefully with the advisor. Courses taken at the Master's level cannot be used at the Specialist level.

The areas listed below can be selected as both primary or secondary concentrations:

Social Science. *EDMG 8500, courses selected from history, political science, economics, EDMG 6500
Mathematics. *EDMG 8600, EDMG 6600, EDMG 6610, EDMG 6650, MATH 6675, MATH 7711 or MATH 7708, MATH 7790
Language Arts. *EDMG 8380, EDMG 8200, EDMG 6100, EDMG 6200 or 6210 or 6280**, EDMG 6120, courses selected from English, foreign languages
Science. *EDMG 8400, EDMG 6400, EDMG 6450, courses selected from biology, physics, earth science, chemistry.

Technology Requirement (3 hours)

EDUC 7070 Computer Applications for Curriculum and Instruction
EDUC 7100 Design and Development of Computer Based Instructional Media
EDUC 7600 Problems in Producing and Utilizing Instructional Materials
EDMG 7110 Educational Computing and Language Development

THE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE PROGRAM

The Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree program is designed to prepare future business leaders for the constantly changing world marketplace by developing their critical thinking, management and leadership skills and the global perspectives necessary for success. The convenient scheduling of courses taught by academically qualified full-time faculty makes this quality program ideal for managers seeking to gain a strong foundation in current and future business practices.

The academic program consists of a minimum of 36 graduate semester credit hours in business-related courses. The curriculum consists of eight core courses and four elective courses. Students will have the option of selecting their elective courses in accounting, management, or a combination of the courses approved by the MBA advisor. In addition, there are several prerequisite foundation courses. For applicants whose undergraduate degrees were in business-related fields, these foundation course prerequisites will typically already have been met.

Applicants whose academic record does not include the foundation courses will be required to complete these prerequisites before being admitted into the MBA program.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the graduate program in business administration is limited to holders of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution. Admission will be granted only to students showing high promise of success in graduate study. The candidate's performance on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) and the candidate's undergraduate academic record will be used to determine admission status.

The completed application packet, including all supporting documentation, must be received by the Graduate Admissions Office by the deadlines published in the University's academic calendar. Applicants may apply for admittance during any semester.

The formulas to determine the student's admission status are:

(a)     GMAT score + (200 x the student's cumulative undergraduate GPA*) or
(b)     GMAT score + (200 x the student's GPA in all upper-division undergraduate courses) or
(c)     GRE score + (200 x the student's cumulative undergraduate GPA*) or
(d)     GRE score + (200 x the student's GPA in all upper-division undergraduate courses)
*Grade Point Average (GPA) is based on a four point scale.

Regular Admission(without conditions)

Students who score 950 or higher using formula (a) or who score 1,000 or higher using formula (b) or 1,300 or higher using formula (c) or 1,350 or higher using formula (d), and who have fulfilled the prerequisite course requirements discussed below, will be admitted as a regular graduate student.

EXEMPTIONS: Applicants who have already earned a previous Master’s degree are not required to take the GMAT or GRE for admission.

Regular Admission (with conditions)

Students who score 850 or higher using formula (a) or who score 900 or higher using formula (b) or 1,200 or higher using formula (c) or 1,250 or higher using formula (d) will be admitted as conditional graduate students.

To exit conditional status, students must have completed all undergraduate prerequisite course requirements and must have maintained a minimum grade point average of 3.00 with no grade below a "B" in the first 9 semester hours of master's level courses taken while classified as a conditional graduate student. The student may then be admitted as a regular student, subject to the approval by the Dean of the School of Business.

Academic Standards

Students pursuing a Master’s degree must maintain the following standards:

  1. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better
  2. Only two courses with grades of C can be applied to the degree
  3. No course with a grade below a C will be applied toward a degree
  4. In any graduate degree program, all requirements, including course work at Georgia Southwestern State University, transfer credit and transient credit course work, must be completed within seven (7) calendar years from the date of initial enrollment in course work, without regard to the initial admission status and without regard to credit hours earned.

Each School with a Graduate Program may have other academic requirements; please check the School web site or the appropriate section of the current Bulletin.

Graduate students who fail to maintain academic standards will be placed under academic review at the end of the semester in which their status falls below the required standards.

STUDENTS UNDER REVIEW

  1. Students who have been placed under review will have early registration cancelled for the following semester. These students will not be able to register on-line and must report to their advisor.
  2. The Registrar will send the names of students under review to the Director of Graduate Studies, the Deans of each School, the Department Chairs with graduate courses,, and the graduate advisors.
  3. Students under review must meet with their advisor to develop a remediation plan to demonstrate how the student can be returned to good standing. The plan will be forwarded to the Dean of the School for his or her signature before being placed in the student’s file. A copy of the form will also be sent to the Director of Graduate Studies and to the Graduate Admissions Specialist.
  4. At the end of the probationary semester, if the student is not successful in returning to good standing, the Dean of the School, in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies, will send a certified letter of dismissal to the student with a copy to the student’s advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the Graduate Admissions Specialist.
  5. Graduate students who are dismissed from the School may write a letter of appeal within ten class days from the receipt of the dismissal letter to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Students re-admitted on appeal will have one additional semester to return to good academic standing.
  6. Re-admitted students who do not return to good standing after the initial probationary semester will be dismissed from the program and the university.
  7. Dismissed graduate students may re-apply for admission to the program after three calendar years. If the student is re-admitted, he or she must meet all requirements for the degree program at the time of re-enrollment. The years completed prior to dismissal will count towards the total seven (7) years to complete the degree. Re-admission is not automatic. Each application will be considered individually.

Application for Graduation

Each student admitted to the MBA program must make application for graduation one semester prior to completing degree requirements. Application deadlines are as follows and application forms are available in the Registrar's Office as well as on RAIN

Graduation Term   Apply no later than of the semester prior
Fall   May 1
Spring   August 1
Summer   January 1

Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements.

THE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

Georgia Southwestern State University grants the degree Master of Science in Computer Science with options in Computer Science and Computer Information Systems.

These Master of Science degree programs are designed to serve two purposes:

  • As a "Professional" program to allow computer scientists in industry to upgrade their professional skills.
  • As an "Academic" program allowing capable computer scientists to prepare for the terminal degree.

Admission Requirements for the Computer Science Option

Regular Admission (without conditions)

(1) An undergraduate degree from an accredited college.
(2) A minimum of 2.5 undergraduate cumulative GPA (based on a 4.0 scale).
(3) A minimum of 3.0 GPA on all previous graduate work attempted.
(4) A minimum total of 800 on the verbal and quantitative subtests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
(5) Three letters of reference.
(6) A Computer Science background equivalent to the following GSW classes with a minimum GPA of 3.0:
CSCI 1302 Introduction to Programming II
CSCI 2500 Discrete Structures
CSCI 3100 Introduction to Computer Organization
CSCI 3500 Data Structures and Algorithms
NOTE: Some students may be required to take additional pre-requisite courses.

Depending upon test scores and GPA, a student not meeting these requirements for regular admission may first receive Regular Admission (with conditions) to the M.S. degree program in Computer Science.

Regular Admission (with conditions)

(1) An undergraduate degree from an accredited college.
(2) A minimum of 2.2 undergraduate cumulative GPA (based on a 4.0 scale).
(3) A minimum total of 700 on the verbal and quantitative subtests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
(4) Students who are granted conditional admission will be granted regular admission status on completion of the undergraduate prerequisites and 9 semester hours of graduate course work with no grade less than a B, subject to approval by the Dean of the School of Computer Sciences.
(5) Conditionally admitted students who make a grade of C or lower on one or more of the first three graduate courses attempted will have their admission status changed to Probationary and may be dropped from the program.

Upon completion of the above requirements, the student may then apply for regular admission to the M.S. degree program in Computer Science.

Admission Requirements for the Computer Information Systems Option

Regular Admission (without conditions)

  1. An undergraduate degree from an accredited college.
  2. A minimum of 2.5 undergraduate cumulative GPA (based on a 4.0 scale).
  3. A minimum of 3.0 GPA on all previous graduate work attempted.
  4. A minimum total of 800 on the verbal and quantitative subtests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
  5.  Three letters of reference.
  6. A Computer Science/Computer Information Systems/Accounting background equivalent to the following GSW classes with a minimum GPA of 3.0:
    CSCI 1302 Introduction to Programming II
    CSCI 2500 Discrete Structures
    CSCI 3100 Introduction to Computer Organization
    CSCI 3500 Data Structures and Algorithms

NOTE: Some students may be required to take additional pre-requisite courses.

Depending upon test scores and GPA, a student not meeting these requirements for regular admission may first receive conditional admission to the M.S. degree program in Computer Information Systems.

Regular Admission (with conditions)

  1. An undergraduate degree from an accredited college.
  2. A minimum of 2.2 undergraduate cumulative GPA (based on a 4.0 scale).
  3. A minimum total of 700 on the verbal and quantitative subtests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
  4. (4) Students who are granted conditional admission will be granted regular admission status on completion of the undergraduate prerequisites and 9 semester hours of graduate course work with no grade less than a B, subject to approval from the Dean of the School of Computer Sciences.
  5. (5) Conditionally admitted students who make a grade of C or lower on one or more of the first three graduate courses attempted will have their admission status changed to Probationary and may be dropped from the program.

Upon completion of the above requirements, the student may then apply for regular admission to the M.S. degree program in CIS.

Academic Standards

Students pursuing a Master’s degree must maintain the following standards:

  1. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better
  2. Only two courses with grades of C can be applied to the degree
  3. No course with a grade below a C will be applied toward a degree
  4. In any graduate degree program, all requirements, including course work at Georgia Southwestern State University, transfer credit and transient credit course work, must be completed within seven (7) calendar years from the date of initial enrollment in course work, without regard to the initial admission status and without regard to credit hours earned.

Each School with a Graduate Program may have other academic requirements; please check the School web site or the appropriate section of the current Bulletin.

Graduate students who fail to maintain academic standards will be placed under academic review at the end of the semester in which their status falls below the required standards.

STUDENTS UNDER REVIEW

  1. Students who have been placed under review will have early registration cancelled for the following semester. These students will not be able to register on-line and must report to their advisor.
  2. The Registrar will send the names of students under review to the Director of Graduate Studies, the Deans of each School, the Department Chairs with graduate courses,, and the graduate advisors.
  3. Students under review must meet with their advisor to develop a remediation plan to demonstrate how the student can be returned to good standing. The plan will be forwarded to the Dean of the School for his or her signature before being placed in the student’s file. A copy of the form will also be sent to the Director of Graduate Studies and to the Graduate Admissions Specialist.
  4. At the end of the probationary semester, if the student is not successful in returning to good standing, the Dean of the School, in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies, will send a certified letter of dismissal to the student with a copy to the student’s advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the Graduate Admissions Specialist.
  5. Graduate students who are dismissed from the School may write a letter of appeal within ten class days from the receipt of the dismissal letter to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Students re-admitted on appeal will have one additional semester to return to good academic standing.
  6. Re-admitted students who do not return to good standing after the initial probationary semester will be dismissed from the program and the university.
  7. Dismissed graduate students may re-apply for admission to the program after three calendar years. If the student is re-admitted, he or she must meet all requirements for the degree program at the time of re-enrollment. The years completed prior to dismissal will count towards the total seven (7) years to complete the degree. Re-admission is not automatic. Each application will be considered individually.

 Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements for Computer Information Systems Option.
Click HERE for Curriculum Sheet and Requirements for Computer Science Option.

WITH A CONCENTRATION IN NURSING-MIDWIFERY

Admission requirements:

Information will be available in January 2004 regarding this program.

THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA

The University System of Georgia includes all state-operated institutions of higher education in Georgia-4 research universities, 2 regional universities, 13 state universities, 15 associate degree colleges. These 34 public institutions are located throughout the state.

A 15-member constitutional Board of Regents governs the University System, which has been in operation since 1932. Appointments of Board members are made by the Governor, subject to confirmation by the State Senate. Regular terms of Board members are seven years.

The Chair, Vice Chair, and other officers of the Board of Regents are elected by the members of the Board. The Chancellor, who is not a Board member, is the chief executive officer of the Board and the chief administrative officer of the University System.

The overall programs and services of the University System are offered through three major components: Instruction; Public Service/ Continuing Education; Research.

INSTRUCTION consists of programs of study leading toward degrees, ranging from the associate (two-year) level to the doctoral level, and certificates.

Standards for admission of students to instructional programs at each institution are determined, pursuant to policies of the Board of Regents, by the institution. The Board establishes minimum standards and leaves to each institution the prerogative to establish higher standards. Applications for admission should be addressed to the institutions.

PUBLIC SERVICE/CONTINUING EDUCATION  consists of non-degree activities, primarily, and special types of college degree-credit courses. The non-degree activities include short courses, seminars, conferences, and consultative and advisory services in many areas of interest. Typical college degree-credit courses are those offered through extension center programs and teacher education consortiums.

RESEARCH encompasses scholarly investigations conducted for discovery and application of knowledge. Most of the research is conducted through the research universities; however, some of it is conducted through several of the regional and state universities. The research investigations cover matters related to the educational objectives of the institutions and to general social needs.

The policies of the Board of Regents provide a high degree of autonomy for each institution. The executive head of each institution is the President, whose election is recommended by the Chancellor and approved by the Board.

INSTITUTIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA

BOARD OF REGENTS

University System of Georgia
270 Washington Street, S.W., Atlanta 30334-1450
Members of the Board of Regents

   Term Expires
Hugh A. Carter, Jr., Atlanta   2009
Connie Cater, Macon   2006
William H. Cleveland, Atlanta   2009
Michael J. Coles, Kennesaw   2008
Joe Frank Harris, Cartersville- Chair   2006
Hilton H. Howell, Jr., Atlanta 2004
Julie Hunt, Tifton   2004
W. Mansfield Jennings, Jr. Hawkinsville 2010
Donald M. Leebern, Jr., Atlanta   2005
Allene H. Magill, Dalton   2008
Eldridge W. McMillan, Atlanta   2003
Martin W. NeSmith, Claxton   2006
Patrick S. Pittard, Lakemont 2010
Wanda Yancey Rodwell, Stone Mountain 2005
J. Timothy Shelnut, Augusta   2007
Glenn S. White, Lawrenceville   2005
Joel O. Wooten, Jr., Columbus   2006

Officers and Staff Members
of the Board of Regents

Dr. Thomas Meredith, Chancellor
Ms. Shelly C. Nickel, Special Assistant
Ms. Gail S. Weber, Secretary to the Board 
Mr. Rob Watts, Senior Policy Advisor
Ms. Margaret Taylor, Deputy to the Senior Vice Chancellors
Dr. Daniel S. Papp, Senior Vice Chancellor, Office of Academics & Fiscal Affairs
Dr. Frank A. Butler, Vice Chancellor, Academics, Faculty & Student Affairs
Dr. Cathie M. Hudson, Associate Vice Chancellor, Strategic Research & Analysis
Dr. John T. Wolfe, Jr., Associate Vice Chancellor, Faculty Affairs
Dr. Barry A. Fullerton, Associate Vice Chancellor, Student Services
Dr. Joseph J. Szutz, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Planning
Dr. Jan Kettlewell, Associate Vice Chancellor, P-16 Initiatives , Exec. Dir., USG Foundation
Dr. Kathleen Burk, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs/Dir. Of Regents Testing
Dr. Kris Biesinger, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Advanced Learning Technologies
Mr. Randall Thursby, Vice Chancellor, Information & Instructional Technology
Ms. Beth Brigdon, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Enterprise Systems & Services
Ms. Jayne Williamson, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Library & Customer Information Services
Mr. William Bowes, Vice Chancellor, Office of Fiscal Affairs
Ms. Usha Ramachandran, Budget Director
Mr. Gerald Vaughan, Assistant Budget Director
Ms. Debra Wike, Executive Director, Business & Financial Affairs
Mr. Robert Elmore, Assistant Director, Business Services
Mr. Michael Cole, Assistant Director, Financial Services & Systems
Mr. Thomas E. Daniel, Senior Vice Chancellor, Office of External Activities & Facilities
Ms. Linda M. Daniels, Vice Chancellor, Facilities
Ms. Arlethia Perry-Johnson, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Media & Publications
Mr. Peter J. Hickey, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Real Properties
Ms. Corlis Cummings, Senior Vice Chancellor, Office of Support Services
Ms. Elizabeth E. Neely, Associate Vice Chancellor, Legal Affairs
Mr. J. Burns Newsome, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Legal Affairs (Prevention)
Ms. Robyn A. Crittenden, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Legal Affairs (Contracts)
Mr. William Wallace, Associate Vice Chancellor, Human Resources
Mr. Ronald B. Stark, Associate Vice Chancellor, Internal Audit
Dr. Lamar Veatch, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Georgia Public Library Service

HEADS OF THE INSTITUTION

1907-1908   W. C. Acree, Principal, Third District Agricultural and Mechanical School
1908-1921   John M. Collum, Principal, Third District Agricultural and Mechanical School
1921-1934   John Monroe Prance, Georgia Southwestern College
  1921-1926   Principal, Third District Agricultural and Mechanical School
  1926-1932   President, Agricultural and Normal College
 1932-1934    President, Georgia Southwestern College
1934-1948   Peyton Jacob, President, Georgia Southwestern College
1948-1950   Henry King Stanford, President, Georgia Southwestern College
1950-1963   Lloyd A. Moll, President, Georgia Southwestern College
1963-1978   William B. King, President, Georgia Southwestern College
1978-1979   Harold T. Johnson, Acting President, Georgia Southwestern College
1979-1995   William H. Capitan, President, Georgia Southwestern College
1996-1996   Joan M. Lord, Acting President, Georgia Southwestern College
1996-   Michael L. Hanes, President, Georgia Southwestern State University

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

Michael L. Hanes   President
Cathy L. Rozmus   Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dean of Faculty
C. Alan Parks   Vice President for Business and Finance
Samuel T. Miller   Vice President for Student Affairs
Steve W. Batson   Vice President for University Relations
A. Randolph Barksdale   Director of Athletics
Diane L. Kirkwood   Director of Human Resources
ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL
Oris W. Bryant, Jr.   Director of Public Safety
Clay T. Caswell   Director of Recreational Sports
Roger L. Congdon Director of Development/University Relations
Mr. Arthur B. Clark Director of Environmental Health & Safety
Lisa Cooper   Director of Institutional Research
Mary Gendernalik Cooper Dean, School of Education
Brenda Davis   Staff Benefits Manager, Human Resources
Gregory A. Davis Director, Auxiliary Services
Bobbie Duncan   Director, Continuing Education
Etrat Fathi Director, Career Services Center
David Haigler   Deputy Director of Rosalynn Carter Institute
Gaye S. Hayes   Dean of Students, Interim Director of Admissions
Anthony Ianno Director Information & Instructional Technology
Freida Jones   Director, Student Financial Aid
Gwendolyn Jones Coordinator, Learning Support Program
Linda Jones   Director, Academic Skills Center
Sheila Jones   Director, Campus Life
Alma G. Keita   Director, Counseling Services
W. Cody King   Comptroller
John G. Kooti   Dean, School of Business Administration
Lynn P. Larsen   Director, Georgia Youth Science and Technology
Don C. Lee   Director of Asian Studies
C. Angelia Moore   Director, Graduate Studies
Terry L. Morris Postal Service Supervisor
Michelle W. Parnell Director, Alcohol and Drug Awareness
Boris V. Peltsverger   Dean, School of Computer and Information Sciences
Svetlana Peltsverger   Webmaster/Server Administrator
Lynda Lee Purvis   Associate Dean of Academic Services
Nancy Rooks   Director of Procurement
Darcy Schraufnagel   Director of Residence Life
George L. Smith Director of Physical Plant
John T. Spencer, Jr.   Director of Student Support Services
Stephen L. Stanfield   Director, Small Business Development Center
Wesley D. Sumner   Director of Public Information
Ronda C. Talley   Executive Director, Rosalynn Carter Institute
Monica Taylor   Director, Student Health Services
R. Gene Thomas   Director of Upward Bound
Michael Tracy   Associate Director Public Safety
Donja Tripp   Director of Student Accounts
Lori A.Urbani   Registrar
Angela Walker   Director for Minority and Multicultural Affairs
Maria R.Warda   Dean, School of Nursing
Janis C. Warren   Director of Materials Management
Vera Weisskopf   Director, James Earl Carter Library

FACULTY

Ervin AndersonAssistant Professor, Mathematics, Learning Support
BS, Savannah State College; MEd, Georgia Southwestern College
Daniel R AskrenAssociate Professor of Geology / Chair, Department of Geology and Physics
BS, Beloit College; MS, PhD, University of Georgia
James E BagwellProfessor, History
BS, University of Georgia; MA, Georgia Southern College; PhD, University of Southern Mississippi
A Randolph BarksdaleAssistant Professor/Director, Athletics
BS, North Georgia College; MEd, Georgia State University
Steve W BatsonVice President for University Relations
BA, Mercer University; MED, Georgia College; EdD, University of Georgia
Herschel V BeazleyProfessor, Music
BMusEd, Florida State University; MMus, Georgia State University; EdD, University of Illinois at Urbana
Ruth BelkAssociate Professor, Business Administration
BA, Agnes Scott College; MBA, PhD, Georgia State University
C Diane BradleyAssistant Professor, Library
BA, University of Alabama; MSLS, University of Tennessee-Knoxville; MA, Hardin-Simmons University
Ian M BrownAssistant Professor, Biology
BS, PhD, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
Queen H. BrownTemporary Assistant Professor, Education
B.S.and M. Ed., Georgia Southwestern State University; Ed.S., Albany State University
Thedis S. BryantAssistant Professor, Library
B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.L.I.S., Louisiana State University
Burchard D CarterProfessor, Geology
AB, West Georgia College; PhD, West Virginia University
Jacqueline L CasonAssistant Professor, Nursing
AA, Georgia Southwestern College; BSN, Georgia State University; MSN, Valdosta State University
Katherine M CheliniAssistant Professor/Midwifery Director, Nursing
ADN, Olympic College; BSN, University of North Florida; MN, University of Florida
O Jay Cliett, IIIProfessor, Mathematics
BS, MA, EdD, University of Georgia
Karen S CookInstructor, Computer and Information Sciences
BS, MS, Georgia Southwestern State University
Patricia C CookAssistant Professor, Nursing
ADN, Georgia Southwestern College; BSN, Medical College of Georgia; MN, Emory University
Mary Gendernalik CooperDean and Professor, Education
B.A., Michigan State University, MAT, PhD., Wayne State University
Miles A. CooperTemporary Assistant Professor of Political Science
BA, Auburn University; MA, PhD, University of Florida.
Ellen M CotterAssociate Professor, Psychology
BA, University of Virginia; MA, PhD, University of Alabama-Birmingham
Lee Ann DalzellAssociate Librarian/Associate Professor, Library
BA, Western Kentucky University; MSLS, University of Kentucky
Sandra D DanielAssociate Professor, Nursing
BSN, Georgia Southwestern College; MSN, Valdosta State College
Barry O DavisHead Baseball Coach/Instructor, Health & Human Performance
BS, Bridgewater College; MEd, Frostburg State University
Bryan P DavisAssociate Professor, English
BA, University of Dayton; MA, Wright State University; PhD, Ohio State University
Barbara L DeStefanoProfessor, English
BA, MA, PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara
Stefan DietersAssistant Professor, Physics
BS, Monash University, Melbourne; PhD, University of Tasmania
Julia J DormineyAssociate Professor, Education
BS, MS, EdS, Valdosta State College; PhD, Florida State University
Myra DunnAssociate Professor Early Childhood Education
B.A., University of Queensland; M.Ed., PhD., University of New England
Leisa R EasomAssociate Professor, Nursing
BSN, MSN, Valdosta State College
Margaret A EllingtonAssistant Professor, English
BS, Weber State University; MS, PhD, Utah State University
M Michael FathiAssociate Professor, Business Administration
BS, University of Jundi; MBA, University of Baltimore; DBA, Nova Southeastern University
Gary D FiskAssistant Professor, Psychology
BA, Luther College; PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Janet E FosterAssociate Professor, Early Childhood Education
BA, University of West Florida; MEd, University of New Orleans; PhD, University of Minnesota
Steven E GalatasAssistant Professor, Political Science
BA, Ouachita Baptist University; MA, Vanderbuilt University; PhD, University of Missouri
Jeffrey GreenAssociate Professor, Dramatic Arts
BS, MFA, Ohio University
M Elizabeth GurnackAssistant Professor, Chemistry
AAS, William Rainey Harper College; BS, University of Illinois at Chicago; PhD, University of Minnesota
Richard C HallProfessor of History / Chair, Department of History and Political Science
BA, Vanderbilt University; MA, PhD, Ohio State University
Michael L HanesPresident
BS, MS, PhD, Indiana University
Stephanie G HarveyAssistant Professor, Biology
BA, Wesleyan College; MS, Georgia College and State University, Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Greg M HawverProfessor, Health and Human Performance
BSE, Georgia Southern University; MEd, Georgia Southwestern College; EdD, University of Mississippi
Jon M HayInstructor, Health and Human Performance
BS, Northwest Missouri State University; MS, Valdosta State College
Gaye S HayesDean of Students
BS, Georgia Southwestern College; MEd, University of Georgia
Michelle R HaywoodHead Women's Volleyball Coach/Instructor
Health and Human Performance; BS, University of Iowa; MS Georgia Southwestern State University
Robert E HerringtonProfessor and Chair, Department of Biology
BA, University of Evansville; MS, Georgia College; PhD, Washington State University
Brian HeshizerAssociate Professor, Business Administration
B.A., Columbus State University; M.A., Florida State University; Ph. D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
Sherian F HodgesTemporary Assistant Professor, Mathematics
BA, Agnes Scott College; MSA, Georgia Southwestern State University
Curtis C HowellAssistant Professor, Business Administration
BS, MAS, EdD, Northern Illinois University
Nancy K HuntAssociate Professor, Nursing
BSN, MEd, Georgia Southwestern College
David J HunterAssistant Professor, Education
BS, Bowie State University; MEd, Georgia Southwestern State University
Anthony IannoDirector, Information and Instructional Technology
B.S., M.S., PhD., Southern Illinois University
Harold IsaacsProfessor, History
BS, MA, PhD, University of Alabama
Lucja M. IwanskaAssociate Professor, Computer and Information Sciences
M.S., Moscow Institute of Technology; PhD., University of Illinois at Urbana-
Champaign
Debra P JohnsonAssistant Professor/Director of Clinical Experiences, Education
BA, Columbia College; MEd, Georgia Southwestern State University; EdS, University of Sarasota
E Joseph JohnsonAssistant Professor, French
BA, The Citadel; MA, University of South Carolina; PhD, University of Florida
Thomas R JohnsonProfessor of Sociology / Chair, Department of Psychology and Sociology
BA, MS, Kansas State College; PhD, Oklahoma State University
Gwendolyn JonesAssistant Professor of English / Chair, Department of English and Foreign Languages / Chair, Learning Support Programs
BS, Troy State University; MA, University of South Alabama; PhD, Florida State University
Linda P JonesDirector, Academic Skills Center
BA, MS, Fort Valley State College
William G KlineProfessor, Political Science
BA, MA, PhD, University of Texas at Austin
Doyin C KoloAssistant Professor, Education
BA, University of Lagos; MEd, PhD, University of South Carolina
John G KootiDean/Professor, Business Administration
MS, PhD, Michigan State University
Richard I. KopecTemporary Assistant Professor of Biology
BA, Indiana University (Political Science); BA, Indiana University (Biology); MPA, Indiana State University; MS, PhD, University of Houston.
Elizabeth A. KuipersAssistant Professor, English
B.A., Wesleyan College; M.A., Ph.D., Auburn
Charles A LawsonAssistant Professor, Art
BA, St Leo University; MFA, Georgia Southern University
Kristen L LawsonAssistant Professor, Learning Support Reading
BS, University of Georgia; MEd, Georgia Southern University
Don C LeeProfessor, Anthropology
BS, MA, George Peabody College; PhD, University of Georgia
Chen-Miao LinAssistant Professor, Finance
B.B.A., National Central University; M.B.A., Virginia Commonwealth University;
PhD., Georgia State University
Rickey H MaddenAssistant Professor, Business Administration
BS, Erskine College; MBA, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; PhD, University of Georgia
Judith M MalachowskiAssociate Professor, Nursing
BSN, Duquesne University; MSN, MPA, West Virginia University; PhD, University of Virginia
Raymond P MannilaTechnical Coordinator, Dramatic Arts
BS, Northern Michigan University; MA, Michigan State University
Leslie B MashburnAssistant Professor, Reading
BS, MS, Georgia Southwestern State University
Marcia A MayoAssistant Professor, Early Childhood Education
BSHE, Georgia College; MEd, EdS, Georgia Southwestern State University; EdD, University of Georgia
J YeVette McWhorterAssociate Professor, Education
BS, Austin Peay State University; MA, University of New Mexico; EdD, University of Georgia
Leigh R MeddersAssistant Professor, Early Childhood Education
BS, Georgia Southern University; MEd, Mercer University; EdS, Troy State University
Julie E MegginsonAssistant Professor of Music / Chair, Department of Fine Arts
BME, MA, Eastern Michigan University; DMA, University of South Carolina
Samuel T MillerVice President of Student Affairs
BA, MA, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; MEd, PhD, Mississippi State University
Diane L MixonAssistant Professor, Nursing
BSN, Valdosta State College; MSN, Medical College of Georgia
C Angelia MooreDirector Graduate Studies/ Professor, English
BSEd, University of Georgia; MA, Middlebury College; EdD, University of Georgia
Barbara S MorrisAssociate Professor, Business Administration
BA, Emory University; MAcc, PhD, University of Georgia; CPA; CIA
Nancy T MorrisAssociate Professor, Nursing
BS, Georgia Southwestern College; MPH, MSN, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Carl D MuellerAssociate Professor, Mathematics
BS, MS, University of Illinois; PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison
James R Neale, IIIAssociate Professor, Education
BA, MEd, University of Florida; PhD, University of Tennessee
Virgil M NicholsAssociate Professor, Education
BA, University of West Florida; MS, Iowa State University; PhD, University of Southern Mississippi
Elena B. OdioProfessor, Spanish
B.A., Troy State University; M.A., D.C.T., University of Miami; M.A., Ph.D., University of Arkansas
C. Alan ParksVice President for Business and Finance
B.S., University of Florida; M.P.A., M.B.A., Valdosta State College; D.B.A., Argosy University-Sarasota
Samuel T. PeavyAssistant Professor, Geology
B.S., McNeese State University; M.Sc., Memorial University of Newfoundland; Ph.D., Virginia Tech
Boris V. PeltsvergerDean/Associate Professor, Computer and Information Sciences
 M.S.E.E., Ph.D., Chelyabinsk State Technical University
Michael J. PrewettAssociate Professor, Psychology
 B.S., East Carolina University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia
Lynda Lee PurvisAssociate Dean for Academic Services
 B.S.Ed., University of Georgia; M.A., University of Alabama
John W. RhodesAssistant Professor, Education
 B.S., Florida State University; M.S., Troy State University; Ph.D., University of Florida
Glenn M. RobinsAssistant Professor, History
 B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.A., East Tennessee State University; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi
Laurel J. RobinsonProfessor, Art
B.F.A., M.F.A., University of Cincinnati
Cathy L. RozmusVice President for Academic Affairs
 B.S.N., West Virginia University; M.S.N., Vanderbilt University; D.S.N., University of Alabama at Birmingham
Victoria A. SapkoAssistant Professor, Mathematics
 B.A., Concordia College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Arvind C. ShahAssociate Professor, Computer and Information Sciences
 M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia
Paul D. ShapiroAssistant Professor, Sociology
 B.F.A., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; M.A., PhD., University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Bonnie J. SimmonsAssistant Professor, Nursing
 Diploma, Piedmont Hospital; B.S.N., Georgia Southwestern College; M.S.N., Valdosta State University
Michele L. SmithAssistant Professor of Chemistry
 BS, Wilson College; PhD Candidate, Auburn University
Cheryl R. SpaniolTemporary Assistant Professor, Dramatic Arts
 B.A., M.A., Morehead State University
Frank J SpaniolAssociate Professor, Health and Human Performance
BUS, MA, Morehead State University; EdD, University of Mississippi
Judith W SpannProfessor, Education
BS, MEd, West Georgia College; PhD, Florida State University
Stephen L StanfieldDirector, Small Business Development Center
BS, Auburn University; MS, Central Texas University; MEd, Georgia Southwestern State University
Gabriele U StaufAssociate Professor, English
BS, Texas Lutheran College; MA, Southwest Texas State University; PhD, Florida State University
Rosa M StokesHead Women's Basketball Coach/Instructor,
Health and Human Performance, BS, Cumberland University; MA, Tennessee Technological University
John J StroylsAssociate Professor and Chair, Department of Mathematics
AB, West Virginia University; PhD, State University of New York at Buffalo
Philip I SzmedraAssistant Professor, Economics
BA, Pennsylvania State University; MS, PhD, University of Georgia
Ronda C TalleyProfessor/Executive Director, Rosalynn Carter Institute
EdS, University of Louisville; PhD, Indiana University; MPH, Johns Hopkins University
Mohammed Y TalukdarAssociate Professor, Accounting
B Com, M Com, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh; PhD, The City University, London, UK
Monica R TaylorDirector, Student Health Services
BSN, Valdosta State University; MSN, Albany State University
Gregory D ThomasAssistant Professor, Chemistry
BS, PhD, Binghamton University
Lori A UrbaniRegistrar
BA, MA, Duquesne University
Michael A UrdaProfessor, Psychology
BA, Gannon College; MA, Kent State University; PhD, George Peabody College
Laura L VanceAssociate Professor, Psychology/Sociology
BA, MA, Western Washington University; PhD, Simon Fraser University
Milton Jeffrey WaldropAssociate Professor, English
BA, MA, Florida State University; PhD, University of Mississippi
Maria R WardaDean/Professor, Nursing
BSN, Catholic University of Puerto Rico; MS, Texas Women's University; PhD, University of California San Fransisco
Lettie J WatfordAssociate Professor, Education
BA, Tift College; MEd, Georgia Southwestern College; EdS, PhD, University of Georgia
Thomas J WeilandProfessor, Geology
BS, East Carolina University; MS, PhD, University of North Carolina
Vera J WeisskopfAssociate Professor, Library
BA, Oberlin College; MAS, University of Alabama-Huntsville; MLS, University of Alabama
Charles R WellsAssistant Professor, Art
AAA, Cisco Junior College; BFA, Midwestern State University; MFA, Texas Christian University
Thomas L WheelerAssistant Professor, Mathematics, Learning Support
BA, Georgia Southwestern State University; BS, Southern Methodist University; MA, MEd, Eastern New Mexico University, MSA, Georgia Southwestern State University, MBA, Georgia Southwestern State University
Jacqueline WillisAssociate Professor, English, Learning Support
BSEd, Albany State College; MEd, Georgia Southwestern College
Mary E WilsonProfessor, Business Administration
BA, MA, University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa; PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham
LaVerne G WorthyAssociate Professor, Psychology/Sociology
BS, Georgia Southwestern State University; MS, PhD, Auburn University
J Thomas WrightProfessor/Russell &Margaret Thomas Chair, Biology
BS, Columbus College; PhD, Emory University
William J WysochanskyProfessor and Chair, Department of Chemistry
BSC, PhD, Memphis State University
Aleksandr M YemelyanovAssociate Professor,Computer and Information Sciences
MS, Moscow State University; DSc, Supreme Certification Board under the Council of Ministers of the USSR; PhD, Computing Center under the Academy of Science of the USSR

 

Millard E AgertonAssistant Professor Emeritus, Chemistry
AB, Mercer University; MS, PhD, University of Georgia (1968-1979)
Daniel D Arden, JrProfessor Emeritus, Geology
AB, MS, Emory University; PhD, University of California (1970-1982)
Clifton A BaxterProfessor Emeritus, Computer Information Systems
BS, MEd, Georgia Southern College; EdS, EdD, University of Georgia (1972-1991)
Mary Elizabeth BlackshearAssistant Professor Emerita, Education
BS, Albany State College; MEd, Georgia Southwestern College (1973-1995)
John B BlountAssistant Professor Emeritus, History
BS, Georgia Southern College, MA, EdS, George Peabody College for Teachers (1964-1984)
Michael E BohleberAssociate Professor Emeritus, Business
BA, MA, University of Georgia; PhD, University of Wisconsin (1981-1996)
Fred H BoskaProfessor Emeritus, Education
BME, MME, PhD, Florida State University (1970-1993)
Martha S BuhlerProfessor Emeritas, Nursing
BSN, Northwestern State College; MSN, University of Florida; EdD, Auburn University (1971-1997)
Frank L Butler, JrAssistant Professor Emeritus, Physics
Junior College Diploma, Georgia Southwestern College; BSEE, Georgia Institute of Technology (1962-1983)
William H CapitanPresident Emeritus
BA, University of Michigan; MA, PhD, University of Minnesota (1979-1995)
A Dickson CarrollProfessor Emeritus, Education
BS, Georgia Southern College; MEd, EdD, Auburn University (1973-1994)
Sara Nell CarrollAssociate Professor Emerita, Nursing
BSN, MN, Emory University (1973-1992)
Dowe P CarterProfessor Emerita, Chemistry
BS, MEd, EdD, University of Georgia (1967-1989)
Jack C CarterProfessor Emeritus, Biology
BS, Davidson College; MEd, EdD, University of Georgia (1967-1995)
Bob C ClarkProfessor and Director of Athletics Emeritus, Physical Education
BSE, MSE, State College of Arkansas; EdD, University of Arkansas (1969-1992)
HE CoferProfessor Emeritus, Geology
AB, MS, Emory University; PhD, University of Illinois (1966-1988)
Gwendolyn S CreswellAssociate Professor Emerita, Director Library Services
BS, East Tennessee State University; MLS, Emory University (1970-1998)
Reginald L ComerAssistant Professor Emeritus, French
BS, MEd, University of Georgia (1970-2000)
Wayne B CountsProfessor Emeritus, Chemistry
BS, Furman University; PhD, University of North Carolina (1969-2001)
Thomas B DanielVice President for Business & Finance Emeritus
BBA, University of Georgia (1966-1991)
Ned R DeJournettProfessor Emeritus, Music
BA, Marshall University; MM, Northwestern University; PhD, Florida State University (1982-1996)
Rosella DerisoAssociate Professor Emerita, Nursing
BSN, Medical College of Georgia; MN, Emory University (1964-1980)
William B DragoinProfessor Emeritus, Psychology
BS, Troy State University; MS, Auburn University; PhD, George Peabody College (1972-1999)
Charles K EwingProfessor Emeritus, Biology
BS, University of Georgia; MS, University of Massachusetts (1946-1980)
David L EwingProfessor, Physics
AB, Mercer University; MEd, EdD, University of Georgia (1966-1993)
June Brooks EwingProfessor Emerita, Education
BS, MEd, EdD, University of Georgia (1967-1992)
James E. FairclothAssociate Professor Emeritus, Business
B.S., M.S., Florida State University, C.P.A., Georgia. (1969-1994)
William H. FischProfessor Emeritus, Business
B.B.A., Texas A&M University; M.B.A., Georgia College; C.P.A., Georgia. (1975-1997)
Lynn H. FrisbieProfessor &Division Chair Emeritus, Education
B.S., M.S., Kansas State College; Ed.D., University of Arkansas. (1969-1994)
John H. Gore AssociateProfessor Emeritus, English
A.B., Wayne State University; M.A., University of Denver; Ph.D., Wayne State University. (1966-1982)
J. Hubert GreeneProfessor Emeritus, Business
B.S., Berry College; M.S., Ed.D., New York University. (1950-1981)
John F. HenryDean Emeritus Academic, Business
B.S., Auburn University; M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; Ph.D., University of Alabama. (1986-1996)
Kenneth M. Huddleston AssistantProfessor Emeritus, Economics
B.S., Georgia Institute Technology; M.B.A., Georgia State University. (1970-2001)
Duke W. Jackson, Jr.Professor Emeritus, Music
B.M., M.M., D.M., Florida State University. (1970-1999)
Harold T. JohnsonVice President for Academic Affairs/ Dean of the Faculty Emeritus
B.A., Troy State; M.D.Ed., Ed.D., Auburn University. (1968-1984)
Evelyn L. JonesRegistrar Emerita
B.S., M.Ed., Georgia Southwestern College. (1969-1986)
Frank B. Jones ProfessorDivision Chair Emeritus, Computer and Applied Sciences
B.S., M.S., University of Georgia; Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology. (1968-1994)
William B. KingPresident Emeritus
B.S., Georgia Southern College; M.Ed., University of Georgia; Ph.D., New York University. (1963-1978)
Jose J. Larraz AssistantProfessor Emeritus, English
B.S., Central University; M.A., University of Miami; Dr. of Law, University of Havana. (1971-1982)
Don C. LeeProfessor Emeritus, Psychology
B.S., M.A., George Peabody College; Ph.D., University of Georgia. (1973-1996)
Shirley F. LitwhilerAssociate Professor Emerita, English
B.A., Mississippi State College for Women; M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Auburn University. (1968-1998)
Frank M. LoweryProfessor Emeritus, History
B.A., Birmingham-Southern College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Alabama. (1968-2001)
John P. MankerProfessor Emeritus, Geology
B.A., M.A., University of South Florida; Ph.D., Rice University (1975-1999)
Bobbye L. McCarterAssociate Professor Emerita, Associate Librarian
B.A., B.S., Texas Women's University; M.A., Lousiana State University; M.A.L.S., University of Missouri. (1987-1998)
Jacqueline A McKinneyProfessor Emerita, Business
BS, Troy State College; MS, EdD, Auburn University (1967-1990)
Max T McKinneyProfessor Emeritus, Mathematics
BS, Troy State College; MEd, EdD, Auburn University (1964-1990)
Rebecca L McNeillAssociate Professor/Director of Financial Aid Emerita
BSEd, MEd, University of Georgia (1967-1992)
Bruce A MiddlebrooksProfessor Emeritus, Education
BS, Centenary College; MEd, Northwestern State University; EdD,
Northeast Louisiana University (1973-1994)
H Lamon MoatesProfessor Emeritus, Psychology
BA, Furman University; BD, Southern Seminary; MEd, Furman University; EdD, Auburn University (1969-1994)
Carl E NilesAssociate Professor Emeritus, English
AB, MA, EdD, University of Tennessee (1965-1983)
Jack NortonAssistant Professor Emeritus, English
BS, MA, Appalachian State University (1966-1998)
Alexander A PalamiotisProfessor Emeritus, Political Science
BA, MA, GCIR, PhD, University of Utah (1960-1985)
Joseph P ParkerAssistant Professor Emeritus, History
BS, Clemson College; MA, University of Rhode Island (1962-1978)
Rebecca W ParksAssistant Professor Emerita, Business
BS, University of Georgia; MA, George Peabody College for Teachers;
Professional Degree, Columbia University (1968-1984)
Henry W PeabodyProfessor Emeritus, English
BA, Emory University; MA, University of Georgia; PhD, University of Denver (1972-1997)
Edgar F PetersonProfessor Emeritus, Education
BS, EEd, Auburn University; EdD, University of Alabama (1967-1993)
Ondee RavanProfessor Emerita, English
AB, Brenau College; MA, EdD, University of Georgia (1968-1994)
Richard P ReeseProfessor Emeritus, Education
BS, Auburn University; MEd, EdD, University of Southern Mississippi (1966-1994)
Ruth RolandAssociate Professor Emerita, Political Science
BA, Northeastern University; MA, PhD, New York University (1966-1990)
James W RussellProfessor &Division Chair Emeritus, Biology
BS, MEd, EdD, University of Georgia (1965-1994)
Ora Jane SawyerAssociate Professor Emerita, Business Education
BS, Georgia College at Milledgeville; MS, University of Tennessee; EdS,
University of Georgia (1961-1989)
Helen H SlaughterAssociate Professor Emerita, Assistant Librarian
BS, Jacksonville State College; MEd, Auburn University (1969-1999)
Kent M SoleAssociate Professor Emeritus, Political Science
BA, MA, West Virginia University (1966-2000)
Mildred C TietjenAssociate Professor &Associate Dean Emerita
AB, Berry College; MALS, George Peabody College for Teachers (1964-1994)
William L TietjenProfessor Emeritus, Biology
BS, University of Georgia; PhD, University of Tennessee-Knoxville (1967-1998)
Allen D ToweryAssociate Professor Emeritus, English
BA, Delta State College; MA, PhD, University of Mississippi (1970-1998)
J Terrell TurnerAssistant Professor Emeritus, Mathematics
BS, Troy University; MEd, University of Georgia (1967-1991)
Sarah Anne UlmerAssistant Professor Emerita, Nursing
BS, East Tennessee State University; MSN, Medical College of Georgia (1970-1980)
Raymond WestraProfessor Emeritus, Biology
BA, Calvin College; MA, University of North Carolina; PhD, University
of Georgia (1968-1990)
Mary M WhiteProfessor Emerita, Education
BA, Newberry College; MEd, EdD, University of Georgia (1978-1992)
Mary A WhittProfessor Emerita, English
BS, MS, Jacksonville University; PhD, University of Alabama (1969-2000)
Jerry F WilliamsVice President Emeritus of Academic Affairs/Professor
Emeritus of Mathematics, BS, MS, PhD, Auburn University (1970-1997)

Campus Map

Campus Map

INDEX

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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UNDERGRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

LEARNING SUPPORT MATH 
ACCOUNTING  (ACCT)
ACADEMIC SKILLS
ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)
ART (ARTC, ARTF, ARHS, ARST, ARTX)
BIOLOGY (BIOL)
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BUSA)
CAREER SERVICES  (CAPL)
CHEMISTRY (CHEM)
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS  (CIS)
COMMUNICATION (COMM)
COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSCI)
ECONOMICS (ECON)
EDUCATION - EARLY CHILDHOOD (EDEC)
EDUCATION - MIDDLE GRADES (4-8) (EDUC)
EDUCATION - READING (EDRG)
EDUCATION - SECONDARY (7-12) (EDUC)
EDUCATION - SPECIAL EDUCATION (P-12)  (EDSP)
EDUCATION - PROFESSIONAL (P-12) (EDEC)
REGENTS' REMEDIATION
ENGLISH (ENGL)
LEARNING SUPPORT ENGLISH  (ENLA)
ENGLISH AS SECOND LANGUAGE
ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES- NURSING
FRENCH (FREN)
GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)
GEOLOGY
HISTORY (HIST)
HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE (HPER)
HUMANITIES
INTERNSHIP
JAPANESE (JAPN)
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
LIBRARY
LINGUISTICS
LEARNING SUPPORT TUTORING
LEARNING SUPPORT MATH
MATHEMATICS (MATH)
MANAGEMENT  (MGNT)
MARKETING (MKTG)
MUSIC (MUSC)
NURSING (NURS)
HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE SERVICE COURSES (PEDS)
PHYSICS  (PHYS)
POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLS)
PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)
LEARNING SUPPORT READING
SOCIOLOGY (SOCI)
SOCIAL SCIENCE (SOSC)
SPANISH (SPAN)
THEATRE (THEA)
ORIENTATION (UNIV)

LEARNING SUPPORT MATH

ACAM 0999. Intermediate Algebra.  A program of study to prepare students for MATH 1111. Enrollment is by placement on the Department of Mathematics placement test or by volunteering.  Course content includes selected intermediate algebra topics.  (3-0-3)

ACCOUNTING

ACCT 2101. Accounting Principles I (Financial). A study of the underlying theory and application of financial accounting concepts. Prerequisite: MATH 1111. (3-0-3)

ACCT 2102. Accounting Principles II (Managerial). A study of the underlying theory and application of managerial accounting concepts. Prerequisite: ACCT 2101. (3-0-3)

ACCT 3250. Intermediate Accounting I. Accounting theory and practice related to preparation and presentation of corporate financial statements in accordance with GAAP. Emphasis on acquisition of assets and services. Prerequisite: ACCT 2101 and ACCT 2102. (3-0-3)

ACCT 3260. Intermediate Accounting II. Continuation of ACT 3250 with emphasis on fixed assets, liabilities, stockholders’ equity, and investments. Prerequisite: ACCT 3250. (3-0-3)

ACCT 3270. Intermediate Accounting III. Continuation of ACCT 3260 with emphasis on special issues related to income measurement, asset and liability valuation, and recent developments in the accounting profession. Prerequisite: ACCT 3250. (3-0-3)

ACCT 3280. Cost Accounting. The basic theory and practice related to determination of cost of products and services provided by a business and providing accounting information to management. Prerequisite: ACCT 2102. (3-0-3)

ACCT 4210. Accounting Systems. Covers the theory and design of automated procedures of accumulation and reporting information with special emphasis on internal control. Prerequisite: ACCT 2102. (3-0-3)

ACCT 4230. Income Tax Accounting. An introduction to the income tax laws with emphasis on taxation of individuals. Prerequisite: ACCT 2102. (3-0-3)

ACCT 4240. Not-For-Profit Accounting. Accounting theory and practice related to non-business organizations; governments and other non-profit organizations. Prerequisite: ACCT 3260 or ACCT 3270. (3-0-3)

ACCT 4250. Advanced Cost Accounting. The study of advanced cost accounting concepts to include comprehensive standard costing techniques, activity-based costing, advanced cost management, cost management in a just-in-time environment, responsibility accounting and measuring organizational performance. Prerequisite: ACCT 3280. (3-0-3)

ACCT 4280 Contemporary Issues In Accounting. Study of accounting history, accounting theory, accounting institutions and contemporary issues in accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 3260 or ACCT 3270. (3-0-3)

ACCT 4290. Internal Controls and Auditing. A study of systems of internal accounting control in organizations, their design and evaluation; and an introduction to the basic principles and techniques of auditing. Prerequisite: ACCT 3260 or ACCT 3270. (3-0-3)

ACCT 4390. Accounting Internship. Professional accounting experience obtained by employment with a public accounting firm, a business, or other organization while under the supervision of a partner, manager, or other office of the sponsoring organization. Prerequisites: Junior standing major with overall GPA of at least 3.00 and permission of the Dean.

ACADEMIC SKILLS

ACSK 1100. Academic Skills. An academic assistance course designed to help students develop and strengthen essential study skills necessary for college survival. (3-0-3)

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 1102. Introductory Anthropology. A survey of physical and cultural anthropology covering primate evolution, hominid origins, and an analysis of past and present cultures. (3-0-3)

ANTH 1150.  World Religions. A critical examination of major world religions.  Topics include the indigenous religions of Africa and North America, Hinduism, Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shintoism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.  Emphasis will be on understanding religions in cultural and historical context. (3-0-3)

ANTH 3350. Cultural Anthropology. A study of the nature, functions, and manifestations of culture in diverse human societies. Emphasis on selected cross-cultural case studies. Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. (3-0-3)

ANTH 3353. Sex and Gender in Culture. An ethnographic survey of the concepts of sex and gender as they are applied cross-culturally. Current theoretical perspectives and the significance of biological, cultural, and symbolic factors in determining gender roles will be emphasized. Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permission of the instructor. (3-0-3)

ANTH 4401. The American Indian. A survey course on the cultural characteristics of the diverse native Americans. Emphasis is placed upon the North American Indians. Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. (3-0-3)

ANTH 4410. Social Organization. An examination of the function and structure of kinship developmental processes in band, tribal, peasant, and industrialized societies. Illustration of inter- and intra-societal variation, and data for construction of formal models of process and variation in kinship systems will be explored. Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. (3-0-3)

ANTH 449A. Special Topics in Anthropology. A course on selected issues, problems, and literature in anthropology. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chair. (3-0-3)

ART

ARHS 3080. Asian Art History. The purpose of this course is to provide a basic foundation of Asian art, religion and culture from early Neolithic times (3,500 BC) to 1900 AD. It is important to understand the religions of these areas to appreciate the art and cultural makeup of the Asian culture then and now. With this the student may obtain an understanding of these Asian cultures and appreciate them for what they are originally intended, enjoying new art forms not necessarily encountered in the western world. In addition, the great impact eastern (Asian) cultures have had on the western world will be discussed. No prerequisite. Offered Spring Semester. May be taken as an elective. (3-0-3)

ARHS 3090. Pre-Columbian-Mexican and Meso-American Art History. The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation of Pre-Columbia Art, indigenous religions, cultures, Hieroglyphic writing and mathematics. Course covers prehistoric 5,000 BC to the conquest. No prerequisite. Offered Spring Semester. May be taken as an elective. (3-0-3)

ARHS 4000. Directed Study. 2 hours

ARHS 4001. History of 19th Century Art. This illustrated lecture course deals with the images and ideas relating to the history of 19th century European and American art. The student will explore the media and methods used by artists such as David, Courbet & Monet in the creation of movements ranging from Neo-Classicism to Impressionism. In addition, the student will be versed in the formal analysis of compositional elements and principles of design employed by these artists and others in the production of their work. Prerequisite: Art Survey II, or permission from instructor. Offered Fall Semester. (3-0-3)

ARHS 4012. History of 20th Century Art. This illustrated lecture course deals with the images and ideas relating to the history of early 20th century European and American art. The student will explore the media and methods used by artists such as Picasso, Matisse and Duchamp in the creation of movements ranging from Fauvism to Cubism to Surrealism. In addition, the student will be versed in the formal analysis of compositional elements and principles of design employed by these artists and others in the production of their work. Prerequisite: Art Survey II or permission of instructor. Offered Spring Semester. (3-0-3)

ARHS 4090. Directed Study. 3 hours.

ARST 3001. Glass Blowing for Beginning Students I. Glassblowing I Beginning covers the three dimensional aspects of glass as a transparent to semi-opaque, fluid, hot, expressive medium. Open to majors and non-majors. The course may be taken as an elective by non-art majors. Prerequisite: 3D Design/Tools suggested. Offered all semesters. (3-0-3)

ARST 3010. Crafts. The study of basic craft techniques for the recreation center and art classroom. Ceramics, jewelry and related activities will be explored. The class may be taken as an elective by non-art majors. No prerequisite. (3-0-3)

ARST 3012. Glass Blowing, Intermediate II. Glass Blowing and ceramics are basically sculpture courses, only specializing in a particular material; therefore any course beyond the first course must be designed for the individual student. In the area of three-dimensional art every technique will tend to generate shapes of a particular kind, which in turn will tend to fit particular concepts. Therefore when designing a course for a student, the important thing is to establish a balance between time spent working on pure technique and time spent working on concept as it may relate to technique. Prerequisite: Beginning Glassblowing. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 3020. Jewelry/Metals. The general objectives of the course are to introduce to the student an understanding of precious and semi-precious metals and stones and their manipulation to form works generally referred to as jewelry. Emphasis will be on the proper combination of technical skill and aesthetics. No prerequisite. (3-0-3)

ARST 3021. Advanced Drawing I. It is the purpose of this course to provide the advanced drawing student with personal conceptual development using drawing methods and materials. Two main emphases will be stressed: A) Experimentation with new techniques. B) Individual pursuits as to what each student feels the necessity to communicate in his art. The direction each student pursues will dictate materials and methods. Major direction of course will be to strive for independent development of ideas and concepts in drawing which can also apply to other discipline. Prerequisite: Drawing I and II. Offered Spring Semester. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 3030. Weaving. This course involves the production of a variety of types of weaving of the off-loom type and two and four harness looms. No prerequisite. (3-0-3)

ARST 3031. Beginning Printmaking I. This course is primarily concerned with aiding students in the making of art products by existing reproductive processes. It will: (a) demonstrate and introduce the methods of printing to the students, (b) offer students the opportunity to practice the methods of printing, (c) assist the students in evaluating their performance as regards process and product. No prerequisite. Offered all semesters. May be taken as an elective. (3-0-3)

ARST 3041. Watercolor I Beginning. It is the purpose of this course to introduce to the student the techniques of traditional and new methods of watercolor. In addition, this course will encourage personal conceptual development with the use of watercolor techniques to produce highly personal and exciting watercolors. Prerequisite: Drawing I or drawing proficiency. (3-0-3)

ARST 3042. Intermediate Printmaking II. These courses are primarily concerned with advancing the student’s mastery of printmaking and establishing a personal style in the production of the making of prints. All courses are designed for the individual student and his/her interest in printmaking. Prerequisite: Beginning Printmaking. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 3071. Sculpture I for Beginning Students. This course will expose the student to a wide variety of sculptural concepts and teach analysis and solution to sculptural problems. Prerequisite: 3D Design/Tools. Offered Spring Semester. (3-0-3)

ARST 3081. Beginning Photography I. This course covers basic black and white photography. It is for the student who has never been exposed to photography. The student must have a functional 35 mm camera with manual controls of the aperture shutter to be able to control camera. No prerequisite. Offered all semesters. May be used as an elective. (3-0-3)

ARST 3082. Intermediate Sculpture II. Glass blowing, ceramics and sculpture are basically all sculpture courses, only specializing in a particular material; therefore any course beyond the first course must be designed for each individual student. Prerequisite: ARST 1041, ARST 1052, Beginning Sculpture, 3D Design Tools. Offered all semesters. (3-0-3)

ARST 3092. Intermediate Photo Exposure & Techniques II. This course is designed to provide the photography student a chance to explore black and white photography beyond the basic and into the intermediate level, that is, exploration and instruction into more advanced principles of photography and “good picture taking” (effective communication). Prerequisite: Beginning Photography. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 3141. Ceramics I, Beginning. The course is designed to teach basic ceramic techniques for the studio artist and school teacher in the areas of hand-building and wheel-throwing shape with clay. The course may be used as an elective by non-art majors. Prerequisite: none. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 3152. Ceramics II, Intermediate. This course is intermediate study in ceramic design and technology, throwing and/or hand building, concentrated study in controlling clay, and glaze behavior. Prerequisite: Beginning Ceramics. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 3181. Beginning Graphic Design I/Computer Graphics. An introductory course in Graphic Design that deals with skill and techniques required of a professional graphic designer, in addition to working with the reproductive processes, job assembly, and mark up for reproduction. A basic course for a student who hopes to major in Graphic Design. Prerequisite: Basic computer knowledge. May be taken as an elective. (3-0-3)

ARST 3241. Beginning Painting I. It is the purpose of this course to provide the beginning painting student with various methods involved in oil painting, as well as to initiate an imaginative approach to conceptual ideas using oils as the vehicle of expression. Students will gain the understanding that painting involves a great deal of thought. Prerequisite: Drawing I or II. Offered all semesters. (3-0-3)

ARST 3252. Intermediate Painting II. It is the purpose of these advanced courses to provide the advanced student of painting with instruction and time to develop personal conceptual direction using painting and multimedia techniques. Two main emphases will be stressed: A) Further experimentation with oils as well as possible introduction to acrylics; experimentation with combining painting, drawing, collage, etc.; and methods and materials to enhance individual ideas and communicative impact. B) Development of personal concept. Prerequisite: Beginning Painting. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4003. Photo Communications III: Creative Photography. This course is for people who have mastered the basic darkroom techniques. It is designed to introduce the student to new photographic techniques and to stimulate their creativity in the darkroom. Prerequisite: Beginning Photography. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4004. Advanced Sculpture IV. Glass blowing, ceramics and sculpture are basically all sculpture courses, only specializing in a particular material; therefore any course beyond the first course must be designed for each individual student. Prerequisite: Intermediate Sculpture II. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4014. Photographic Illustration IV. This course is for people who have mastered the basic darkroom techniques in black & white and color. It is designed to introduce the student to the areas of Advertising and Commercial Photography. Prerequisite: Beginning Photography. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4023. Glass Blowing, Advanced III. Glass Blowing and ceramics are basically sculpture courses, only specializing in a particular material; therefore any course beyond the first course must be designed for the individual student. In the area of three-dimensional art every technique will tend to generate shapes of a particular kind, which in turn will tend to fit particular concepts. Therefore when designing a course for a student, the important thing is to establish a balance between time spent working on pure technique and time spent working on concept as it may relate to technique. Prerequisite: Beginning Glassblowing. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4025. Photography V. The course is designed to allow the advanced photography student to use all their knowledge experience to create a portfolio of quality photographs which will enable them to present a senior exhibition of photography and have their portfolio ready to present to prospective employers for employment or graduate school. Prerequisite: At least 6 hours in photography. Offered all semesters. (3-0-3)

ARST 4032. Advanced Drawing II. It is the purpose of this course to provide the advanced drawing student with personal conceptual development using drawing methods and materials. Two main emphases will be stressed. A) Experimentation with new techniques. B) Individual pursuits as to what each student feels the necessity to communicate in his art. The direction each student pursues will dictate materials and methods. Major direction of course will be to strive for independent development of ideas and concepts in drawing which can also apply to any other discipline. Prerequisite: Drawing I and II. Offered Spring Semester. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4034. Glass Blowing, Advanced IV. Glass Blowing and ceramics are basically sculpture courses, only specializing in a particular material; therefore any course beyond the first course must be designed for the individual student. In the area of three-dimensional art every technique will tend to generate shapes of a particular kind, which in turn will tend to fit particular concepts. Therefore when designing a course for a student, the important thing is to establish a balance between time spent working on pure technique and time spent working on concept as it may relate to technique. Prerequisite: Beginning Glassblowing. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4052. Watercolor II Advanced. Advanced watercolor is primarily concerned with advancing the student’s mastery of water-based painting materials and establishing a personal style in the area of watercolor. These courses are designed for the individual and his/her personal interests in the field of watercolor. Prerequisite: Beginning Watercolor. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4053. Advanced Printmaking III. These courses are primarily concerned with advancing the student’s mastery of printmaking and establishing a personal style in the production of making prints. All courses are designed for the individual student and his/her interest in printmaking. Prerequisite: Beginning Printmaking. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4064. Advanced Printmaking IV. These courses are primarily concerned with advancing the student’s mastery of printmaking and establishing a personal style in the production of the making of prints. All courses are designed for the individual student and his/her interest in printmaking. Prerequisite: Beginning Printmaking. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4092. Graphic Design, Illustration for Reproduction. This course has been designed to give advertising art majors the opportunity to explore various types of illustration and several techniques which are applicable in this field. It is also set-up to provide students with projects that, when completed, should be of portfolio quality. The course will focus on illustration used for book covers, magazines, short stories, textbooks, and scientific drawings. Techniques used will be pen and ink, watercolor, gouache, colored pencil, scratch board, and various combinations of media, including computer graphics programs. Prerequisite: Drawing course or drawing skills. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4093. Advanced Sculpture III. Glass blowing, ceramics and sculpture are basically all sculpture courses, only specializing in a particular material; therefore any course beyond the first course must be designed for each individual student. Prerequisite: ARST 1041, ARST 1052, Beginning Sculpture, 3D Design/Tools. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4163. Ceramics III, Advanced. The course is advanced study in ceramic design and technology, throwing and/or hand building, concentrated study in controlling clay, and glaze behavior. Prerequisite: Beginning Ceramics. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4174. Ceramics IV, Advanced. The course is advanced study in ceramic design and technology, throwing and/or hand building, concentrated study in controlling clay, and glaze behavior. Prerequisite: Beginning Ceramics. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4263. Advanced Painting III. It is the purpose of these advanced courses to provide the advanced student of painting with instruction and time to develop personal conceptual direction using painting and multimedia techniques. Two main emphases will be stressed: A) Further experimentation with oils as well as possible introduction to acrylics; experimentation with combining painting, drawing, collage, etc.; and methods and materials to enhance individual ideas and communicative impact. B) Development of personal concept. Prerequisite: Beginning Painting. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARST 4274. Advanced Painting IV. It is the purpose of these advanced student of painting with instruction and time to develop personal conceptual direction using painting and multimedia techniques. Two main emphases will be stressed: A) Further experimentation with oils as well as possible introduction to acrylics; experimentation with combining painting, drawing, collage, etc.; and methods and materials to enhance individual ideas and communicative impact. B) Development of personal concept. Prerequisite: Beginning Painting. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARTC 1100. Art Appreciation. This illustrated lecture course deals with ideas and images that introduce basic art theory, art practice and art history. The student will explore the concept “art”; media and methods used by artists; and analysis of compositional elements and design principles employed by artists in the creation of their work. No prerequisite. Offered all semesters. Part of core curriculum, Area C. (3-0-3)

ARTF 1010.  Beginning Drawing I.  It is the purpose of this course to provide the beginning student with instruction in basic skills, techniques, materials necessary for a fundamental experience in beginning drawing, as well as to initiate construction of imaginative conceptual exploration at the introductory level.  No prerequisite.  Offered Fall Semester.  (3-0-3)

ARTF 1011.  Beginning Drawing II, Figure.  It is the purpose of this course to provide the beginning student with instruction in basic skills, techniques, materials necessary for a fundamental experience in beginning figure drawing, as well as to initiate construction of imaginative conceptual exploration at the introductory level.  Prerequisite:  Beginning Drawing I (ARTF 1010) or equivalent college course.  Offered Spring Semester.  (3-0-3)

ARTF 1020.  2D Design Concepts/Color. The purpose of this course is to explore the basic fundamentals of design and color theory, ideas and concepts as they relate to the producing of art. This course is designed to prepare the student for upper-level art courses. No prerequisite. Offered Spring Semester. (3-0-3)

ARTF 1030.  3D Design/Tools.  Three Dimensional Design/Tools gives the student a working knowledge of the basic principles of three dimensional design as they apply to functional and non-functional art form. In addition, it gives the student a practical knowledge of hand tools, power tools, and welding equipment. No prerequisite. Offered Fall Semester. (3-0-3)

ARTF 2061. Art History Survey I, Prehistoric Through Medieval Art. This illustrated lecture course deals with ideas and images that introduce art theory, art practice and art history. The student will explore the concept “art”; media and methods used by artists; how to analyze a work of art; and major movements of the Prehistoric and Medieval worlds along with ideas that relate them to history. No prerequisite. Offered Fall Semester. May be taken as an elective. (3-0-3)

ARTF 2072. Art History Survey II, Renaissance Through Contemporary Art. This illustrated lecture course deals with ideas and images that introduce art theory, art practice and art history. The student will explore the concept “art”; media and methods used by artists; how to analyze a work of art; and major movements of the Renaissance through Modern worlds along with ideas that relate them to history. No prerequisite. Offered Spring Semester. May be taken as an elective. (3-0-3)

ARTS 4010. Senior Exhibition/Thesis. Senior Exhibition/Thesis represents the student’s art exhibition and writing of a senior thesis to fulfill senior exit requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree, the Bachelor of Arts Degree, and the Bachelor of Science Degree in Art Education. One semester hour. Offered all semesters.

ARTS 4020. Seminar Study. 2 hours

ARTS 4030. Seminar Study. 3 hours

These courses will be used for multi-disciplinary projects such as a combination of Dance, Theatre, Music, and Visual Art. In these courses there may be an individual working on a single project, a group of students working on a singular project, or an entire class working on a single project, all under the instructor’s supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of the supervising instructor. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit.

ARTX 4060. Senior Seminar. This is a two hour credit course designed to give the department an opportunity to measure the achievements of its senior students and to allow the senior students, through group discussion and observation, to gain an overview of their roles in the department as individuals and as seniors. Prerequisite: Student must be senior level. Offered Spring Semester. (2-0-2)

ARTXStudio Study. 2 semester hours. These courses are independent study courses in studio art disciplines. It implies a degree of maturity, self-reliance, imagination, and technical competence for the student to complete his/her study. Prerequisite: Permission of supervising instructor. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (2-0-2)

ARTX 4071       Drawing and Painting                   ARTX 4075       Printmaking

ARTX 4072       Ceramics                                      ARTX 4076       Photography

ARTX 4073       Glassblowing                                 ARTX 4077       Graphic Design

ARTX 4074       Sculpture                                      ARTX 4078       Crafts

ARTXStudio Study. 3 semester hours. These courses are independent study courses in studio art disciplines. It implies a degree of maturity, self-reliance, imagination, and technical competence for the student to complete his/her study. Prerequisite: Permission of supervising instructor. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit. (3-0-3)

ARTX 4081       Drawing and Painting                   ARTX 4085       Printmaking

ARTX 4082       Ceramics                                      ARTX 4086       Photography

ARTX 4083       Glassblowing                                 ARTX 4087       Graphic Design

ARTX 4084       Sculpture                                      ARTX 4088       Crafts

These courses are independent study courses in the more traditional academic form research such as Art History or Art Criticism. These courses require a degree of maturity, self-reliance, imagination, and technical competence for the student to complete the study. Prerequisite: Permission of supervising instructor. Offered all semesters. May be taken 3 times for credit.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 1107 & 1108. Essentials of Biology. A two semester sequence which provides a survey of the principles of modern biology including cell structure and function, respiration and photosynthesis, gene structure and function, genetics, evolution, diversity of living things, plant and animal systems, and ecology. The courses satisfy Core Area D non-laboratory science option  only, unless taken concurrently with BIOL 1107L and BIOL 1108L, Essentials of Biology Laboratory. Prerequisites: None for BIOL 1107; BIOL 1107 is prerequisite for BIOL 1108. BIOL 1107 taught Fall Semester and Spring Semester; BIOL 1108 taught Spring Semester. (3-0-3)

BIOL 1107L & 1108L. Essentials of Biology Laboratory. An introduction to the principles of biology through experiment and demonstration. Require simultaneous enrollment in (or previous successful completion of) BIOL1107 & 1108 to satisfy Core Area D laboratory science option. Prerequisites: None for BIOL 1107L; BIOL 1107 is prerequisite for BIOL 1108. BIOL 1107L is taught Fall Semester and Spring Semester; BIOL 1108L is taught Spring Semester. (0-2-1)

BIOL 1500. Applied Botany. This course is designed to provide the non-biology major with an introduction to vascular plant anatomy and basic life processes and with plants of the world that have horticultural interest. The emphasis is on the “why” of gardening techniques rather than “how- to” but the student should acquire much practical information. Meets Core Area D requirement as a non-laboratory science. Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 or permission of instructor. Taught Spring Semester. (3-0-3)

BIOL 2030. Human Anatomy & Physiology I. A study of the basic components of human anatomy and physiology approached from molecular, cellular, tissue, and system levels. Systems covered in this course include the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Taught Fall Semester. (3-2-4)

BIOL 2040. Human Anatomy & Physiology II. A study of the basic components of human anatomy and physiology approached from a molecular, cellular, organ, and system levels. Systems covered in this course include the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive systems. Taught Spring Semester. (3-2-4)

BIOL 2050. Microbiology. A study of elements of microbiology, giving a general knowledge of microorganisms as related to the problems of nursing and health. Prerequisite: BIOL 2030 or permission of instructor. Two lectures and two labs per week. Taught Spring Semester. (3-4-4)

BIOL 2107 & 2108. Principles of Biology I and II. A two semester sequence designed to give pre-health professional students and biology majors the basic fundamentals of biological sciences. Prerequisites: None for BIOL 2107; BIOL 2107 is a prerequisite for BIOL 2108. 3 lectures and 3 hour lab per week. 2107 taught Fall Semester, 2108 taught Spring Semester. (3-3-4)

BIOL 2450 and 2460. Biological Techniques I and II. These courses are designed to provide beginning biology students with skills that will increase success as practicing biological scientists. Skills developed include biological literature review, data analysis and presentation, and introduction to basic biological instrumentation. Courses open to biology majors and by permission of Chairperson of Department of Biology. Courses should be taken prior to, or concurrent with, Principles of Biology. 2450 - Fall Semester, 2460 - Spring Semester. Must be taken in sequence. (0-3-1)

BIOL 3000. Advanced Botany. An introduction to the anatomy and morphology of organisms traditionally considered plants with an emphasis on how anatomy and morphology reflect the phylogenetic relationships of oxygen producing photoautotrophs and the fungi. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology II or equivalent. Taught Spring Semester of odd numbered years. (2-3-3)

BIOL 3020. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. A comparative study of the selected systems and body regions of representative vertebrates to provide foundational material in anatomy, evolution, and development. Laboratory emphasis is on the gross anatomy of Necturus, Squalus, and Felis domesticus. Prerequisite: BIOL 2108 or equivalent. Taught Fall Semester of odd numbered years. (2-4-4)

BIOL 3050. Developmental Biology. Early embryological development of vertebrates and some invertebrates, including a study of germ cells, fertilization, cleavage, differentiation, and the origin of organ systems. Emphasis is on molecular mechanisms controlling key developmental precesses. Prerequisites: BIOL 2108 or by permission of advisor. Taught Spring Semester of even numbered years. (3-3-3)

BIOL 3100. Cell and Molecular Biology. A study of the structure and function of cells. General topics include ultrastructure, metabolism, cell cycle, and cell-cell interactions. Throughout the course, special emphasis is placed on current related trends in molecular biology. Prerequisites: BIOL 2108, CHEM 1212 with CHEM 3301 desirable. Taught Fall Semester of odd numbered years. (2-3-3)

BIOL 3150. Human Pathophysiology. A study of the physiological changes and states associated with disease. Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology I and II. This course cannot be used to satisfy one of the required or elective courses in the biology major program. Taught Fall and Spring Semesters. (3-0-3)

BIOL 3300. Economic Botany. An introduction to the uses of plants and plant products by human beings from prehistory to genetically engineered crops and bioremediation of toxic wastes. Demonstrations provide hands-on experience with topics including plant gums and resins, essential oils, fibers, dyes, spices, and staple plant foods from around the world. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology II or equivalent or permission of instructor. Taught Fall Semester of even numbered years. (2-2-3)

BIOL 3400. Bacteriology. A general study of bacteria with an introduction to some fundamental concepts and techniques. Prerequisites: Two semesters of introductory (general) biology plus two semesters of organic chemistry or the equivalent. Taught Fall Semester of even numbered years. (2-4-3)

BIOL 3410. Advanced Bacteriology. A further study of basic principles of bacteriology with emphasis on applied bacteriology including environmental, industrial, and medical bacteriology plus principles of immunology. Prerequisites: BIOL 3400 or equivalent. Taught Spring Semester of odd numbered years. (2-4-3)

BIOL 3600. Entomology. A study of morphology, physiology, and the natural history of the common insects plus techniques of collecting, identifying, and preserving insects. Prerequisite: BIOL 2108. Taught Fall Semester of odd numbered years. (2-2-3)

BIOL 3710. Field Botany. An introduction to the local flora, particularly of conifers and of flowering plants, with an emphasis on field recognition and the use of keys. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology II or equivalent or permission of instructor. Taught Spring Semester of even numbered years. (2-2-3)

BIOL 4000. Biology Seminar. A course in which the student conducts literature research on a biological topic and makes a one hour presentation. Taken during senior year. Course is used for departmental assessment and includes an assessment exam. Taught Fall Semester. (0-3-1)

BIOL 4010A. Biology Seminar I.  A course in which the student will propose, develop, and complete a hands-on research project under the supervision of a faculty member within the Department.  The culmination of the semester will be the submission of a research paper, suitable for submission for publication.  Taught Fall Semester each year.  (0-0-2)

BIOL 4010B.  Biology Seminar II.  Course which is a continuation of BIOL 4010A.  Each student will prepare a summary of, and make an oral presentation on, the research project undertaken in BIOL 4010A.  Course is used in Departmental assessment and includes an exit exam and an exit interview.  Taught Spring Semester each year; taken senior year.  (0-0-1)

BIOL 4050. Ecology. An introduction to the study of ecological principles, including population, community, and ecosystem ecology and conservation biology. Prerequisites: BIOL 2108, CHEM 1212, CHEM 1212L. Taught Spring Semester. (3-3-4)

BIOL 4100. Biological Resources. A course in which the student develops a portfolio of biological resources for use in preparing for professional examinations and/or use in teaching biology. Will require extensive use of printed materials as well as on-line/technological resources plus extensive computer knowledge. Prerequisites: BIOL 2108 plus 10 additional upper division in biology or permission of instructor plus CIS 1000. Taught Summer term of odd numbered years. (0-6-3)

BIOL 4200. Genetics. A study of modern genetics including Mendelian, molecular, and population genetic principles. Experiments with model organisms will constitute a major portion of lab. Prerequisite: BIOL 2108. Taught Fall Semester. (2-3-3)

BIOL 4300. Plant Physiology. An introduction to the life processes of plants with an emphasis on angiosperms. Topics include water relations, mineral nutrition, control of growth and development, and the biochemistry of photosynthesis with a brief consideration of plant “secondary” metabolism (production of alkaloids, aromatic oils, gums, resins, etc.). Prerequisites: Principles of Biology II or equivalent with Organic Chemistry II desirable. Taught Fall Semester of odd numbered years. (3-3-4)

BIOL 4350. Natural History of the Vertebrates. The classification and natural history of the vertebrates with an emphasis placed on native species. Laboratories involve the identification of native fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and mammals. A representative collection of vertebrates is required. Prerequisite: BIOL 2108, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Taught Spring semester of odd numbered years. (2-3-3)

BIOL 4400. Animal Physiology. A study of the cellular and systemic functions of animals, with emphasis on the mammal. Prerequisites: CHEM 3301, CHEM 3301L, BIOL 2108. Taught Fall Semester of even numbered years. (2-4-4)

BIOL 4500. Aquatic Biology. A laboratory and field course emphasizing the habitats and organisms of aquatic environments. Special consideration given to local freshwater invertebrates. Consideration also given to human impact on aquatic systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 2108, CHEM 1212, CHEM 1212L. Taught Spring Semester of odd numbered years. (2-3-3)

BIOL 4750, 4760. Special Problems. Two directed study courses designed to provide the advanced student with an opportunity to make an independent investigation in an area of special interest. Prerequisites: (1) recommendation of advisor and instructor, (2) written prospectus, and (3) permission of department head. These courses must be requested and approved in advance of registration. It is recommended that only one be taken per semester. (0-2-2)

BIOL 4800. Herpetology. The study of the classification, distribution and life histories of reptiles and amphibians, primarily those of North America. Laboratory and field work involve practice in classification, techniques of collection and preservation of museum specimens, and the study of local forms in their natural habitats. Prerequisite BIOL 2108 or the equivalent or permission of the instructor. Taught Spring Semester of even numbered years. (2-2-3)

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

BUSA 1105. Introduction To Business. An integrative study of the functional areas of business (finance, operations, marketing, human resources, etc.). Prerequisite: none. (3-0-3)

BUSA 2010. Microcomputer Applications In Business. This course is designed to provide an introduction to the use of microcomputer applications in business. The course will emphasize the use of the spreadsheet and the database and the integration of these in case applications of analysis for business decisions. Prerequisite: Computer Literacy (CIS 1000 or examination) (3-0-3)

BUSA 2040. Personal Business. A broad survey of all aspects of personal financial management, analyzing problems of everyday money matters such as budgeting, consumer protection, making major purchases, insurance, taxes, wills, and trusts. Prerequisite: none. (3-0-3)

BUSA 2050.  Internet and E-Commerce Concepts.  This course is designed to provide understanding of the evolving Internet technologies and to explore the business implications of these technologies.  Prerequisite:  None.  (3-0-3)

BUSA 2105. Communicating In The Business Environment. Theory and practice in the use of correct, forceful English in the composition of business letters, reports, and other written communication found in the business world. Prerequisite: ENGL 1102. (3-0-3)

BUSA 2106. The Environment Of Business. An introduction to the legal, regulatory, political, social, ethical, cultural environment, and technological issues which form the context for business; to include an overview of the impact of demographic diversity on organizations. Prerequisite: None. (3-0-3)

BUSA 3050. Business Statistics. Designed to provide the student with the ability to understand the basic tasks of statistics and to develop a working knowledge of the concepts and principles of the basic practice of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 1111 or a mathematics course for which MATH 1111 is a prerequisite. (3-0-3)

BUSA 3060. Quantitative Management. A second course in statistics, including analysis of variance, regression analysis, nonparametric statistical tests, chi square, time series analysis, decision theory, linear programming, and inventory models. Prerequisite: BUSA 3050. (3-0-3)

BUSA 3090. Business Law. A study of contracts, negotiable instruments, bailments, common and public carriers, agencies, sales contracts, and uniform sales laws as they apply to business. Prerequisite: None. (3-0-3)

BUSA 3106.  Legal Environment  of Business.  This course provides the business student with a study of the interrelationship of law and regulation in business.  The course also covers government regulation of business activities and the legal environment within which business must operate.  (3-0-3)

BUSA 3150. Business Finance. An introduction to promotion and organization of the corporation, forms of securities issued, problems of financial administration, expansion, securing funds, reorganization, and liquidation. Prerequisite: ACCT 2101. (3-0-3)

BUSA 3900. Prior Learning Portfolio. This course is designed to evaluate knowledge that a student has gained through work, life, and learning experiences. A prior learning portfolio, a written record presented by the student documenting prior learning experiences, is used to assess prior learning. (0-V-3)

BUSA 3901. Prior Learning Portfolio. This course is designed to evaluate knowledge that a student has gained through work, life, and learning experiences. A prior learning portfolio, a written record presented by the student documenting prior learning experiences, is used to assess prior learning. (0-V-6)

BUSA 3902. Prior Learning Portfolio. This course is designed to evaluate knowledge that a student has gained through work, life, and learning experiences. A prior learning portfolio, a written record presented by the student documenting prior learning experiences, is used to assess prior learning. (0-V-9)

BUSA 3903. Prior Learning Portfolio. This course is designed to evaluate knowledge that a student has gained through work, life, and learning experiences. A prior learning portfolio, a written record presented by the student documenting prior learning experiences, is used to assess prior learning. (0-V-12)

BUSA 3904. Prior Learning Portfolio. This course is designed to evaluate knowledge that a student has gained through work, life, and learning experiences. A prior learning portfolio, a written record presented by the student documenting prior learning experiences, is used to assess prior learning. (0-V-15)

BUSA 3905. Prior Learning Portfolio. This course is designed to evaluate knowledge that a student has gained through work, life, and learning experiences. A prior learning portfolio, a written record presented by the student documenting prior learning experiences, is used to assess prior learning. (0-V-18)

BUSA 3906. . Prior Learning Portfolio. This course is designed to evaluate knowledge that a student has gained through work, life, and learning experiences. A prior learning portfolio, a written record presented by the student documenting prior learning experiences, is used to assess prior learning. (0-V-21)

BUSA 4405. Honors course in Free Enterprise. This course, through an applied approach, is designed to educate students about the value of entrepreneurship and free enterprise. Prerequisite: Junior standing, permission of instructor and a 3.0 g.p.a. (3-0-3)

BUSA 4415.  International Business Experience.  This course is designed to acquaint students with the practices of international business, to provide a framework in which to understand how culture impacts business decisions, and to involve students in assisting the local community in developing international operations.  Prerequisite:  None.  (3-0-3)

BUSA 4420. Risk Management. A study of the principles of risk management and their implications for the individual and for business. Prerequisite: BUSA 3150. (3-0-3)

BUSA 4430. Public Finance. A survey and general background in public expenditures, revenues, and fiscal administration and intervention of the public sector into national and local economies. Special attention is given to types, applications and equity aspects of taxation. The intent of the course is to provide an understanding of the impact of government intervention with special emphasis on the effects of these activities on business conditions and consumer behavior. Prerequisite: ECON 2105. (3-0-3)

BUSA 4440. Investments And Securities. A study of the principles of sound investments, including the different types of securities issued by business firms and governments, tangibles, and monetary funds. Prerequisite: BUSA 3150. (3-0-3)

BUSA 4860. Travel And Tourism Administration. An introduction to the fields of travel and tourism with emphasis on organization, motivators, marketing, and economic impact of the travel industry, particularly in Georgia. Prerequisite: MKTG 3800. (3-0-3)

BUSA 4910. Seminar In International Issues. A seminar discussing and analyzing topics of current concern in the international environment, with particular emphasis on potential effects on business activity. Prerequisite: Junior Standing or Permission of instructor.  (3-0-3)

BUSA 4940. Business Practicum. Practical experience in the conduct of special projects in business administration, resulting in the accomplishment of direct and useful activities which enhance students’ courses of study. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (0-V-3)

BUSA 4950. Business Practicum. Practical experience in the conduct of special projects in business administration, resulting in the accomplishment of direct and useful activities which enhance students’ courses of study. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (0-V-2)

BUSA 4960. Business Practicum. Practical experience in the conduct of special projects in business administration, resulting in the accomplishment of direct and useful activities which enhance students’ courses of study. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (0-V-1)

BUSA 4970. Business Internship. Practical experience gained by “employment” in the workplace and in the accomplishment of one or more special projects pertinent to the activities of the sponsoring agency or organization. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (0-V-3)

BUSA 4980. Business Internship. Practical experience gained by “employment” in the workplace and in the accomplishment of one or more special projects pertinent to the activities of the sponsoring agency or organization. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (0-V-2)

BUSA 4990. Business Internship. Practical experience gained by “employment” in the workplace and in the accomplishment of one or more special projects pertinent to the activities of the sponsoring agency or organization. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (0-V-1)

CAREER SERVICES

CAPL 1001. Career Planning.  Designed to assist students in the career decision-making process and to prepare students to select suitable academic programs that will optimize future education and employment opportunities.  Students will have the opportunity to identify, clarify and integrate  every aspect of making a career choice and to develop a strategy for implementing career decision.  Learning activities will include career assessment, career exploration and planning as well as job search techniques.  The goal is to assist students in mastering the process of planning a solid career direction, developing a sound knowledge of available resources and the tools necessary in developing chosen career fields. (1-0-1)

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 1211. Principles of Chemistry I. First course in a two semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, periodic relations, and nomenclature. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.(3-0-3)

CHEM 1211L. Principles of Chemistry Laboratory I. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1211. (0-3-1)

CHEM 1212. Principles of Chemistry II. Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and application of chemistry for science majors. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L for science majors. (3-0-3)

CHEM 1212L. Principles of Chemistry Laboratory II. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1212. (0-3-1)

CHEM 3250. Quantitative Analysis. An introduction to quantitative analytical techniques with emphasis on the theory and practice of classic wet and instrumental methods that are in general use in both research and industry. Prerequisites: CHEM 1211, 1212; MATH 1111. (3-0-3)

CHEM 3250L. Quantitative Analysis Laboratory. An introduction to quantitative analytical techniques in the laboratory with emphasis on classic wet and instrumental methods that are in general use in both research and industry.   Prerequisites:  CHEM 1211, 1212, 3250, MATH 1111.  (0-6-2)

CHEM 3301. Organic Chemistry I. The first part of a two-semester sequence devoted to the study and preparation of carbon compounds. Part one includes the study of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatic compounds, stereochemistry, and mechanisms. Corequisite: CHEM 3301L to be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: CHEM 1211 and 1212. (3-0-3)

CHEM 3301L. Organic Chemistry I Laboratory. Laboratory linked to CHEM 3301. Study of the synthesis of organic compounds and their properties. (0-3-1)

CHEM 3302. Organic Chemistry II. The second part of a two-semester sequence devoted to the study and preparation of carbon compounds. Part two includes the study of more complex functional groups and difunctional compounds. Corequisite: 3302L to be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: CHEM 3301. (3-0-3)

CHEM 3302L. Qualitative Organic Analysis Laboratory. The laboratory assignments will include the characterization and identification of unknown organic compounds. (0-3-1)

CHEM 3310. Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry. A systematic study of the atomic structure, bonding and periodic properties of the elements. Corequisite: CHEM 3310L to be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: CHEM 1212. (3-0-3)

CHEM 3310L. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. A lab linked to CHEM 3310 including the synthesis and study of the properties of inorganic compounds. (0-3-1)

CHEM 4330. Modern Organic Chemistry. A course designed to introduce students interested in organic chemistry as a profession to some of the modern theory and practice of an exciting and rewarding field. Topics will include modern synthetic and analytical methods employed by organic chemists and the theories that explain and enlarge the understanding of the art. Prerequisite: CHEM 3301 and CHEM 3302. (3-0-3)

CHEM 4350. Molecular Modeling in Organic Chemistry. An introduction to the use of computers to produce realistic models of chemical compounds based on mathematical descriptions of the atoms and the forces between them. Prerequisites: CHEM 3302 and permission of the instructor. (2-0-2)

CHEM 4401. Physical Chemistry I. A study of thermodynamics including equations of state; gas laws; first, second and third laws of thermodynamics; reversible and irreversible systems; and energy relationships. Corequisite: CHEM 4401L to be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: MATH 1120. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 2221. (3-0-3)

CHEM 4401L. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. An introduction to the techniques and methods of Physical Chemistry. (0-3-1)

CHEM 4402. Physical Chemistry II. A study of chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, and an introduction to quantum mechanics. Corequisite: CHEM 4402L to be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: CHEM 4402 and MATH 2221. (3-0-3)

CHEM 4402L. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. A continuation of the study of the techniques and methods of Physical Chemistry. (0-3-1)

CHEM 4410. Biochemistry. An introduction to the compounds, chemical reactions, and mechanisms that are important to the processes important to living organisms. The emphasis will be on the major biochemical topics of enzyme structure and function, metabolism of sugars and fats, and the chemical aspects of genetic control of living organisms. Corequisite: CHEM 4410L to be taken concurrently. (3-0-3)

CHEM 4410L. Biochemistry Laboratory. A study of techniques commonly used in biochemistry laboratories including isolation and properties of enzymes. (0-3-1)

CHEM 4450. Instrumental Analysis. An introduction to modern instrumental techniques with emphasis on those that are in general use in both research and industry. Corequisite: CHEM 4450L to be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: CHEM 2250, MATH 1113. (3-0-3)

CHEM 4450L. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory. An introduction to modern instrumental techniques in the laboratory with emphasis on application of specific methods to analytical problems. Prerequisite: CHEM 2250L. (0-6-2)

CHEM 4491. Chemistry Seminar I. A course to acquaint students with the chemical literature. Each student will prepare a written and oral presentation on some topic of interest in current chemical literature. Permission of instructor required. (1-0-1)

CHEM 4492. Chemistry Seminar II. A course to acquaint students with the chemical literature. Each student will prepare a written and oral presentation on some topic of interest in current chemical literature. Permission of instructor required. (1-0-1)

CHEM 4470. Special Problems. A two-hour directed study course designed to provide the advanced student with the opportunity to develop an interest in current topics in chemistry. Offered on demand. Permission of instructor required. (0-4-2)

CHEM 4480. Special Problems. A two-hour directed study course designed to provide the advanced student with the opportunity to develop an interest in current topics in chemistry. Offered on demand. Permission of instructor required. (0-4-2)

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS

CIS 1000. Computer Literacy. This course is a survey of common microcomputer applications with emphasis on hands-on experience of the software packages that are currently being used to support these applications. Applications software include word processors, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation graphics. Microcomputer operating systems and some basic functions of the Internet such as electronic mail, navigating the Internet and using information retrieval systems will also be discussed. Prerequisite: None. (2-0-2)

CIS 2000. Desktop Publishing and Multimedia Presentations. After the Desktop Publishing portion of this course, the student will be able to combine text and graphics on a page in a variety of formats using a desktop publishing software package. The multimedia styles covered include the use of text, sound, still images, animation, and video. An extensive hands-on approach using an authoring language, presentation software and multimedia will allow students to develop effective multimedia presentations. Prerequisite: CIS 1000. (3-0-3)

CIS 2100. Microcomputer Interfacing & Configuration. This course covers microcomputer hardware systems in interface design, configuration, upgrading, and troubleshooting.  It also covers various modern bus structures, interrupts, interface controllers, parallel and serial I/O, multimedia devices, A/D and D/A conversion, and other major peripheral interfaces. Prerequisite:  None.  (3-0-3)

CIS 2200. Internet Technologies I. The goal of this course is to provide knowledge of HTML, including creating an HTML document; viewing an HTML file in a web browser; working with tag text elements, including headings, paragraphs,, and lists; inserting special characters, lines and graphics; creating hypertext links; working with color and images; creating text and graphical tables; using tables to enhance page design; creating and working with frames; controlling the behavior of hyperlinks on a page with frames; controlling the behavior of hyperlinks on a page with frames; creating an online form; and creating a multimedia Web pge.  This course also examines computer networking and the Internet.  It discusses how computer communicate, what the Internet is, how the Internet works, and basic Internet capabilities.  Prerequisite:  None. (1-0-1)

CIS 2201. Internet Technologies II.  The goal of this course is to provide a thorough introduction to Internet scripting from both the client-and server side.  Cover Web programming concepts necessary to bridge the gap between Web programming languages and Web architecture.  Prerequisites:  CIS 2200.  (1-0-1)

CIS 2300. Business Applications Programming. This course places emphasis on program design, development, testing, implementation, and documentation of common business-oriented applications using COBOL. Discussion and application of top-down design strategies and programming techniques for designing and developing problem solutions. Coverage of language syntax, date and file structures, input and output devices and operating system facilities for implementing interactive programs for report generation, input editing, table processing, and sequential file creation and access. This course includes coverage of sequential and random access files, processing techniques, and dvelopment of programs for interactive environments. Prerequisite: None (3-0-3)

CIS 3200. Microcomputer Network Management. This course is an introduction to network management and administration.  It presents a managerial perspective of the architecture, operations, and management of distributed network systems.  There is an emphasis on design and implementation of microcomputer based network.  Topics covered in this course include:  network topology design, protocols, security configuration, administration.  Students will have hands-on experiments to create users, groups, and assign permission to users/groups.  Prerequisites:  CIS 2100.  (3-0-3)

CIS 3300. Systems Analysis, Design & Implementation I. This course provides the students with an introduction to technical and management issues in systems analysis and design.  The course covers various issues such as the SDLC model, CASE tools, the systems analyst and the different roles of a systems analyst in an organization.  It introduces students to various information gathering techniques, tools for project management, CPM, PERT charts, issues and models for sampling data sources, ER diagrams, data flow diagrams and data dictionaries.  It includes an in-depth treatment of prototyping, the role of the user in prototyping and other issues related to prototyping.  It also covers issues in decision making, process specification techniques and principles of structured design.  Prerquisite:  CSCI 1302.  (3-0-3)

CIS 3700. Information Resource Management. A course providing a broad overview of managing information system resources. This course will discuss planning, organizing, controlling, and the administration of information systems. Prerequisite: CIS 3300. (3-0-3)

CIS 4300. Systems Analysis, Design and Implementation II. In this course, a continuation of CIS 3300, students will work in teams to implement a large software project.  The course provides an in-depth treatment of  analysis and design concepts, as applied to systems development.  It introduces the student to design and analysis tools used for software development.  It covers various issues in designing effective input and outputs, data-entry procedures, designing user interfaces and a comprehensive overview of the software testing and techniques.  Related issues in protecting information in the computer systems, quality assurance, and user training are also discussed.  Prerequisite:  CIS 3300. (3-0-3)

CIS 4400. Information Storage & Retrieval. This course will discuss the data structures, techniques and algorithms needed to build information retrieval systems.  Topics will include conceptual models of Information retrieval, text operations, query languages and operations, retrieval evaluation, indexing and searching, user interface and visualization.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 3500.  (3-0-3)

CIS 4700. EDP Audit and Control. This course will discuss the fundamental concepts of information systems control and auditing.  The course content focuses on effectiveness, efficiency, and management of information systems audit function for computer-based business applications.  Prerequisiste:  CIS 3300. (3-0-3)

CIS 4900. Special Problems in CIS. This course provides students with an opportunity to study and explore current computer information systems topics not covered in any other course. Students will also have the opportunity to design and implement software systems for business environments and to expand on projects from previous classes. Prerequisite : Permission of instructor. (3-0-3)

COMMUNICATION

COMM 1110. Fundamentals of Speech. Surveys the fundamental concepts of interpersonal and public communication, including the teaching and practice of some basic skills for both communication contexts. Offered F, Sp, and some summers. (3-0-3)

COMM 1112. Video Production Practicum. Introductory level study of the process and craft of video production through application and practice. Selection by approval of instructor. May be repeated twice. (0-2-1)

COMM 1114.  Intercollegiate Forensics.  Introductory level study of the art and science of public speaking, as well as the study of oral interpretation of plays, poems and prose.  May be repeated twice.  (0-1-1)

COMM 2112. Video Production Practicum. Advanced level study of the process and craft of video production through application and practice. Selection by approval of instructor. May be repeated twice. (0-2-1)

COMM 2114.  Intercollegiate Forensics.  Intermediate level study of the art and science of public speaking, as well as the study of the oral interpretation of plays, poems and prose.  May be repeated twice.  (0-1-1)

COMM 2225.  Video Production I.  The course will introduce students to the basic skills and techniques necessary for the production of a television program.  Emphasis will be placed on videography, cameras, editing and lighting.  Students will gain hands-on experience in making a video. (3-0-3)

COMM 3110.  Interpersonal Communication.  Analysis of person-to-person communication in both theory and practice.  Primary concern is given to understanding how an individual can use verbal and nonverbal communication to improve relationships and derive maximum social rewards.  (3-0-3)

COMM 3112. Video Production Practicum. Advanced level study of the process and craft of video production through application and practice. Selection by approval of instructor. May be repeated twice. (0-2-1)

COMM 3114.  Intercollegiate Forensics.  Advanced level study of the art and science of public speaking,, as well as the study of the oral interpreation of plays, poems and prose.  May be repeated twice.  (0-1-1)

COMM 3120.  Nonverbal Communication.  Primary emphasis is given to demonstrating the value of specific kinds of nonverbal cues in communicating successfully in such real world settings as the job interview, male-female interaction, and the courtroom.  (3-0-3)

COMM 3130.  Small Group Communication.  Examines factors which affect the quality of communication and group outcomes; interpersonal and task behaviors, leadership, norms, conflict resolution and creativity.  (3-0-3)

COMM 4110.  General Semantics.  Focus is on Symbols:  how they structure and order thought and influence behavior.  Students will analyze the relations between phenomena of meaning and linguistics.  (3-0-3)

COMM 4112. Video Production Capstone. A capstone course designed to build on the student’s cumulative experiential work in the process and craft of video production through application and practice. Selection by audition or approval of instructor. (0-4-3)

COMM 4114.  Intercollegiate Forensics.  Advanced level study of the art and science of public speaking, as well as the study of the oral interpretation of plays, poems and prose.  May be repeated twice.  (0-1-1)

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 1301. Introduction to Programming I. The emphasis in this course is on problem solving and basic programming.  A high-level language will be used to explain programming structure and style.  Topics will include problem solving and algorithm development, data types, operators, control structures, arrays, functions, and program design.  Prerequisite:  None.  (4-0-4)

CSCI 1302. Introduction to Programming II. This course will continue the development of concepts introduced in CSCI 1301.  Advanced programming techniques will be emphasized.  Students will be given the opportunity to design and implement complex programs using abstract data types.  Topics will include files, switch statements, arrays and vectors, string processing, searching and sorting, structures, classes, class templates, pointers and dynamic memory management, linked lists, inheritance, stacks, queues, and recursion.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 1301.  (4-0-4)

CSCI 2100. Assembly Language Programming. This course discusses the basic computer organization of the microcomputer and its assembly programming language. Assembly fundamentals, Macro Assembler, DEBUG, I/O services, numeric processing and conversion, string processing, Macro library, and Macro structures will be covered. Prerequisite: None. (3-0-3)

CSCI 2500. Discrete Structures. This course provides a brief introduction to mathematical logic and typical proof methods, followed by a discussion of sets, functions, and relations. The course also focuses on the mathematical techniques that are frequently used in computer science like counting techniques, elementary probability theory, combinatorics, recurrence relation, and asymptotic notation. Prerequisite: MATH 1113. (3-0-3)

CSCI 3100. Introduction to Computer Organization. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of digital logic design. It covers basic combinational and sequential logic components and the design of combinational and sequential circuits. It also introduces block-level design of complex functions, ALU design, control unit design and instruction set design. Prerequisites: CSCI 2500. (3-0-3)

CSCI 3300. Concepts of Programming Languages. The course provides an introduction to the basic paradigms and techniques of imperative, functional, logic, object-oriented, and concurrent programming languages. Using illustrative examples, the student will be exposed to various programming languages representative of the above paradigms. Prerequisite: CSCI 3500. (3-0-3)

CSCI 3500. Data Structures & Algorithms. This course covers the basic data structures including stacks, queues, linked lists, heaps, and various search trees, utilizing the abstract data type approach. Recursive algorithms, and search and hashing techniques are discussed. Sorting and searching algorithms are analyzed for space and time complexities. Prerequisites: CSCI 1302, CSCI 2500. (3-0-3)

CSCI 4100. Computer Architecture. This course covers the basic concepts and design issues in the hardware design of computer systems. Block level design issues, data processing unit design, instruction set design, RISC vs. CISC issues, hardwired and microprogrammed control unit design, memory organization, the system bus structure, I/O processors and DMA / Interrupts are also discussed. Prerequisite: CSCI 3100. (3-0-3)

CSCI 4110. Introduction to VLSI Design. This course will discuss CMOS technology, circuit design, layout, and system design. The course will progress from a circuit view of CMOS IC design to a subsystem view of CMOS VLSI emphasizing the semi-custom design approach. Prerequisite: CSCI 4100. (3-0-3)

CSCI 4200. Design of Operating Systems. The course will discuss memory management, processor management, process management and deadlocks, device management, and file management.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 3100, CSCI 3500.  (3-0-3)

CSCI 4210. Data Communications & Computer Networks. This course covers fundamentals of data and computer communications theory, LAN networking concepts, Internet technology, layered protocols, network switching, distributed processing, wide area networks error detection and correction, routing algorithms, network security, topology, and management.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 4220. (3-0-3)

CSCI 4220.  Unix. The goal of this course is to provide knowledge of UNIX applications interface, guiding the student through operating system utilities including process, file, storage and I/O management.  Cover important UNIX concepts, like inter-process communication and I/O redirection, with shell commands to enhance understanding of both and to discuss Bourne and C Shell Programming.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 1301. (3-0-3)

CSCI 4300. Software Engineering. This course introduces basic software engineering principles.  The course will discuss scope of software engineering, software process, life cycle models, team organizations, testing, introduction to objects, and phases of software life cycle.  Prerequisite: CSCI 3500.  (3-0-3)

CSCI 4310. Object Oriented Programming. The important features of objects such as inheritance, interfaces, and polymorphism will be introduced.  Specific topics include systematic approach to program construction, preconditions, postconditions, and object-oriented design case studies. The students will be required to run a signficant number of programs in an object-oriented programming language.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 1302.  (3-0-3)

CSCI 4400. Introduction to Database Systems. This course will discuss the fundamental concepts necessary for the design, use, and implementation of database systems. The topics include the relational model, the relational algebra, the ER model, SQL, functional dependencies normalization, and relational design. Prerequisite: CSCI 3500. (3-0-3)

CSCI 4500. Design & Analysis of Algorithms. This course provides techniques for designing and analyzing algorithms. It covers the various types of efficiency analysis including worst-case, average, and amortized complexity. It also presents the main paradigms in the design of algorithms (divide-and-conquer, greedy, dynamic programming, backtracking) for the main classes of algorithms (sequential, parallel, probabilistic). Prerequisite: CSCI 3500. (3-0-3)

CSCI 4510. Theory of Computation. The course investigates the fundamental capabilities and limitations of computers.  It covers finite automata, regular language and sets, context-free grammars, push-down automata, and Turing machines.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 3500. (3-0-3)

CSCI 4520. Principles of Compiler Design. This course covers the basic structure of a compiler, lexical analysis, syntax analysis, symbol table management, syntax-directed translation and type checking.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 3500. (3-0-3)

CSCI 4820. Principles of Computer Graphics. This course will cover the basic principles of graphic display, algorithms and modeling.  The material is seen as a broad introduction to the scope of computer graphics.  Topics include discussion on simple graphics primitives (lines, polygons, etc.), polygon filling, 2D and 3D transformations.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 3500. (3-0-3)

CSCI 4830. Artificial Intelligence. This course provides an introduction to the problems and techniques of Artificial Intelligence. It surveys the major subdisciplines of AI, discussing such topics as problem spaces, search strategies, knowledge representation, natural language processing, expert systems and machine learning. Prerequisite: CSCI 3500. (3-0-3)

CSCI 4900. Special Problems in Computer Science. This course provides students with an opportunity to study and explore current computer science topics not covered in any other course. Students will also have the opportunity to design and implement software systems and to expand on projects from previous classes Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (3-0-3)

CSCI 4910. Junior/Senior Seminar. This course allows students to select and explore one topic from a wide spectrum of topics in the computing field and to make a class presentation on this topic. Students will gain experience in preparing and delivering a presentation to an audience of peers and in the critical evaluation of presentations. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status. (1-0-1)

CSCI 4920. Ethics in the Computing Profession. This course will first cover some types of ethical theory and codes of ethics for computer professionals. It will then discuss such topics as the responsibility and liability of software creators and software vendors, computers and privacy, computers and the distribution of power in our society, and ownership of software. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. (1-0-1)

CSCI 4930.  Internship.  The Internship gives students an opportunity to apply and extend the theoretical knowledge acquired in the classroom to a practical experience.  Prerequisite:  approval by the School of Computer and Information Sciences.  (3-0-3)

ECONOMICS

Note: Economics courses numbered 3000 and above are not open to freshmen.

ECON 2105. Principles of Macroeconomics. This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze economic aggregates and evaluate economic policies. (3-0-3)

ECON 2106. Principles of Microeconomics. This principles of economics course examines the detailed workings of a market economy.  The concepts of supply and demand are reviewed followed by their underlying structures, consumer and producer theory.  The government's role in the market as it affects public goods and common resources and the design of an efficient tax system are evaluated.  The structures of various market types are then analyzed using the perfectly competitive market as the hallmark of efficient resource allocation.  Prerequisite:  ECON 2105. (3-0-3)

ECON 3106.  Intermediate Microeconomic Theory.  This course introduces the student to the more advanced theoretic and applied principles of economics whose elementary constructs were developed in the first microeconomic theory course.  The material includes a more sophisticated approach in describing the economic decisions and issues facing the consumers, producers, and institutions that make up the market economy.  Specific topics include consumer behavior and market demand, the firm and its technology, market structure price and output determination, factor market analysis, asymmetric information, game theory, and the role of government in regulating market failure.  (3-0-3)

ECON 3330. Economic History of the United States. (3-0-3)

ECON 3510. Money and Banking. Monetary theories and role of banking institutions in capital formation, price determination, interest rates, and discount policies. Prerequisite: ECON 2105. (3-0-3)

ECON 4410. Public Economic Policy. Regulatory and fiscal policies of government agencies. Prerequisite: ECON 2106. (3-0-3)

ECON 4811. Developmental Economics.  This course analyzes the problems facing the developing world and considers alternative policies that may contribute to stimulating growth and speeding economic development in less developed countries.  Prerequisites are the successful completion of ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 or the permission of the instructor.  (3-0-3)

ECON 4900. Special Topics in Economics. A course on selected issues, problems, and literature in economics. (3-0-3)

EDUCATION - EARLY CHILDHOOD

EDEC 2400 and EDEC 2500 are prerequisites for all upper level (3000-4000 level) EDEC courses.

EDEC 2400. Foundations in Early Childhood Education. A course designed for pre-service and in-service teachers who are working or planning to work with young children.  Emphasis is placed on historical foundations of early childhood, developmentally appropriate practice, and effective programs to maximize the development of young children.  Field experience is required.  (3-1-3)

EDEC 2500.  Growth and Development for Early Childhood Education.  This course examines the growth and development of children from birth to adolescence.  Emphasis is placed on typical development and the educational implications for learning and achievement of children in grades P-5.  Major theories of development as articulated by Piaget, Vygotsky, Montessori, Erikson, Maslow, Bloom, and others are included.  (3-2-3)

EDEC 3030. Early Childhood Language Arts. The study of communication skills with emphasis on writing, listening, speaking, and thinking, as well as language history, grammar, and usage for preservice teachers in grades P-5. Emphasis on varied instructional strategies and materials for teaching language arts as an integral part of the total curriculum with attention to both creative and functional aspects of language use related to Early Childhood Education. (3-4-3)

EDEC 3100. Early Childhood Mathematics. Activity oriented course that models the discovery approach of teaching mathematics and alternative assessment measures to monitor individual and class growth. Content will feature investigations of numbers (patterns, operations, and properties), statistics-graphing, and elementary geometry. Attention also given to effective teaching practices and materials that will assist students in making the transition from student to teacher. Field experience required. (3-4-3)

EDEC 3140. Early Childhood Music. A study of the music curriculum in the Early Childhood grades with emphasis on understanding theories, principles, and activities essential for musical development at this level. (2-0-2)

EDEC 3280. Literature for Children. A study of the work of fine authors and illustrators, new and old, as well as the broad spectrum of contemporary and traditional literature for children. A practical and explicit overview of the ways in which teachers (P- 5) can evaluate and select books and involve children in literature, with specific suggestions for goals and techniques. Students will explore children's preferences and aesthetic responses to visual aspects of their books. Emphasis is on the importance of extending literature throughout the school curriculum.(3-4-3)

EDEC 3400. Curriculum for Early Childhood Education. A study of the child’s curriculum for children in grades P-5.  Topics include strategies for planning, implementing, and evaluating learning; methods for creating and supporting a constructivist learning environment; strategies for designing supportive environments for behavior; and using developmentally appropriate practices.  Current research related to "best" practices will be included.  Prerequisite:  Admission to the Teacher Education program.  Co-requisite:  EDEC 3450 and EDEC 3901.  (3-0-3)

EDEC 3450.  Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Early Childhood Education.  Course content will acquaint students with the standards recommended by the National Association for the Education of Young Children in designing and implementing effective programs for young children.  Emphasis is placed on appropriate curriculum, teaching strategies, and learning environments for children in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten.  Prerequisite:  Admission to the Teacher Education Program.  Co-requisite:  EDEC 3400 and EDEC 3901.  (3-0-3)

EDEC 3600.  Inquiry and Self Expression in Early Childhood Education.  Course content is focused on ways to support the development of skills in research, expository and creative writing, and other forms of self-expression.  Techniques for assessing the development and achievement of inquiry and self-expression are included.  Prerequisite:  EDEC 3901.  Co-requisite:  EDEC 3650 and EDEC 3902.  (3-0-3)

EDEC 3650.  Materials and Methods in Early Childhood Education.  The course will introduce materials, methods, and motivational strategies that facilitate and enhance the instruction and learning in early childhood education.  The use of literature as a resource for supporting learning and meeting the needs of diverse populations of children and individuals will be emphasized.  Course content will be applied through a directed practicum experience in a public school setting.  Prerequisite: EDEC 3901.  Co-requisite:  EDEC 3600 and EDEC 3902. (3-0-3)

EDEC 3700. Creative Arts for Teachers. A study of the role of the creative arts in the development of young children with recommended practice in qualitative curriculum planning, together with laboratory projects that identify the unique problems in elementary school art, including philosophical, motivational, and evaluative aspects. (2-0-2)

EDEC 3901. Junior 1 Practicum. A field experience with children in elementary grades. Students will observe, plan and implement instruction, and use assessment techniques to develop and strengthen their teaching skills.  Students will reflect on their success in planning , implementing, and assessing developmentally appropriate learning experiences.  Emphasis is placed on the curriculum areas of math and reading.  Prerequisite:  Admission to the Teacher Education program.  Co-requisite:  EDEC 3400 and EDEC 3450.  (0-10-1)

EDEC 3902.  Junior 2 Practicum in Early Childhood Education.  A field experience with children in elementary grades.  Students will observe, plan and implement instruction, and use assessment techniques to develop and strengthen their teaching skills.  Students will reflect on their success in planning, implementing, and assessing developmentally appropriate learning experiences.  Students will document children's achievement based on their teaching inquiry skills, self-expressive skills, and their success in addressing individual needs of children.  Emphasis is placed on the curriculum areas of mathematics, reading, and language arts.  Prerequisite:  EDEC 3901.  Co-requisite:  EDEC 3600 and EDEC 3650.  (0-10-1)

EDEC 4200.  Science in Early Childhood Education.  This course is designed to develop basic science knowledge, concepts, and skills and incorporate them into learning experiences for young children in grades P-5.  The content is drawn from a wide range of science topics.  Emphasis is placed on student involvement in science and learning experiences.  Prerequisite:  EDEC 3902.  Co-requisite:  EDEC 4250 and EDEC 4900.  (3-0-3)

EDEC 4250.   Social Studies for Early Childhood Education.  This course is a study of the social curriculum for children in grades P-5.  Objectives, concepts, content, techniques, materials, methods of inquiry, and evaluative procedures for teaching and learning in the primary grades are emphasized.  A foundation for the use of the social sciences to support learning and the integration of content across the curriculum will be provided.  Prerequisite:  EDEC 3902.  Co-requisite:  EDEC 4200 and EDEC 4900.  (3-0-3)

EDEC 4550. Assessment in Early Childhood Education. A study of appropriate strategies for assessing the learning of young children. Formal assessment strategies, authentic assessment strategies, and teacher-developed strategies are introduced. The role of assessment in accountability within the context of child and school evaluation is examined. Prerequisite: EDEC 3902. Co-requisite: EDEC 4200, EDEC 4250, EDEC 4900. (3-0-3)

EDEC 4900. Senior 1 Practicum in Early Childhood Education. A field experience in Early Childhood Education with children in grades P-2 or 3-5.  Students will observe, plan and implement instruction, and use assessment techniques to develop and strengthen their teaching skills.  Students will reflect on their success in planning, implementing, and assessing developmentally appropriate learning experiences.  Students will document children's achievement based on their teaching of science, social studies, mathematics, and reading, and their success in addressing individual needs of children. Emphasis is placed on the curriculum areas of mathematics, reading, social studies, and science.  Prerequisite:  EDEC 3902.  Co-requisite:  EDEC 4200 and EDEC 4250.  (0-10-1)

EDEC 4960. Senior 2 Practicum in Early Childhood Education. The course provides a supervised field experience in Early Childhood Education with children in grades P-5. (0-35-3)

EDEC 4970. Student Teaching in the Early Childhood Grades. Observations and teaching with emphasis on content knowledge under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected kindergarten and early elementary schools. A seminar component is included. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching.   (0-10-4)

EDEC 4980. Student Teaching in the Early Childhood Grades. Observations and teaching with emphasis on teaching skills under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected kindergarten and early elementary schools. A seminar component is included. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. (0-10-4)

EDEC 4990. Student Teaching in the Early Childhood Grades. Observations and teaching with emphasis on professionalism under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected kindergarten and early elementary schools. A seminar component is included. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. (0-10-4)

EDUCATION - MIDDLE GRADES (4-8)

EDUC 2010 is a prerequisite for all upper level (3000-4000 level) EDMG courses.

EDMG 2030. Middle Grades Growth and Development. Focuses on the examination of issues in human growth and development from conception through aging.  The physical, mental and social aspects of development at different ages will be explored and some discussion will be devoted to the application of the course material to classroom teaching.  The course is intended to assist future middle grades teachers become skilled and reflective decision-makers.  Field experience is required.  (3-1-3)

EDMG 2300. The Middle School and the Middle School Learner. A survey of the history, philosophy, and organization of the middle school. In addition, a comprehensive examination of the early adolescent learner in relation to learning theory, developmental theory and emotional growth theory. Field experiences include visits to area middle schools. (3-1-3)

EDMG 2900. Middle Grades Sophomore Practicum. A course intended to prepare prospective Middle Grades Education majors for success in gaining Admission to the Teacher Education program and meeting the specific requirements of Teacher Education, Middle Grades Education, the Middle Grades Block program, and Student Teaching. The course also includes an introduction to professionalism in teaching and notions of effective teaching in middle level schools. (1-2-1)

EDMG 3030. Middle Grades Language Arts. A course designed for preservice teachers of children in grades four through eight, and those interested in providing optimal language development for effective communication of adolescents. Field experience required. (3-3-3)

EDMG 3060. Middle Grades Science I. A course designed to develop basic science knowledge, concepts, and skills and incorporate them into activities for Middle Grades level science classes. The content is drawn from a wide range of science topics. Emphasis is placed on student involvement in science. (3-3-3)

EDMG 3070. Middle Grades Science II. A course designed to incorporate science content with teaching methodology. Emphasis is placed on developing objectives and selecting science activities which illustrate the objectives. The course requires students to prepare a unit plan and teach a few lessons. Prerequisite: EDMG 3060. Field Experience required. (3-3-3)

EDMG 3100. Middle Grades Mathematics I. Activity oriented course that models the discovery approach of teaching mathematics and alternative assessment measures to monitor individual and class growth. Content will feature investigations of numbers (patterns, operations, and properties), probability and statistics, and elementary geometry. Attention also given to effective teaching practices and materials that will assist students in making the transition from student to teacher. Field experience required. (3-3-3)

EDMG 3110. Middle Grades Mathematics II. A continuation of EDMG 3100, with learning experiences focused on topics in number theory, geometry, and algebra. Emphasis will be placed on the teaching practices that promote the learning of Middle Grades students. Field experience required. Prerequisite: EDMG 3100. (3-3-3)

EDMG 3140. Middle Grades Music. A study of the music curriculum in the Middle Grades with emphasis on understanding of theories, principles, and activities essential for development in music at this level. (2-1-2)

EDMG 3280. Literature for Children. A study of the works of fine authors and illustrators, new and old, as well as the broad spectrum of contemporary and traditional young adult literature. A practical and explicit overview of ways in which teachers (4-8) can evaluate and select books and involve students in literature, with specific suggestions for goals and techniques. Exploration of adolescent preferences and aesthetic responses to visual aspects of their books. Emphasis is on the importance of extending literature throughout the school curriculum. (3-0-3)

EDMG 3700. Creative Arts for Teachers. A study of the role of the creative arts in the development of children with recommended practices in qualitative curriculum planning, together with laboratory projects that identify the unique problems in Middle Grades art, including philosophical, motivational, and evaluative aspects. (2-2-2)

EDMG 4050. Middle Grades Social Studies. A study of the social studies curriculum with emphasis on the program in grades 4-8. Objectives, concepts, content, techniques and materials, methods of inquiry, and evaluative procedure for appropriate grade levels are stressed. (3-3-3)

EDMG 4100. Analysis and Correction of Reading Disabilities. A study in diagnostic-prescriptive reading instruction designed for the teaching of Reading in grades 4-8. Emphasis is on the use of varied diagnostic instruments, instructional procedures, and materials appropriate for use with readers requiring remediation. Field experience required. Prerequisite: EDUC 3040. (3-1-3)

EDMG 4400. Materials and Methods of Teaching in Middle Grades. A course giving attention to instructional planning, selecting, and evaluating instructional materials, evaluating and reporting on pupil progress, classroom management and discipline, performing other instructional and administrative duties related to Middle Grades classroom instruction. Prerequisites: EDMG 2030, EDMG 3300, and Admission to Teacher Education. Recommended immediately prior to Student Teaching. Field experience required. (4-4-4)

EDMG 4800. Middle Grades Senior Seminar. A capstone course taken in conjunction with Student Teaching. This course integrates the broad spectrum of engagements that aspiring middle level teachers have experienced in their academic preparation. The seminar is based on learning modules designed to provide students who are about to enter full time teaching with academic, professional, and personal skills to be an effective middle level teacher. (3-0-3)

EDMG 4970. Student Teaching in Middle Grades. Observations and teaching with emphasis on content knowledge under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected middle schools. A seminar component is included. (0-10-4)

EDMG 4980. Student Teaching in Middle Grades. Observations and teaching with emphasis on teaching skills under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected middle schools. A seminar component is included. (0-10-4)

EDMG 4990. Student Teaching in Middle Grades. Observations and teaching with emphasis on professionalism under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected middle schools. A seminar component is included. (0-10-4)

EDUCATION - READING

EDRG 3050.  Reading and Literacy I.  This course will focus on the developmental process of reading instruction, grades P-2, with an emphasis on comprehension and the creation of a literate environment.  Several models for teaching reading will be demonstrated in the course exploration of emergent literacy, world recognition, phonics, evaluation, and a variety of reading strategies specific to each area.  (3-0-3)

EDRG 4050.  Reading and Literacy II.  Formulation of a theoretical basis for practical applications of reading in the grades 3-5 classroom.  Emphasis on a critical exploration of literature, technology, and other resources with a focus on teaching reading and study skills in the content areas, instructional planning, classroom organization, and assessment.  Opportunities for observation and application with attention to meeting the literary needs of diverse learners.  Prerequisite:  EDRG 3030, EDRG 3050.  (3-0-3)

EDUCATION - SECONDARY (7-12)

EDUC 2010 is a prerequisite for all upper level (3000-4000 level) EDSC courses.

EDSC 4060. Materials and Methods for Teaching English in Secondary Schools. A preservice course giving special emphasis to theory and practice in teaching English in secondary schools. Special emphases of the course include the following: planning, selecting, and evaluating instructional materials; classroom management, group interaction, and discipline; evaluating and reporting on pupil progress; and performing other instructional duties related to high school teaching. Prerequisites: PSYC 2103, PSYC 3310, ENGL 3210, ENGL 3220, ENGL 4010, and Admission to Teacher Education. Recommended immediately prior to Student Teaching. Field experience required. (2-2-4)

EDSC 4070. Materials and Methods for Business Education Instruction. Study and evaluation of teaching materials, methods, and techniques in business education. Includes directed observation, lesson planning, and field experience in individual laboratory. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education. Recommended immediately prior to Student Teaching. Field experience required. (4-4-4)

EDSC 4080. Methods for Mathematics Teachers. An analysis of the mathematical content of grades 7-12, its organization, and presentation. Factors and activities contributing to the learning of this mathematical content will be covered. Math lab equipment, calculators, and computers will be utilized. Designed for secondary mathematics teachers. Recommended immediately prior to Student Teaching. Field experience required. Prerequisites: EDUC 2030, PSYC 3310, and Admission to Teacher Education. Offered every Fall semester. (4-4-4)

EDSC 4090. Science Methods and Materials. A course designed to help develop classroom techniques and laboratory work and daily planning for teachers of the sciences at the high school level. Prerequisites: EDUC 2010; PSYC 1010, 2103, 3310; and Admission to Teacher Education. Taught Spring semester in even numbered years. Field experience required. (4-4-4)

EDSC 4100. Materials and Methods for Teaching History and Other Social Sciences in Today’s Secondary Schools. A course designed to develop instructional skills in the secondary social science classroom. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and some teaching field courses. Ninety hours field experience required. (4-6-4)

EDSC 4111. Materials and Methods for Teaching Foreign Language in Grades P through 12. A pre-practicum course giving emphasis to theory and practice in teaching foreign language in public schools, grades P through 12. Emphases of the course are the following: planning, selecting, and evaluating instructional materials; classroom management and discipline; evaluating student progress; peer instruction; and some field experience prior to Student Teaching. Prerequisites: PSYC 2103, PSYC 3310, Advanced Conversation (FREN 4010 or SPAN 4010) and Advanced Grammar and Composition (FREN 4020 or SPAN 4020), and Admission to Teacher Education. Recommended immediately prior to Student Teaching. (2-2-4)

EDSC 4200. Foreign Language Curriculum Design. A study of the planning steps and content required for proficiency-based foreign language instruction at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and completion of two upper level foreign language courses. Field experience required. (3-0-3)

EDSC 4210. Teaching Reading in the Secondary School. An introductory course in methods and materials for developing reading skills in students in grades 7-12. Designed primarily for English majors seeking teacher certification. Field experience required. (3-0-3)

EDSC 4970. Student Teaching in Secondary School. Observations and teaching with emphasis on content knowledge under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected secondary schools. A seminar component is included. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. (0-10-4)

EDSC 4980. Student Teaching in Secondary School. Observations and teaching with emphasis on teaching skills under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected secondary schools. A seminar component is included. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. (0-10-4)

EDSC 4990. Student Teaching in Secondary School. Observations and teaching with emphasis on professionalism under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected secondary schools. A seminar component is included. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. (0-10-4)

EDUCATION - SPECIAL EDUCATION (P-12)

EDSP 2010. Introduction to Special Education. A study of the identification, characteristics, and educational needs of exceptional individuals. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 2510. Field Experiences in Special Education. Direct observation and participation in programs for exceptional individuals. (2-3-2)

EDSP 2990. Professional, Legal, and Ethical Aspects of Special Education. Explores the teacher’s commitment to local, state, and national professional organizations. Required of all Special Education majors. May be repeated for credit. (1-0-1)

EDSP 3050. Health, Physical Education, and Recreation for Exceptional Individuals. A study of principles and procedures for conducting a program of health, physical education, and recreation appropriate for school settings. Emphasis on adaptive and corrective programs for exceptional individuals. (3-0-3)

EDSP 4020. Curriculum for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities. A study of the curriculum structure and trends in the area of intellectual disabilities. Prerequisite: EDSP 4110. Field experience required. (3-3-3)

EDSP 4030. Curriculum for Individuals with Learning Disabilities. The study of curriculum structure and trends in the area of learning disabilities, including the relationships of learning disabilities to regular school curriculum. Prerequisite: EDSP 4310. Field experience required.(3-3-3)

EDSP 4050. Counseling and the Exceptional Individual. A study of principles and techniques for counseling and working with families and others involved with exceptional individuals. Prerequisite: EDSP 2010. (2-2-2)

EDSP 4060. Language Development. A study of speech and language development of young individuals with emphasis on normal languages and possible deviations. Diagnostic instruments with implications for educational methods, materials, and communication techniques are studied. Prerequisite: EDSP 2010. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 4110. Nature of Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities. A study of characteristics, identification, and education of individuals with intellectual disabilities. Prerequisite: EDSP 2010. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 4120. Materials and Methods for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities. A study of instructional materials and methods for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Prerequisites: EDSP 4110, 2010, and 2510 and Admission to Teacher Education. Field experience required. (4-2-4)

EDSP 4130. Teaching Individuals with Severe and Profound Disabilities. A study of the characteristics, nature, and education of individuals with severe/profound disabilities. Course includes materials and methods for teaching intellectually disabled, emotionally disturbed, physically disabled, and multi-disabled individuals. Field experience required. (3-1-3)

EDSP 4150. Teaching Internship in Intellectual Disabilities. Practicum in teaching individuals with Intellectual Disabilities under the supervision of a qualified classroom teacher and university supervisor. Enrollment in Special Education Bock required. (0-20-3)

EDSP 4310. Nature of Individuals with Learning Disabilities. A comprehensive study of the characteristics, diagnosis, and education of individuals with specific learning disabilities. Prerequisite: EDSP 2010. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 4320. Materials and Methods for Individuals with Learning Disabilities. A study of instructional materials and methods for teaching individuals with learning disabilities. Prerequisites: EDSP 4310, 2010, 2510, Admission to Teacher Education. Field experience required. (4-2-4)

EDSP 4350. Teaching Internship in Learning Disabilities. Practicum in teaching individuals with learning disabilities under the supervision of a qualified classroom teacher and university supervisor. Enrollment in Special Education Block required. (0-20-3)

EDSP 4410. Nature of Individuals with Behavioral/Emotional Disorders. An introduction to the definition, identification, characteristics, and education of individuals with behavioral/emotional disorders. Prerequisite: EDSP 2010 and permission of instructor. (3-2-3)

EDSP 4420. Methods and Materials for Teaching Individuals with Behavioral Disorders and Emotional Disturbances. Study of methods, materials, and curriculum for teaching individuals with emotional/behavioral disorders. Prerequisites: EDSP 2010, EDSP 4410, and permission of instructor. Field experience required. (4-2-4)

EDSP 4450. Teaching Internship in Behavioral Disorders/Emotional Disturbances. Practicum in teaching individuals with behavioral/emotional disabilities under the supervision of a qualified cooperating teacher and university supervisor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (0-20-3)

EDSP 4510. Psychoeducational Evaluation of Exceptional Individuals. Application and interpretation of formal and informal tests and measurements used in making eligibility, placement, and instructional decisions regarding exceptional individuals. Prerequisite: EDSP 2010. (3-0-3)

EDSP 4520. Collaborative Methods and Materials in Special Education. Techniques for individualization, evaluation, scheduling, and inclusion of pupils into the regular classroom. Prerequisites: EDSP 2010, 2510, and Admission to Teacher Education. Field experience required. (3-1-3)

EDSP 4620. Behavior Modification and Classroom Management. Application of educational and psychological techniques for management of learning and behavioral problems. Emphasis on use of behavior modification techniques in the school and home. Field experience required. (2-1-2)

EDSP 4910. Seminar: Readings and Special Topics in Special Education. A seminar for seniors in Special Education on selected issues, problems, and literature in the area of Special Education. Requirements individually established.  (1-0-1, 2-0-2, or 3-0-3)

EDSP 4970. Student Teaching in Special Education. Observations and teaching with emphasis on content knowledge under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in the field of intended certification. A seminar component is included. (0-10-4)

EDSP 4980. Student Teaching in Special Education. Observations and teaching with emphasis on teaching skills under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in the field of intended certification. A seminar component is included. (0-10-4)

EDSP 4990. Student Teaching in Special Education. Observations and teaching with emphasis on professionalism under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in the field of intended certification. A seminar component is included. (0-10-4)

EDUCATION - PROFESSIONAL (P-12)

EDEC 2400 or EDUC 2010 is a prerequisite for all upper level (3000-4000 level) EDUC courses.

EDUC 2010. Introduction to Education. A comprehensive overview of American Education and the teaching profession. Content focuses on teaching as a career, the historical and philosophical basis of American education, the relationship between schools and society, the structure of schools including governance, curriculum, financing, and legal provisions, and the changing role of schools and teachers. EDUC 2010 is a prerequisite for all upper level (3000-4000 level) EDUC courses. Field experience required. (3-1-3)

EDUC 2030. Child Growth and Development. A study of human growth and development from conception through aging. Field experience required. (3-1-3)

EDUC 2040. Language Arts.  The study of communication skills with emphasis on writing, listening, speaking, thinking, as well as language history, grammar, and usage for preservice teachers in grades P-12.  Field experience required.  (3-3-3)

EDUC 2800. Introduction to Educational Computing. An introduction to computer technology and the principles of using technology to enhance instruction in the classroom. Includes laboratory experiences with computers, educational courseware, portfolio presentations, and tool software. (2-0-2)

EDUC 3040. Introduction to Reading. An introductory course in the reading skills, methods, and materials for grades P-12. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDUC 3200. Audio-Visual and Technology. An introduction to a wide range of audio-visual materials and equipment available for classroom use. The course will focus on the development of skills necessary for effective audio-visual production and utilization. (3-0-3)

EDUC 3300. The Learner and the Learning Process. A survey of the learner and the learning process with emphasis on the practical application of learning principles for teachers of children in grades P-12. Field experiences include visits to area schools. Field experience required. (3-1-3)

EDUC 3500. Education of the Multicultural School Population. A course designed to acquaint the preservice teacher with the characteristics of students who represent the cultural diversity found in the public schools of today and with the techniques of developing programs to facilitate those students during the educational process. Field experience required. (2-1-2)

EDUC 4000. Senior Seminar in Teaching. A seminar for seniors in education on selected topics of classroom management, application, research and techniques. (3-0-3)

EDUC 4100. Analysis and Correction of Reading Disabilities. A study in diagnostic-prescriptive reading instruction. Emphasis is on the use of varied diagnostic instruments, instructional procedures, and materials appropriate for use with readers requiring remediation. Field experience required. Prerequisite: EDUC 3040. (3-1-3)

EDUC 4150. Problems in Classroom Management. A study of classroom problems and effective management techniques. May be repeated for credit. (1-0-1 or 2-0-2 or 3-0-3)

EDUC 4400. Materials and Methods of Teaching Physical Education. A course designed to present materials and instructional methods which will help preservice teachers of physical education gain an in-depth understanding of the teaching process related to P-12 teaching. Directed observation in the public schools is required of all students. Prerequisites: EDUC 2010; PSYC 2103, 3310; and Admission to Teacher Education. (4-4-4)

EDUC 4510. Educational Measurements and Evaluation. A basic overview of formal and informal tests and measurements used in gathering information or making decisions about students. Includes test construction, selection, interpretation, and administration. (3-0-3)

EDUC 4970. Student Teaching in Grades P-12. Observations and teaching with emphasis on content knowledge under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected elementary, middle, and secondary schools. A seminar component is included. (0-10-4)

EDUC 4980. Student Teaching in Grades P-12. Observations and teaching with emphasis on teaching skills under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected elementary, middle, and secondary schools. A seminar component is included. (0-10-4)

EDUC 4990. Student Teaching in Grades P-12. Observations and teaching with emphasis on professionalism under the direction of an approved cooperating teacher in selected elementary, middle, and secondary schools. A seminar component is included. (0-10-4)

REGENTS' REMEDIATION

ENGL 0094. Regents’ Essay Remediation. A remedial course, the purpose of which is to prepare students to write acceptable essays for the University System of Georgia Regents’ Examination. The course includes concentrated essay writing practice and an intense review of grammar. Laboratory requirement. This course is designed for those who failed to pass the essay portion of the Regents’ Examination.  (3-1-3)

ENGL 0095. Regents’ Reading Remediation. Instruction and practice in reading techniques with an emphasis on increasing reading comprehension, retention, and speed. This course is designed for those who failed to pass the reading portion of the Regents’ Examination. Laboratory requirement. (3-1-3)

ENGLISH

ENGL 1101. Composition I. ENGL 1101 is a composition course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with an emphasis on writing improvement. However, the course also seeks to strengthen critical thinking skills and the ability to read with understanding. A grade of C is required for advancement to ENGL 1102. Prerequisite: The student must meet regular entrance requirements of the college or have completed the Learning Support English requirement. (3-0-3)

ENGL 1102. Composition II. A composition course that develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101, that emphasizes interpretation and evaluation, and that incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods. A minimum grade of C is required. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in ENGL 1101 or equivalent. (3-0-3)

ENGL 2110. World Literature. A survey of important works of world literature.  Prerequisites:  ENGL 1102 passed with a grade of C or above.  (3-0-3)

ENGL 2120.  British Literature.  A survey of important works of British literature. Prerequisites:  ENGL 1102 passed with a grade of C or above.  (3-0-3)

ENGL 2130.  American Literature.  A survey of important works of American literature. Prerequisites:  ENGL 1102 passed with a grade of C or above.  (3-0-3)

ENGL 2200.  Introduction to Professional Writing.  The course is designed to help writers understand and practice writing skills as employed across the professions.  Students will be asked to master basic writing conventions and publishing procedures for journalistic, technical, managerial, creative, or scientific writing.  Prerequisite:  ENGL 1102.  (3-0-3)

Upper-level English courses specifically required for the B.A. Programs are offered on an annual basis; electives are rotated on a two or more year cycle. Contact the department office for further information. ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, and ENGL 2110, or ENGL 2120, or ENGL 2130 are prerequisites for all upper-level courses.

ENGL 3210. Advanced Grammar. The syntax and philology of the English language, recommended to students interested in teaching and writing. Prerequisite: Completion of English Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair.  (3-0-3)

ENGL 3220. Advanced Composition. A course in advanced composition with emphasis on the various methods of discourse as a basis for individual writing and for the teaching of writing. The course also includes a study of research in the teaching of writing. Recommended for students who are interested in writing and in teaching writing. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 3230. Creative Writing. A workshop course in writing and literary criticism. Recommended to students whose test scores and performance indicate above average aptitude in English. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 3240. Technical Writing. The course focuses on career oriented writing, with emphasis on the scientific, technological, and managerial areas. The course provides practice in various types of writing—such as reports, proposals, and instructions—that apply to these areas and teaches the special skills needed. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 3245. Technical Writing in a Specific Discipline. The course provides a general background in career oriented writing in science, technology, and management and focuses on writing in the particular discipline in which the student is majoring. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 3310. Backgrounds for Literature. The philosophical and psychological nature of mythology; dimensions of mythology in literature with emphasis on selected literary works. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 3320. The Bible as Literature. Offers intensive study primarily of the Old Testament, focusing on the Bible’s influence on Western thought and literature while also examining archetypal patterns, literary genres, and literary techniques found in the Bible. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 3340. The Novel. The history, development, and characteristics of the novel as a literary genre; parallel novels and literary criticism. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 3350. The Short Story. A study of selected short stories with emphasis on development of interpretive and analytical skills of the student. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 3360. Contemporary Literature: Modern Prose. This course examines modern fiction from the late nineteenth and twentieth century. Novelists and short story writers who best express modern man’s experiences are read. Dostoyevsky, Nietzche, Faulkner, Salinger, Bellow, and others are included. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 3370.  Modern Poetry. A study of some of the outstanding poets of the twentieth century with emphasis on evaluation of their poetry. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 3410. Southern Literature. A study in depth of the leading figures of the Southern Literary Renaissance, with special emphasis on the social, political, and economic conditions in the post-bellum South that led to its development. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 3420. African American Literature. Survey of literature by African American writers; emphasis on major novelists, on appreciation of the main intellectual and artistic concerns of the African American culture, and on the role of literature within that culture. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 3430 World Survey of Film Narrative. A study of a number of major film directors, the history of film-making and its techniques, and an introduction to film theory. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 3955.  Colloquium I.  Seminar for majors in the junior year of study.  Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (1-0-1)

ENGL 4010. Literature for Young Adults. A comprehensive study of young adult literature, including non-Western authors as well as literature representative of racial and ethnic groups, appropriate for students in secondary school programs, with emphasis on teaching techniques. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4020. History of the English Language. The development of the English Language from the Indo-European family of language to present-day English, both British and American. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4110. Chaucer. The man, his works, and his influence on the language. The Canterbury Tales and minor poems. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4115.  Medieval English Literature.  Focused study in an area of medieval English literature, such as Chaucer, Anglo-Saxon heroic poetry, or Arthurian literature.  Some of the course reading will be in either Old or Middle English depending upon the specific topic of the course. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4120. Shakespeare I. A study of non-dramatic and dramatic works with attention to the comedies and selected tragedies. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4125. Shakespeare II. A study of non-dramatic and dramatic works with attention to the histories, selected tragedies, and romances. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4130. English Drama to 1642. English Drama to 1642 traces the development of drama from its beginnings in medieval times to the closing of the theaters by the Puritans in 1642. Shakespeare’s plays are not included in this course. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4135.  Renaissance English Literature.  Focused study in an area of renaissance English literature, such as Spenser, the sonnet, or Jacobean drama. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4140. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century English Literature. A study of the literature of Dryden, Swift, Addison, Steele, Johnson, Goldsmith and other eighteenth-century writers. Attention is given to the philosophical and literary currents of the period. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4150. Romantic Movement in England. The works of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4160. Victorian Literature. The works of the major Victorian writers with emphasis on Tennyson and Browning. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4200.  Colonial & Federalist American Literature.  The development of American literature from its colonial beginnings through the nascent federal government; emphasis on the main intellectual currents. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4210. Romanticism in American Literature. The works of Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Hawthorne, Melville, and Poe. Prerequisite:Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4220. Realism in American Literature. The prose of Twain, Howells, James, Wharton, Crane, Steinbeck, and Hemingway, with special emphasis on the growth of the novel in America, conditions which fostered the growth of realism and its further development into naturalism. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4910. Nineteenth Century English Poetry. An in-depth study of the works of one or two major British poets. The poets to be studied will vary. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4930.  Special Topics in Women’s Literature.  A seminar on a major author or authors, movement, or theme in women’s literature.  Prerequisite:  Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair.  (3-0-3)

ENGL 4940.  Special Topics in Literature and Language.  A seminar on a major author, or authors, or theme in English studies not offered in the present catalogue of courses. Prerequisite: Completion of Core Areas C and F; or approval of the department chair. (3-0-3)

ENGL 4955.  Colloquium II.  Seminar for majors in the senior year of study.  Prerequisite:  12 hours of upper-level English courses with a C or better; or approval of department chair.  (1-0-1)

ENGL 4970. English Internship. English related internships for qualified students. Concurrent enrollment in INTN 4920 required. (0-V-3)

ENGL 4971. English Internship. English related internships for qualified students. Concurrent enrollment in INTN 4920 required. (0-V-3)

ENGL 4972. English Internship. English related internships for qualified students. Concurrent enrollment in INTN 4920 required. (0-V-3)

LEARNING SUPPORT ENGLISH

ENLA 0098, 0099.  English Language Arts.  A two-semester sequence of courses required of those Learning Support students whose performance on the placement tests indicates the need for at least one semester of basic instruction.  These courses offer instruction in reading, basic usage and grammar skills, and composition.  Students may exit after the first course or must continue in the second course.  The course may be repeated with an S (satisfactory) grade.  One hour of lab work is required.  (4-1-4)

ENGLISH AS SECOND LANGUAGE (Center for Asian Studies)

ESL 0100. Basic Writing. A course designed to introduce basic English language students to the mechanics of sentences and paragraphs with ample writing practice.

ESL 0110. Listening & Speaking I. A six-week listening and speaking course for special programs designed for basic-intermediate level students in North American English that introduces listening from a schema approach to processing language, which promotes active learning, listening, and speaking within the practiced situations.

ESL 0120. Basic Grammar. A course designed to introduce beginning non-native speakers of English to the form, meaning and usage of basic structures of English and to provide them with ample opportunities for practicing these structures.

ESL 0130. Basic Reading. A course designed to help basic students develop “top-down” reading skills, increase vocabulary, understand a bit about American culture and read for pleasure.

ESL 0200. Intermediate Writing. A six-week course for special groups designed for intermediate students. It focuses on writing skills for paragraph development.

ESL 0210. Listening & Speaking II- Idioms. A listening and speaking course for intermediate to advanced students designed to introduce and familiarize the most frequently occurring idiomatic expressions. The materials will be changed each session, so the course can be repeated.

ESL 0211. Listening & Speaking II – Pronunciation. A comprehensive, thorough overview of the American sound system to guide the intermediate-advanced English language learner in the development of clear speech and appropriate intonation.

ESL 0212. Listening & Speaking II – TOEFL. A course designed to prepare intermediate students with the skills, strategies, practice and confidence they need to increase their scores on the Listening section of the Test Of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) Test.

ESL 0213. Listening & Speaking II – Movies. A listening and speaking course for intermediate to advanced students designed to introduce and familiarize them with American culture and language through classic movies. One course for each level may be offered each session. The materials will be changed each session, so the course can be repeated.

ESL 0220. Intermediate Grammar. A course designed to present the form, meaning and usage of fundamental grammatical structures of English at an intermediate level of instruction to provide students with ample opportunities for practicing these structures.

ESL 0230. Intermediate Reading. A course designed to help intermediate students develop reading skills, increase vocabulary and speed, and read for pleasure.

ESL 0300. Advanced Writing. A six-week course for special programs designed to help advanced English as a Second Language (ESL) students improve writing skills, from preplanning to preparing final drafts. The course focuses on the development of creativity and critical thinking in writing.

ESL 0310. Listening & Speaking III– Fluency. A course designed to help high-intermediate through advanced students develop the ability to communicate more fluently and accurately by integrating listening, speaking, and pronunciation.

ESL 0311. Listening & Speaking III– Pronunciation. A course designed to develop high-intermediate through advanced students’ ability to communicate more fluently and accurately through conversation practice on specific topics in pair and group work and sometimes with native speakers/peer tutors.

ESL 0312. Listening & Speaking III– TOEFL. A course designed to prepare advanced students with the skills, strategies, practice and confidence they need to increase their scores on the Listening section of the TOEFL Test.

ESL 0313. Listening & Speaking III– Movies. A listening and speaking course for advanced students designed to teach American culture and language through classic movies. The materials will be changed each session, so the course can be repeated.

ESL 0320. Advanced Grammar- NON-TOEFL. A course for special programs designed for advanced grammar students to address those areas of English that they have not mastered and to become more fluent in both written and spoken English by learning to self-monitor.

ESL 0325. Advanced Grammar – TOEFL. A course designed to prepare advanced students with the skills, strategies, practice and confidence they need to increase their scores on the Listening section of the Test of English as a Foregin Language (TOEFL) Test.

ESL 0330. Advanced Reading. A course designed to offer advanced English as a Second Language (ESL) students opportunities to improve reading skills, vocabulary, and critical thinking, as well as to better understand American culture through the reading of classic novels and textbooks.

ESL 0400. Bridge (High-Advanced) Writing. An eight-week course for special programs and summer designed to prepare advanced ESL students to express their own ideas and incorporate other sources for support in their writing for academic classes and working positions.

ESL 0410. Listening & Speaking IV – Fluency. A course designed to help high-advanced students develop the ability to communicate more fluently and accurately by integrating listening, speaking, and pronunciation.

ESL 0411. Listinging & Speaking IV – Pronunciation. A course designed to develop high-advanced students’ ability to communicate more fluently and accurately through conversation practice on specific topics in pair and group work and sometimes with native speakers/peer tutors.

ESL 0412. Listening & Speaking IV – TOEFL. A course designed to prepare high-advanced students with the skills, strategies, practice and confidence they need to increase their scores on the Listening section of the TOEFL Test.

ESL 0413. Listening & Speaking IV – Movies. A listening and speaking course for high-advanced students to teach American culture and language through classic movies. The materials will be changed each session, so the course can be repeated.

ESL 0430. Bridge (High-Advanced) Reading. A course using academic material and classic fiction to bridge the gap between ESL students and academic work by improving and reading skills, expanding vocabulary and critical thinking skills, learning more about American culture, and by performing research for a paper (done in the writing class). This class will read different material every semester, so it can be repeated twice.

ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES- NURSING

ESPN 0101. Oral Communication for Nurses I. A listening and speaking course designed to introduce low level and intermediate ESL students to the American health care environment and to provide ample opportunity for practicing the communication skills necessary to communicate in daily life and healthcare situations.

ESPN 0301. Oral Communication for Nurses II. A course designed to prepare high intermediate and advanced ESL students to communicate effectively in healthcare work and daily life situations.

FRENCH

FREN 1001. Elementary French I. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing in French and to the culture of French-speaking peoples. Not open to students with two or more years of high school French. Designed for students with no previous knowledge of French. Not open to native speakers. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

FREN 1002. Elementary French II. Continued listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French with further study of the culture of French-speaking peoples. Prerequisite: FREN 1001 or one entrance unit in French. Not open to native speakers. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

FREN 2001. Intermediate French I. Continued emphasis in listening, speaking, reading, and writing with study of the culture of French-speaking people. Prerequisite: FREN 1002 or two entrance units in French. Not open to native speakers. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

FREN 2002. Intermediate French II. An intensive review of French grammar. Selected readings with conversations and compositions based on the reading. Prerequisite: FREN 2001 or acceptable scores on the placement test. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

FREN 3000. French Grammar & Composition. A thorough review and expansion of the main grammatical concepts, rules, and applications studies in the FREN 1001, 1002, 2001, and 2002 courses. A practical application of grammatical study through translations (English to French), formal/informal writing, some listening and speaking, and refinement of self-editing skills. This is an on-line, asynchronous WebCT course. (3-0-3)

FREN 3110. French Culture and Civilization I. A survey of the historical, sociological, philosophical, literary, and artistic developments of France up to modern times.  Conducted in French.  Prerequisite:  FREN 2002 or permission of the department chair.  This is an on-line, asynchronous Web-CT course.  (3-0-3)

FREN 3120. French Culture and Civilization II. A survey of the historical, sociological, philosophical, literary, and artistic development of modern-day France and the Francophone world.  Conducted in French.  Prerequisite:  FREN 2002 or permission of the instructor.  This is an on-line, asynchronous Web-CT course.  (3-0-3)

FREN 3510. French Literature Through the Sixteenth Century. A study of the development of French literary genres and ideas from the ninth century through the sixteenth. Special attention to Rabelais, the Pléiade, and Montaigne. Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

FREN 3520. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. A study of seventeenth century Classicism with emphasis on the theater of Corneille, Molière, and Racine. Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

FREN 3530. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Emphasis on the French philosophers Voltaire, Rousseau, Montesquieu, and Diderot. Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

FREN 3540. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Emphasis on the development and influence of French Romanticism, Parnassianism, symbolism, realism, and naturalism. Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

FREN 3550. French Literature of the Twentieth Century. A general survey of the outstanding works of drama, poetry, and prose. Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

FREN 4010. Advanced Conversation and Phonetics. An intensive study of the French phonetic system with emphasis on improving pronunciation, vocabulary, syntax, and general fluency of expression in French. Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or the equivalent. (3-0-3)

FREN 4030. The Contemporary French Novel. A brief review of the background of the development of the French novel from its earliest manifestations with the main emphasis placed on reading and analyzing approximately ten full-length twentieth century novels: Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

FREN 4040. Contemporary French Drama. An overall view of contemporary French drama with specific emphasis on reading and analyzing at least one entire play of approximately ten outstanding twentieth century dramatists. Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

FREN 4110. Advanced Grammar and Composition. A detailed and comprehensive coverage of the structure of French grammar. Emphasis on grammatical analysis, oral and written drills, translation, and compositions. Conducted in French.  Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or permission of the department chair. This is an on-line, asynchronous Web-CT course.  (3-0-3)

FREN 4210.  Business French.  An introduction to the economic and business practices of contemporary France and the Francophone world.  Conducted in French.  Prerequisite:  FREN 2002 or permission of the department chair.  This is an on-line, asynchronous Web-CT course.  (3-0-3)

FREN 4950, 4960, 4970. Study Abroad. An intensive study of French language and culture in the native environment. Designed for students who participate in the University System approved programs or in any other comparable program for which approval has been given prior to the study abroad. Up to 9 hours of credit may be given upon successful completion of the program. Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or the equivalent.

GEOGRAPHY

Note: Geography courses numbered 3000 and above are not open to freshmen.

GEOG 1101. Introduction to Human Geography. A survey of global patterns of resources, population, culture, and economic systems. Emphasis is placed upon the factors contributing to these patterns and the distinctions between the technologically advanced and less advanced regions of the world. Not open to students with prior credit in SOSC 1101. (3-0-3)

GEOG 4550. Problems in Political Geography. A study of the impact of geography on world politics. (3-0-3)

GEOG 4800. Geography of the Western Hemisphere. An analysis focusing on significant physical features, people, resources, and problems of North and South America. (3-0-3)

GEOG 4820. Geography of Latin America. Significant physical features, population groups, economic resources and activities, and effects of geographic factors on Latin American development. (3-0-3)

GEOG 4830. Geography of Europe and Russia. Geography of Europe and Russia. Peoples, resources, geographic considerations of the region. (3-0-3)

GEOG 4850. Geography of Africa and the Middle East. An analysis focusing on significant physical features, people, resources, and problems. (3-0-3)

GEOLOGY

GEOL 1121. Introductory Geosciences I. To provide students with an introduction to our dynamic planet which includes processes that create Earth materials in the form of minerals and rocks and those geologic events which shape the Earth’s surface. (3-2-4)

GEOL 1122. Introductory Geosciences II. To introduce students to the evidence for a long and dynamic Earth history, the methods of logical interpretation of that evidence, and a brief summary of important events in the Earth’s history. Prerequisite: GEOL 1121. (3-2-4)

GEOL 1211. The Earth’s Evolving Environment. An introduction to the history of the Earth’s natural environment. Particular attention is focused on methods of inferring past atmospheric, oceanographic, and geographic changes and their effects on biological diversity. (3-0-3)

GEOL 1221. Solar System Exploration. A survey course designed to expose students to the nature and wonders of our solar system. The course will also cover the methods of space exploration which includes the Apollo lunar missions to the current on-going efforts such as the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Surveyor missions. The possibility of extraterrestrial life in the solar system and beyond will also be covered. (3-0-3)

GEOL 3111.  Environmental Geology. A study of human interaction with the environment. Topics include natural hazards, land use, waste management, and geologic aspects of environmental health. Prerequisite: GEOL 1121. (3-2-4)

GEOL 3121. Mineralogy. A study of naturally occurring crystalline substances. Laboratory work focuses on the physical, chemical and crystallographic characteristics of important rock-forming and economic minerals. Lectures emphasize the generation and geologic occurrences of these minerals. Prerequisite: GEOL 1121. (3-2-4)

GEOL 3131. Optical Mineralogy. An introductory section on physical optics will provide a basis for understanding the interaction of light and minerals. The petrographic microscope will then be used to distinguish the common rock-forming minerals, obtain compositional information, and decipher geologic histories. Prerequisite: GEOL 3121. (3-2-4)

GEOL 3211. Invertebrate Paleobiology. Paleontology has traditionally served the Earth sciences primarily as a tool for determining the ages of rocks and inferring how they correlate from place to place. More recently it has become apparent that paleontology provides a unique historical viewpoint on the evolution of the natural environment. This course introduces students to the basic evidence of the Earth’s past life available to paleontologists, assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of that evidence, and the logical application of that evidence to both traditional problems of correlation and to modern discussion of the evolutionary history of the Earth’s environment. Prerequisite: GEOL 1122 and permission of instructor. (3-2-4)

GEOL 3311. Oceanography. The physical, chemical, geological, and biological characteristics of the ocean and the interactions between the hydrosphere, lithosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. Prerequisite: GEOL 1121 (3-2-4)

GEOL 3411. Introduction to Geomorphology. An examination of the basic tectonic and erosional processes that influence the appearance of the Earth’s surface, and the landforms that result from them. Emphasis will be on characterizing landforms descriptively and numerically, and inferring the processes responsible for their formation. Prerequisite: GEOL 1121. (3-2-4)

GEOL 3511. Structural Geology. An introduction to the techniques and terminology used in the recognition and description of rock structures. An introductory section on rock mechanics will provide a basis for distinguishing and evaluating the rock properties and stress responsible for the contrasting styles of deformation. Prerequisite: GEOL 1122. (3-2-4)

GEOL 3611. Economic Mineral Resources. A survey of economic mineral deposits, designed to provide both the student preparing for a career in geology and one interested in minerals with fundamental information regarding the principles and processes of mineral formation. Prerequisite: GEOL 3121. (3-2-4)

GEOL 3621, 3622, 3623. Instrumental Analysis in the Geosciences. This course will provide students with the opportunity to learn operational procedures for specific research instrumentation housed within the Department (e.g., x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscope, etc.). In addition, the students will learn the theory behind the instrumentation, the various applications of this analytical tool, and how to interpret the resulting analytical data. 1 hour credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or Department Chair. (1-0-1)

GEOL 4211. Hydrogeology. This course will provide a basic understanding of the intricate environmental relationships between man, groundwater quality, and groundwater management; and the consequences of ignoring/neglecting those interactions. The general objective will be accomplished through classic textbook teaching, onsite field training, hands-on computer work, and professional guest lectures. Prerequisite: GEOL 1121, GEOL 1122, GEOL 4311, MATH 1113, CHEM 1211, PHYS 1111 suggested, or permission of instructor. (3-2-4)

GEOL 4212. Aqueous Environmental Geochemistry. The quality of both surface water and groundwater systems will be examined in the context of natural geologic settings and anthropogenic activities. Chemical composition, constituent behavior, and factors controlling the rates and nature of chemical reactions that take place as water moves through various components of hydrologic cycle will be studied in forms of lecture, hands-on experiments both in the laboratory and in the field, and problem-solving exercises. (3-2-4)

GEOL 4311. Sedimentation and Sedimentary Petrology. Sedimentation deals with the study of sediment properties, transport mechanisms/dynamics, and the development of sedimentary structures as tools for interpreting paleoenvironments and for predicting rock texture. Sedimentary petrology involves understanding how weathering processes, transport mechanisms, and depositional systems leave interpretable records of themselves in rocks. Petrographic characteristics of the more common sedimentary rocks are examined in this context. Prerequisite: GEOL 3121. (3-2-4)

GEOL 4411. Stratigraphy. Principles of stratigraphy as applied to interpreting the relative and absolute ages of rocks and their local and global correlation. The course will also examine techniques for interpreting specific environments of deposition based on lithology, fossil content, and stratigraphic characteristics, and the application of combined facies and age assessments to understanding the evolution of depositional basins and their strata. Prerequisite: GEOL 4311. (3-2-4)

GEOL 4511. Remote Sensing in the Earth and Planetary Sciences. An introduction to one of the essential tools used by today’s scientific community. The course will cover modern methods of gathering remotely sensed data through aerial photography, satellite electro-optical systems and microwave and acoustical sensors. Applications in geology/planetary science, oceanography, environmental science, archaeology, forestry, and urban planning will be covered. Prerequisite: GEOL 1121, PHYS 1111 or 1112, MATH 1111. (3-2-4)

GEOL 4611. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. This class will introduce the modern techniques and tools of spatial data analysis. Lecture material will focus on the common terminology, software, hardware and techniques utilized in geographic information systems. Applications in scientific research, county and city planning, environmental projects and desktop mapping will be demonstrated and discussed. Lab exercises will involve spatial data collection and conversion, project structuring and presentation, and data interpretation. Prerequisite: None, but a general computer background is required. (3-2-4)

GEOL 4711. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology. A study of the origins, characteristics, and classifications of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Petrographic, geochemical, and structural data will be used to evaluate the origins and tectonic significance of specific rock suites. Prerequisite: GEOL 3131. (3-2-4)

GEOL 4811. Introduction to Geophysics. The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the physics of the Earth and with geophysical methods. Topics include the interior structure and properties of the Earth, seismology, gravimetry, magnetics, heat flow, age of the Earth, and dynamics and structure of the Earth. Topics of college physics are assumed. Calculus-based physics is desirable but not necessary. A course in computer science is desirable. Prerequisite: MATH 1113, PHYS 1112 or 2212, GEOL 3511, or permission of instructor. (3-2-4)

GEOL 4911. Senior Seminar. Will provide senior geology majors with an opportunity to prepare and deliver presentations within various fields of the geosciences. Presentations will be followed by a critical review and discussion from their peers and faculty members. Prerequisite: Senior standing in geology. (1-0-1)

GEOL 4921. Geotectonics. An overview of the major structural and compositional features of the Earth and the modern theories that explain their origin and development. A combination of paleontologic, petrologic, stratigraphic, structural and geophysical data from various global locations will be examined and interpreted. Prerequisite: GEOL 4711, GEOL 3511, GEOL 4411. (3-2-4)

GEOL 4931. Field Methods. An introduction to the current techniques and equipment used in the collection and interpretation of geologic field data. The course will not only examine classical techniques in sampling, surveying, and mapping, but will also provide field and lab experience using GPS (Global Positioning Systems) and GIS (Geographic Information Systems) equipment and software. Several half-day and extended field trips will focus on observational and interpretative skills, while follow-up projects will emphasize technical writing and effective data presentation. Prerequisite: GEOL 4411, GEOL 3511. (3-2-4)

GEOL 4941. Senior Thesis I. The course will provide seniors with the opportunity of collecting scientific data via laboratory and/or field work as part of an original research project. Prior to enrollment in Senior Thesis I, the student will submit a research proposal which will be reviewed and approved by his or her Thesis Director. Prerequisite: Senior status with all required upper-level geology, math, and applied science courses completed. (0-1-1)

GEOL 4942. Senior Thesis II. This portion of Senior Thesis requires the student to employ critical and analytical thinking. Data collected in Senior Thesis I must be compiled and then evaluated for its scientific validity. Subsequently, conclusions must be drawn from this information. The significance of the findings in relation to the common body of knowledge in the geosciences will also be addressed by the student. All data collection methods, results and conclusions will be submitted to the Thesis Director in a specified journal format and will also be presented either at a professional meeting or an in-house seminar. Prerequisite: completion of GEOL 4941. (0-1-1)

HISTORY

Note: History courses numbered 3000 and above are not open to freshmen.

HIST 1111. World Civilization I. A survey of world history to early modern times. (3-0-3)

HIST 1112. World Civilization II. A survey of world history from early modern times to the present. May be taken before HIST 1111. (3-0-3)

HIST 2111. U.S. History I. Discovery of the Western World through the Civil War. A Passing grade in this course satisfies the U. S. history and Georgia history requirements of Georgia State Code 32-171. (3-0-3)

HIST 2112. U.S. History II. Reconstruction Period to the present. May be taken before HIST 2111. A passing grade in this course satisfies the U.S. history and Georgia history requirements of Georgia Code 32-171. (3-0-3)

HIST 2500. The Study of History. An introduction to the study of history. Required of all history majors. (2-0-2)

HIST 3110. Medieval Civilization. Europe from the fifth through the fifteenth century. (3-0-3)

HIST 3510. American Colonial History. Major developments between 1492 and 1789. (3-0-3)

HIST 3530. United States History, 1789-1848. From the beginning of the national period until the end of the Jacksonian era. (3-0-3)

HIST 3570. Civil War and Reconstruction. An in-depth study of the Civil War and Reconstruction period of U.S. History, focusing on the background, political, social, economic, and military aspects of the period. (3-0-3)

HIST 3730. History of the Old South. A study of the Old South during the first half of the 19th century. Topics for study include the economic system of the Old South, slavery, antebellum Southern politics, and social and intellectual patterns of the Old South. (3-0-3)

HIST 3740. Religion and the American South.  An examination of the fundamental relationship between religion and Southern society. (3-0-3)

HIST 3770. Black-American History. The role of African-Americans in the Western Hemisphere, with special emphasis on the struggles of African-Americans for equality and their contributions to American progress. (3-0-3)

HIST 3810. History of Georgia. A survey of the history of Georgia from the beginning to the present. Of particular significance to prospective teachers in elementary and secondary schools. A passing grade in this course satisfies history of Georgia and the Constitution of Georgia requirements of Georgia State Code 32-171. (3-0-3)

HIST 4000. Historiography. A capstone senior seminar course required of all history majors. Survey of leading writers who have produced the major historical works, with special emphasis on the intellectual and cultural influences which helped to shape their historical interpretations. Prerequisite: 15 hours of upper division history or permission of the instructor. (3-0-3)

HIST 4050. Early Modern Europe. Absolutism and Enlightenment, Europe between 1500 and 1715. (3-0-3)

HIST 4060. Europe 1715-1815. (3-0-3)

HIST 4100. Nineteenth Century Europe. Europe between 1814 and 1914. (3-0-3)

HIST 4110. Europe in the Twentieth Century. A history of Europe since 1914. The main political, social, economic, cultural, international, and intellectual movements will be considered. (3-0-3)

HIST 4120. Modern Russia. This course will examine the development of Russia from the reign of Peter I to the present democratic government. Initial lectures will address the geographic setting and the medieval background of Russian history. Among the major topics covered will be the reforms of Peter I, the institution of serfdom and the efforts to retain and reform it, Russia’s cycle of war, revolution and civil war at the beginning of the Twentieth Century, the Soviet State, the Second World War, the Cold War, the collapse of communism. The lecture will examine the political, cultural, and economic aspects of these topics. (3-0-3)

HIST 4130. Eastern Europe. This course will examine the major events in the history of Eastern Europe. Among the major topics covered will be the Byzantine Empire, the Ottoman Empire, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Hapsburg Empire, national revivals, the World Wars, Communist domination and the collapse of Communism. The lectures will examine the political, cultural and economic aspects of these topics.

HIST 4210. The History and Government of Latin America. Factors, forces, and personalities which have shaped the destiny of Latin America from Pre-Columbian times to present. (3-0-3)

HIST 4220. Problems of Latin American History in the 20th Century. The outstanding problems, in historical perspective, of twentieth-century Latin America. (3-0-3)

HIST 4290. United States-Latin American Relations. Various phases and aspects of United States-Latin American relations, especially since 1900. (3-0-3)

HIST 4300. History of Mexico. The outstanding political, economic, social, and cultural developments in Mexico since 1810. (3-0-3)

HIST 4540. United States History, 1877-1920. Populist and Progressive Eras, 1877-1920. (3-0-3)

HIST 4550. Twentieth Century U. S. World War I to the present. (3-0-3)

HIST 4561.  U.S. Social History.  A study of selected and representative social, cultural, and intellectual themes in American history.  (3-0-3)

HIST 4600. History of England to 1603. (3-0-3)

HIST 4610. History of England Since 1603. (3-0-3)

HIST 4770. African History. A survey of the forces, factors, and personalities which have influenced the history of Africa. (3-0-3)

HIST 4800. Emergence of the Third World. The main political, economic, social, and cultural developments associated with the emergence of the Third World (Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East). (3-0-3)

HIST 4900. Special Topics in History. A course on selected issues, problems, and literature in history. (3-0-3)

HIST 4920. History Internship. History related internships are available for qualified students. See the Coordinator of Intern Programs for information. Concurrent enrollment in INTN4920 is required. (0-7-3)

HIST 4930. History Internship. History related internships are available for qualified students. See the Coordinator of Intern Programs for information. Concurrent enrollment in INTN 4920 is required. (0-7-3)

HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

HPER 2010. Lifeguarding. A course designed to provide students with the necessary skills and knowledge to keep patrons of aquatic facilities safe in and around water. (1-2-2)

HPER 2020. Substance Abuse and the Athlete. A course designed to acquaint the student/athlete with substance abuse in today’s society with emphasis on special problems in the athletic community. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (2-0-2)

HPER 2040. Sports Appreciation. Designed for students who are unable to participate in sports activities, with special emphasis being placed on aiding the student in becoming more knowledgeable and appreciative as a spectator or participant. (2-0-2)

HPER 2060. Fundamentals of Baseball. Fundamentals and techniques involved in coaching baseball. (2-0-2)

HPER 2070. Fundamentals of Basketball. Fundamentals and techniques involved in coaching basketball. (2-0-2)

HPER 2080. Fundamentals of Track and Field. Fundamentals and techniques involved in coaching track and field. (2-0-2)

HPER 2090. Athletic Training and Conditioning. Theory and practice of massage, bandaging, taping, and caring for athletic injuries. Provides basic information on injury prevention and immediate care of the more common sports injuries for those entering into the fields of coaching and/or physical education. Basic foundations are also provided for the student interested in more substantive areas of rehabilitation and allied health careers. (3-1-3)

HPER 2100. First Aid and Safety. American Red Cross standard courses in first aid and CPR (Certification). (1-2-2)

HPER 2140. Water Safety Instructor. A course designed to train instructor candidates how to teach a number of water safety and swimming courses. The course reflects a continuing commitment to improve the quality of water safety and swimming instruction. (1-2-2)

HPER 2170. Introduction to Physical Education. Introduction to the fields of Health and Physical Education as pertains to program demands and employment opportunities. Trends in the past and current physical education movement emphasized. Field experience required. (1-0-1)

HPER 2180. Introduction to Recreation. Introduction to the field of Recreation. Emphasis is placed on abilities and personal characteristics, professional qualifications, and employment situation. Field experience required. (2-2-3)

HPER 2200. Maintenance of Recreation Facilities. A course designed to acquaint recreation majors with the basic maintenance problems, procedures, and situations of recreation agencies. (2-1-2)

HPER 2240. Nutrition and Human Performance. A study of basic nutritional concepts as they relate to the exercising individual. Emphasis will be on the physiological response of proper nutrition and methods of enhancing exercise or athletic performance. (3-0-3)

HPER 2350. Camping and Outdoor Recreation. A course designed to train camp leaders and counselors. Includes: organized camping, camp counselor skills, camp activities, and camping and trail skills. Field experience required. (3-1-3)

HPER 2410. Social Recreation. Practical application of planning, demonstrating, and conducting activities and programs for various social events and gatherings.  (2-0-2)

HPER 2500.  Computer Applications in HHP.   This course is designed as a comprehensive overview of computer-based methods for accessing, analyzing, and communicating information in the area of health and human performance.  The course will focus on the development of skills necessary for effective utilization of various computer tools and applications used in health, physical education, recreation and exercise science.  (3-0-3)

HPER 3000. Recreation Practicum. A practical field work experience under supervision in an approved recreational and leisure setting. (0-8-4)

HPER 3010. Materials and Methods for Health Education. A course concerned with the understanding of the pedagogical basis and the content area for the total school health education program. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

HPER 3050. Materials and Methods of Teaching Early Childhood Physical Education. A study of principles and procedures in conducting a program of health and physical education in the early childhood grades. Emphasis will be placed on methods of effective teaching, classroom management, growth and development of motor skills, and liability issues in the classroom and the gymnasium environment. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

HPER 3060. Materials and Methods of Teaching Middle Grades Physical Education. A study of principles and procedures in conducting a program of health and physical education in the middle grades. Emphasis will be placed on methods of effective teaching, classroom management, growth and development of motor skills, and liability issues in the classroom and the gymnasium environment. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

HPER 3090. Advanced Athletic Training. A concentrated study by means of participation, observation, discussion, and research pertaining to advanced topics in the evaluation of traumatic and non-traumatic athletic injuries, as well as injuries to children and older adults. Prerequisite: HPER 2090. (3-2-3)

HPER 3100. Community Health. Present day philosophy of the health care system including current needs and priorities in delivery of health services, intelligent consumer health selection, specific community health problems and solutions, and safety education. (3-0-3)

HPER 3240. Kinesiology. Study of the human movement, along with the various muscles, bones, and nerves utilized within those movements. Prerequisite: BIOL 2030 and BIOL 2040. (3-1-3)

HPER 3250. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education. Methods in evaluating and testing in physical education and procedures to be used in evaluating these tests and their results, including statistical analysis. (3-1-3)

HPER 3260. Exercise Physiology. The current practice and theory of exercise physiology as applied to work, physical education, and sports. Prerequisite: BIOL 2030 and BIOL 2040. Lab fee required. (3-1-3)

HPER 3280. Exercise Testing and Prescription. A course designed to provide exercise science/wellness students with theoretical and practical knowledge of the various techniques used in clinical exercise testing and prescription for various populations. Prerequisites: HPER 3240, HPER 3250, and HPER 3260. Lab fee required. (3-1-3)

HPER 3300. Principles of Strength and Conditioning. A course designed to provide students with theoretical and practical knowledge of the physiological, biomechanical, and administrative aspects of designing and supervising strength and conditioning programs for various populations. Prerequisite: HPER 3240 and HPER 3260. (3-1-3)

HPER 3310. Exercise Leadership. A course designed to teach leadership skills, motivational techniques, choreography, administrative functions dealing with equipment purchase, organization, use, and experiences leading aerobic exercise formats for a variety of populations. (3-0-3)

HPER 3320. Health Promotion. A study of the principles and procedures necessary to effectively conduct health promotion program. The emphasis will be placed on the role of the health professional in developing wellness and preventive-oriented interventions to promote healthy lifestyles. (3-0-3)

HPER 3330. Exercise Science/Wellness Practicum. (0-8-4)

HPER 3350. Organization and Administration of Recreation. Deals with administrative problems common to playground and community center directors and others having executive responsibilities in the field of recreation. (3-0-3)

HPER 3410. Recreation Leadership. A course that deals with the philosophical and practical aspects of program construction, leadership skills, and methods. (2-0-2)

HPER 3500. Recreation Planning. Provides an understanding of the principles and objectives of planning recreation programs, facilities, space, and the interdependent relationship of activities to physical environment. (3-0-3)

HPER 3550.  Selected Problems in Special Populations.  Selected problems confronting individuals with special needs in the areas of physical development, therapeutic activities, and physiological performance.  (3-0-3)

HPER 3600.  Techniques of Teaching Sport Skills.  Skills, appreciation, knowledge, and effective teaching techniques for individual, dual and team sports. (3-0-3)

HPER 3700. Contemporary Issues in Health.  Scientific study of heal education with emphasis placed on the application of health facts and principles that are related to a better life physically, mentally and socially for the student today.  (3-0-3)

HPER 3800.  Family Health Issues.  The study of various health issues as they relate to relationships and family life.  Topics include sexuality and sexual behavior, family planning, pregnancy and childbirth, parenting, communication and interpersonal relationships, and violence and abuse.  (3-0-3)

HPER 4010. Theory and Coaching Football. Emphasis on the fundamentals of position play and methods of coaching offensive and defensive team play, the running, passing and kicking game presented. Complete organization of a football program. (2-1-2)

HPER 4020. Theory and Coaching Basketball. Practical experience in fundamental skills and techniques, team play and strategy. Specific offense and defense analyzed. A definite plan of offense and defense presented. (2-1-2)

HPER 4040. Theory and Coaching Track and Field. Emphasis on psychology of coaching, analysis of the form and techniques of the various events. (2-1-2)

HPER 4050. Recreation Internship. (0-11-4)

HPER 4060. Recreation Internship. (0-11-4)

HPER 4070. Recreation Internship. (0-11-4)

HPER 4100. Exercise Science/Wellness Internship. (0-11-4)

HPER 4110. Exercise Science/Wellness Internship. (0-11-4)

HPER 4120. Exercise Science/Wellness Internship. (0-11-4)

HUMANITIES

HUMN 2000. Humanities I. A variable credit (1 to 3 semester hours) course on selected topics in the humanities studied through a study aborad program with an accredited college-level institution. Prerequisite: Permission of the respective study abroad program and approval of a GSW Transient Permission form. (1-0-1, 2-0-2, or 3-0-3)

HUMN 3000. Humanities II. A variable credit (1 to 3 semester hours) course on selected topics in the humanities studied through a study aborad program with an accredited college-level institution. Prerequisite: Permission of the respective study abroad program and approval of a GSW Transient Permission form. (1-0-1, 2-0-2, or 3-0-3)

INTERNSHIPS

INTN 4920A. Internship Seminar. (0-7-3)

INTN 4920B. Georgia Internship Seminar. (0-7-3)

INTN 4920C. Legislative Internship Seminar. (0-7-3)

INTN 4920D. Governor’s Internship Seminar. (0-7-3)

INTN 4920E. Congressional Internship Seminar. (0-7-3)

JAPANESE

JAPN 1001. Elementary Japanese I. A course for students beginning the study of Japanese. Basic grammatical structures and their functions will be taught with special emphasis on speaking and listening skills. This course does not satisfy the foreign language requirements for degree programs. Not open to native speakers. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

JAPN 1002. Elementary Japanese II. A continuation of Japanese 1001, this course emphasizes further understanding of basic structures while stressing speaking and listening skills. The course also introduces reading and writing skills for katakana and hiragana. Prerequisite: Japanese 1001 or approval of instructor. Not open to native speakers. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

JAPN 2001. Intermediate Japanese I. A continuation of Japanese 1002, this course stresses idiomatic speaking and listening skills in different styles and in long discourses. Reading skills of written Japanese will also be developed. This course introduces kanji. Prerequisites: Japanese 1002 or approval of instructor. Not open to native speakers. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

JAPN2002. Intermediate Japanese II. A continuation of Japanese 2001, this course stresses idiomatic speaking and listening skills in different styles and in long discourses, with an emphasis on the functions of Japanese structures. Reading and writing Japanese will also be taught. Prerequisites: Japanese 2001 or approval of instructor. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

LEAD 1000. Leadership Development. This course is designed for the student who is interested in increasing his or her understanding of the theories and techniques related to leadership development. The opportunity is provided for students to assess their leadership potential; to develop leadership skills for application in campus, professional, and personal settings; and to demonstrate these skills through communication and leadership experiences. Four areas of emphasis will be personal growth, human relations skills, leadership theories and skills, and group dynamics. Special sections are offered occasionally for groups of students with similar leadership interest, such as O’Team members, Resident Assistants, and members of other student organizations. (1-0-1)

LIBRARY

LIBR 1000. Intro to Library & On-line Resources.  An introduction to identifying information needs and using appropriate resources.  This course will provide descriptions and hands-on use of print and electronic information sources.  It is designed for all students to prepare them for identifying and managing information and conducting research of all their courses. (1-0-1)

LINGUISTICS

LING 4100. Linguistics and Methods. The application of linguistics in classroom and laboratory settings. Lectures, linguistic analyses, demonstrations, materials evaluations and computer and language laboratory assignments. Required of all majors in French and Spanish. Must be completed before student teaching. Prerequisite: completion of intermediate language courses or the equivalent. EDSC 4111, when taught by foreign language faculty, may substitute. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

LING 4150. Introduction to Linguistics. An introduction to the field of linguistics, with discussion given to its historical development, its major branches, and the major theoretical issues in the field. (3-0-3)

LEARNING SUPPORT TUTORING

LSPT 2000. Learning Support Peer Tutor Training. An introduction to contemporary learning theory and its application to one-to-one (tutorial) and small group learning situations. Emphasis will be placed on philosophy, procedures, and practice which are known to be effective on improving learning. Prerequisite: Recommendation of Department Chair, 3.00 GPA in course tutored, and permission from the instructor. (1-0-1)

LSPT 2001–2004. Learning Support Peer Tutor Practicum. Supervised supplemental instruction of students in one-to-one and small group settings. Conditions of the tutorial experience are outlined in the contract with the instructor. (May be repeated for a maximum of four (4) credits.) Prerequisite: Learning Support Peer Tutor Training. (0-1-1)

LEARNING SUPPORT MATH

MATH 0098, 0099.  Elementary Algebra.  A two-semester sequence of courses required of Learning Support students to prepare them for MATH 1111.  Enrollment is by placement testing or by volunteering for at least one semester or two semesters, depending on the performance of students on the exit test.  Course content includes basic algebra skills.  MATH 0099 may be repeated with an S (satisfactory) grade.  One hour of laboratory work is required.  (4-1-4)

MATHEMATICS

MATH 1111. College Algebra. This course is a functional approach to algebra that incorporates the use of appropriate technology. Emphasis will be placed on the study of functions, and their graphs, inequalities, and linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Appropriate applications will be included. Prerequisite: 2 years of high school algebra. Offered every semester. (3-0-3)

MATH 1112.  Plane Trigonometry.  Trigonometric functions, derivation of standard formulae, identities, inverse functions and equations, use of logarithmic and exponential functions, and solution of triangles.  Prerequisite:  MATH 1111.  Offered each semester.  (3-0-3)

MATH 1113. Precalculus. This course is designed to prepare students for calculus, physics, and related technical subjects. Topics include an intensive study of algebraic and transcendental functions accompanied by analytic geometry. Prerequisite: 3 years of high school mathematics including two years of algebra. Offered every semester. (3-0-3)

MATH 1120. Calculus I. A study of the fundamental concepts of the calculus: limits and continuity, differentiation, the mean value theorem, applications of differentiations, Riemann integration, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and elementary applications of integration. Prerequisite: MATH 1113. Offered every semester. (4-0-4)

MATH 2204. Elementary Statistics. The study of the nature of statistics, the fundamental concepts of probability, the methods of collecting and analyzing data, and the techniques of making inferences based upon data. Technology, in the form of graphing calculators and statistical software, will be integrated in the course. Prerequisite: MATH 1111 or MATH 1113. Offered every semester. (3-0-3)

MATH 2221. Calculus II. This is a continuation of Calculus I. It deals with further applications of one variable integration, the techniques of integration, sequences, series, indeterminant forms and improper integrals. Technology, in the form of graphing calculators and modeling software, will be integrated in the course. Prerequisite: MATH 1120. Offered every semester. (4-0-4)

MATH 2222. Calculus III. This is a continuation of Calculus II. It introduces students to the notions of vector calculus commonly used in engineering and science applications: vector and scalar functions of several variables, gradients, curl and divergence, mini-max theorems, multiple integrals, line integrals, the theorems of Green, Gauss and Stokes, and their applications. Technology, in the form of graphing calculators and modeling software, will be integrated in the course. Prerequisite: MATH 2221. Offered every semester. (4-0-4)

MATH 2223. Discrete Systems I (Linear Algebra). A course designed to give students an early experience of the power and applicability of discrete models in the solution of problems in mathematics, the sciences, computer science and engineering. Discrete Systems I focuses on linear algebra and its applications. Corequisite: MATH 2221 or MATH 2222. Offered every Fall Semester. (3-0-3)

MATH 2224. Discrete Systems II. Topics include number theory, graphs and algorithms, analysis of algorithms, Boolean logic, discrete stochastic models, and an applications-oriented introduction to modern algebra. Corequisite: MATH 2221 or MATH 2222. Offered every Spring Semester. (3-0-3)

MATH 3001.  Number Theory for Teachers.  Introduces students to concepts of number theory appropriate for middle grades and early childhood classrooms, including divisibility, number bases, primality, congruence, along with applications to discrete probability, cryptography, mental arithmetic, geometry, art, and music.  Offered in alternate fall semesters.  Prerequisite:  MATH 1111 or MATH 1113, and junior standing.  (3-0-3)

MATH 3002. Geometry for Teachers. Euclidean and other geometric models for pre-service teachers. Field work required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Offered every Spring Semester. (3-0-3)

MATH 3100. Modern Geometry. This course includes the study of topics in classical Euclidean Geometry, non-Euclidean Geometry (Spherical and Hyperbolic), Projective, Algebraic and Differential Geometry, and Finite Geometry. The course also explores current research topics such as sphere packing and Fermat curves, and promotes the use of technology as a tool for geometric discovery. Prerequisites: MATH 2222 and MATH 2223. Offered every spring semester. (3-0-3)

MATH 3200. Number Theory. This course includes the study of divisibility, congruence, quadratic reciprocity, dophantine equations, continued fractions, multiplicative functions, algebraic and transcendental numbers, and promotes the use of technology to explore advanced topics of current interest. Prerequisites: MATH 2222 and MATH 2224. Offered every fall semester. (3-0-3)

MATH 3313. Differential Equations. This course provides students of mathematics, science and pre-engineering with a qualitative, numeric and analytic approach to the dynamical systems commonly encountered in their disciplines. Prerequisites: MATH 2222 and MATH 2223. Offered in fall of alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 3316. Analysis I. This course introduces students to the basic elements of mathematical analysis. Topics include the topology of Euclidean space, sequences and limits, continuity and differentiation. Prerequisites: MATH 2222 and MATH 2223. Offered fall of alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 3317. Analysis II. A continuation of Analysis I. Topics include the integrals of Riemann-Stieltjes and Lebesque, infinite series and products, sequences of functions, Fourier series and integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 3316. Offered in spring of alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 3320. Scientific Computation. An introduction to the elements of modern scientific computing, using visualization, vector-level thinking skills, numeric models, and analytic techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 2222, MATH 2223, and Introduction to Structured Programming. Offered each Spring Semester. (3-0-3)

MATH 3322. Advanced Mathematical Modeling. Teaches the art of mathematical modeling and the techniques of validation in deterministic and stochastic settings. Prerequisites: MATH 2222 and MATH 2204 or MATH 3325. Offered in alternate Fall Semesters. (3-0-3)

MATH 3325. Mathematical Statistics. A course designed to give students of mathematics, computer science, the physical sciences, and pre-engineering a reasoned introduction to probability and statistics using the multivariable calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 2222. Offered every Spring Semester. (3-0-3)

MATH 4412. Modern Algebra I. This course gives students an understanding of standard algebra structures: groups, rings, ideals and fields, and their relationship to models from number theory and geometry. Prerequisites: MATH 2222 and MATH 2224. Offered every Fall Semester. (3-0-3)

MATH 4413. Modern Algebra II. This is a continuation of Modern Algebra I. Topics include classification theorems for finite groups, field extensions, Galois theory and applications, algebraic coding theory. Prerequisite: MATH 4412. Offered every Spring Semester. (3-0-3)

MATH 4440. Partial Differential Equations. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the elements of partial differential equations and related aspects of applied mathematics in a modeling context. Topics include boundary value problems, Fourier and generalized Fourier series, Fourier integrals, Laplace and Fourier transforms, the heat, wave, and potential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 3313. Offered Fall Semester of alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 4442. Complex Analysis. An introduction to basic ideas concerning functions of one complex variable. Topics include analytic functions, Cauchy’s integral theorem, series and products, calculus of residues, conformal mapping, asymptotic methods, and applications to heat conduction, electrostatics, aerodynamics and hydrodynamics. Prerequisite: MATH 3313. Offered Spring Semester of alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 4450. Topology I. A study of general topological spaces, continuity, compactness, connectedness, separability, and characterization of metrizability. Prerequisite: MATH 3316. Offered Fall Semester in alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 4451. Topology II. A continuation of Topology I, emphasizing the elements of geometric and algebraic topology. Topics include identification spaces, fundamental group, triangulations, surface theory, knot theory. Prerequisite: MATH 4450 and MATH 4412. Offered Spring Semester in alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 4454. Industrial Mathematics I. This course introduces students to a variety of mathematical techniques used to make organizational, scheduling, and optimization decisions in research and industrial settings. Prerequisites: MATH 3313 and MATH 3325. Offered Fall Semester of alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 4455. Industrial Mathematics II. A course that provides students with modeling and problem solving experiences that parallel applications of mathematics in industrial, and research and development settings. Prerequisites: MATH 4454, MATH 4440. Offered Spring Semester of alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 4456.  Introduction to Financial Engineering.  This is an introduction to the mathematical models used in financial engineering, with particular emphasis on models for pricing and hedging derivative securities such as options and futures, and on models for portfolio optimization.  The course examines the models of Black-Scholes, Markowitz and their recent modifications, with a variety of applications.  Prerequisite:  MATH 3325 or a strong, basic knowledge of probability.  Offered in Spring semester of alternative years.  (3-0-3)

MATH 4490. History and Philosophy of Mathematics. Topics in the history of mathematics for pre-service teachers.  A capstone course emphasizing key ideas in algebra, geometry, probability and statistics, and number theory, in a historical and philosophical context.  Prerequisites:  Permission of instructor.  Offered every May term. (3-0-3)

MATH 4499. Senior Honors Thesis in Mathematics. An opportunity for qualified and highly motivated students in mathematics to do mentored research under the guidance of a member of the mathematics faculty. Prerequisite: Senior standing, an average of B or better in mathematics courses, the consent of a faculty mentor, and the approval of the Chair of Mathematics. Offered as appropriate. (3-0-3)

MANAGEMENT

MGNT 3390. Human Resources Law. The current status of legal statutes and issues in human resource management is analyzed. Emerging issues and trends are explored. Prerequisite: MGNT 3600. (3-0-3)

MGNT 3600. Principles of Management. Management principles applicable to all types of cooperative enterprises. The vital functions of the manager are studied in detail. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. (3-0-3)

MGNT 3610. Production and Operations Management. The application of management science principles to the actual management of an industrial plant. Through the application of these techniques, improved decisions are made as to hiring, firing, training, output planning and controlling, raw material acquisition, quality control budgeting, and maintenance expenditures as concerns the manufacturer of products. Prerequisite: BUSA 3050 or equivalent. (3-0-3)

MGNT 3615. Advanced Production and Operations Management. A continuation of the application of management science principles to the management involved in factories and plants. These techniques aid decision makers in areas involving training, job shop controls, transformation processes, material management and acquisition, total quality control and assurance, and budget controls that concern product manufacturing. Contemporary topics and current issues are a part of the course. Prerequisite: MGNT 3610. (3-0-3)

MGNT 3650. Introduction to International Business. An introduction to the nature and environment of international business, multinational business operations, and the future of international business. Prerequisite: None. (3-0-3)

MGNT 3670. Introduction To Human Resource Management. This course is intended as an overview of the field of human resource management for the non-major. Emphasis will be placed on management responsibilities regarding the organization’s human resources. Prerequisite: Junior status. (3-0-3)

MGNT 3680. Organizational Theory and Behavior. The theory and application of behavioral interaction within organizations. Extensive use is made of practice exercises that require organizational effort in the classroom. Prerequisite: MGNT 3600. (3-0-3)

MGNT 4190. Strategic Management. A study of business strategy and strategic planning in relation to company resources, the environment, and changes which may bring opportunities or threats. An opportunity to apply one’s skills through strategic case analysis and through the management of a manufacturing firm in a computer-simulated business situation. Prerequisite: MGNT 3600, MKTG 3800, and BUSA 3150. (3-0-3)

MGNT 4260. Small Business Management. An introduction to the world of small business including the principles of successful small business management. The course covers the entire range of decision areas encountered by the small business manager, including starting considerations, government regulations and assistance, and effective control systems. Experimental exercises are used, and the student is encouraged to use the opportunity to integrate material covered in a number of other courses. Prerequisite: MGNT 3600. (3-0-3)

MGNT 4640. Purchasing Management. An analysis of the problems and functions of the purchasing agent as they relate both to industrial and consumer goods. Prerequisite: MGNT 3600, MKTG 3800. (3-0-3)

MGNT 4660. Business Forecasting. An introduction to the analysis of business fluctuations as a major factor in forecasting business activity on a general level as well as for the individual firm. The importance of forecasting is included along with consideration of macro-economic forces which affect forecasts and various methods of analysis for determination of cyclical factors and other methods of preparing and documenting forecasts. Prerequisite: BUSA 3050 or equivalent. (3-0-3)

MGNT 4670. Advanced Human Resource Management I. An overview of the personnel management function in organizations. It serves as an introductory course for the prospective personnel officer and as a survey of personnel responsibilities and activities for any manager with supervisory responsibilities. Prerequisite: MGNT 3600. (3-0-3)

MGNT 4680. Advanced Human Resource Management II. Continuation of MGNT 4670 with emphasis on job design and analysis, performance appraisal, and compensation systems. Prerequisite: MGNT 4670. (3-0-3)

MGNT 4690. Labor Management Relations. An analysis of the industrial relations problems between organized labor and management, and the interrelationships of the union, its members, and the nonunion workers. Prerequisite: MGNT 3600. 
(3-0-3)

MGNT 4790.  Current Issues in Human Resources.  This course is designed for senior Human Resources students.  It acts as a capstone course, and is conducted as a seminar.  Current issues in the field of Human Resources will serve as the springboard for discussion and research.  Students will have the opportunity to engage others in their field, and the instructor, in a collegial atmosphere designed to stimulate an appreciation and thorough understanding of the issues in the field.  Prerequisite:  MGNT 4670.  (3-0-3)

MARKETING

MKTG 3800. Principles of Marketing. Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods and services from producer to consumer. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (3-0-3)

MKTG 3850. Real Estate Principles. An introduction to the principles of real estate analysis and utilization. Subjects include the nature of real property, the legal instruments involved in real property transactions, market analysis and the determinants of real estate values, the appraisal process, investment and financial analysis, and public policy aspects of real estate planning and utilization. Prerequisite: MKTG 3800. (3-0-3)

MKTG 3870. Principles of Transportation. A study of the economic and service aspects of various means of transportation and related principal physical distribution. Prerequisite: MKTG 3800. (3-0-3)

MKTG 4800.  Personal Selling.  This course is designed to provide the basic concepts and theories involved with developing and maintaining personal exchange relationships.   Students participate in experiential exercises and selling role-playing to develop an understanding and appreciation of the skills required in being a successful salesperson.  Prerequisite:  MKTG 3800.  (3-0-3)

MKTG 4805.  Sales Management.  This course is designed to provide students the basic concepts about managing a sales force and how to apply them to solve business problems.  In addition, the course will introduce students to the sequence of activities that guide sales managers in the creation and administration of a successful sales program.  Prerequisite:  MKTG 3800.  (3-0-3)

MKTG 4820. Consumer Behavior. This course is a natural blending of psychology, social psychology, cultural anthropology, sociology, and marketing. Based on empirical research on what the consumer does and why, the course focuses on practical guidelines for the marketing manager. Decision-making models are analyzed, and implications for influencing decisions are highlighted. Although heavily laden with the conceptual frameworks of behavioral science, Consumer Behavior is taught as a marketing course. Prerequisite: MKTG 3800. (3-0-3)

MKTG 4830. Marketing Communications. An overview of methods, procedures, strategies, and applications in communicating with consumer and business markets as an integral part of the promotion function with respect to mass communications (advertising and public relations), personal selling, direct marketing, and sales promotion. The various media which may be employed in these forms of the promotion function and the effects upon resulting buyer behavior will be evaluated and considered in their specific applications. Prerequisite: MKTG 3800. (3-0-3)

MKTG 4850. Marketing Channels. An overview of methods, procedures, strategies, and applications in the management of channels of distribution of products and services from producer to final consumer sale. This includes retailing for consumer goods, personnel selling and sales management for business goods, as well as transportation and logistic services. Consumer behavior for household purchasing in the retail market and business buying behavior in the business market are also included. Prerequisite: MKTG 3800. (3-0-3)

MKTG 4870. Sports Marketing. A course which examines the unique nature of marketing sport both as a participatory and spectator event. Emphasis is upon understanding the synergy of marketing, sport, and society. Consideration is given to marketing collegiate and professional sports. Prerequisite: MKTG 3800. (3-0-3)

MKTG 4880. Entertainment Marketing. An introduction to fundamental concepts of marketing activities in the diverse entertainment field. Prerequisite: MKTG 3800. (3-0-3)

MKTG 4890. Marketing Management. An extension of the descriptive aspects of marketing principles into the arena of application. Emphasis is placed on the marketing planning process, environmental analysis, strategic marketing, and the effective implementation of marketing plans. Prerequisite: MKTG 3800 and MGNT 3600. (3-0-3)

MKTG 4910. Marketing Research. A course to provide the student with a working knowledge of the principles and theory of business research applied specifically to the marketing environment. The course stresses both concepts and application. Prerequisite: MKTG 3800, BUSA 2010, and BUSA 3050. (3-0-3)

MUSIC

MUSC 0990. Recital Laboratory. A weekly laboratory designed to provide experiences in hearing live performances of a wide variety of music including student recitals, guest performances, master classes, and other concerts listed by the music faculty. All majors must register for this class for seven semesters. Transfers will be assessed by the music faculty to determine how many semesters of MUSC 0990 they will need to complete their degree requirements. Credit: 0 hours. Offered F, Sp.

MUSC 1100. Music Appreciation. Introduction to music listening and literature. A study of traditional forms of music from ancient times to the present with emphasis on the basic elements of music and their relationships. This study emphasizes the development of listening skills and musical understanding. Offered every semester. (3-0-3)

MUSC 1401. Group Piano I. Practical skills and techniques for expressive piano performance, to include the following: reading, improvisation, harmonization, transposition, and sight reading. This course will also provide a variety of piano pieces in contrasting styles for solo and ensemble performance emphasizing melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structures. Sequence begins every four semesters. (2-0-2)

MUSC 1402. Group Piano II. Practical skills and techniques for expressive piano performance, maintaining and refining the techniques of reading, improvisation, harmonization, transposition, sight reading. This course will also build a repertory of solo piano pieces; analyze rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic structures; and perform solo pieces as well as accompaniments to instrumental and vocal solos. Sequence begins every four semesters. (2-0-2)

MUSC 1201. Elementary Harmony I. A study of the fundamentals of music including intervals, triads, keys, scales, modes, meter, part-writing, figured bass, harmonic analysis, and an intro to modulation. Prerequisite: Theory Placement Test. Offered every four semesters. (3-0-3)

MUSC 1202. Elementary Harmony II. Continuation of study covered in MUSC 1201 expanding to non-harmonic tones, 7th chords, secondary dominants, augmented 6th chords and Neapolitan 6th chords with harmonic analysis to early 19th century. Prerequisite: MUSC 1201. Offered every four semesters. (3-0-3)

MUSC 1211. Sight Singing I. A course designed to develop sight reading skills involving ear-training, keyboard performance skills, and sight singing. To be taken concurrently with MUSC 1201. Offered every four semesters. (1-0-1)

MUSC 1212. Sight Singing II. Continuation of study covered in MUSC 1211 concentrating on improving skills of ear-training, keyboard performance, and sight singing. Prerequisite: MUSC 1211. To be taken concurrently with MUSC 1202. Offered every four semesters. (1-0-1)

MUSC 1401.  Group Piano I.  Practical skills and techniques for expressive piano performance, to include the following:  reading, improvisation, harmonization, transposition, and sight reading.  This course will also provide a variety of piano pieces in contrasting styles for solo and ensemble performance emphasizing melodic, rhythmic and harmonic structures.  Sequence begins every four semesters.  (2-0-2). 

MUSC 2010. Southwest Civic Chorus. A mixed, non-auditioned choral organization comprised of students, faculty, and townspeople, performing major choral works with piano/organ or orchestral accompaniment. Offered at least one a year. May be taken more than once. (1-0-1)

MUSC 2030. GSW Chamber Singers. A mixed, auditioned chamber choral organization specializing in Renaissance madrigal repertoire through contemporary jazz, show, and pop music. Offered F, Sp. May be taken more than once. (1-0-1)

MUSC 2080. University Concert Band. An auditioned instrumental organization which provides the student an opportunity to study and perform the best in standard and contemporary band literature. Offered F, Sp. May be taken more than once. (1-0-1)

MUSC 2090. GSW Concert Choir. A mixed, non-auditioned choral organization performing Renaissance through 20th Century repertoire for collegiate level performance standards. Offered F, Sp. May be taken more than once. (1-0-1)

MUSC 2120. Small Ensemble. An auditioned chamber ensemble performance experience in brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments. Offered F, Sp. May be taken more than once. (1-0-1)

MUSC 2130. University Jazz Band. A auditioned jazz band which provides the student an opportunity to study and perform the best in jazz literature. Opportunities for solo-improvisation are provided. Offered F, Sp. May be taken more than once. (1-0-1)

MUSC 2203.  Intermediate Harmony.  Continuation of materials covered in MUSC 1201 and 1202, expanding to mid and later 19th Century harmonic analysis, melody harmonization, introductory composition exercises, and an introduction to arranging, orchestration, and counterpoint.  (3-0-3)

MUSC 2213. Sight Singing III. Continuation of sight reading and sight singing skills taught in MUSC 1211 and 1213 with emphasis on ear-training, keyboard performance skills, and singing. Prerequisite: MUSC 1212. To be taken concurrently with MUSC 2303. Offered every four semesters. (1-0-1)

MUSC 2214. Sight Singing IV. Continuation of sight reading and sight singing skills taught in MUSC 1211, 1213, and 2213 with emphasis on ear-training, keyboard performance skills, and singing. Prerequisite: MUSC 2213. To be taken concurrently with MUSC 3204. Offered every four semesters. (1-0-1)

MUSC 2400. Introduction to Conducting. Introduction and development of skills basic to instrumental and choral conducting. Offered every four semesters. (1-0-1)

MUSC 3040.  GSW Chamber Singers.  MUSC 3040 is an advanced auditioned chamber choral ensemble specializing in Renaissance madrigal repertoire, vocal chamber literature, and 20th century vocal jazz.  Especially geared towards music majors as an introduction to choral literature beyond the level of Concert Choir.  Performs frequently on campus and represents the university off campus and around the state.  (1-0-1)

MUSC 3071. Music in Early Childhood (K-4). Designed to introduce the student to the professional field of music education and acquaint the student with the curriculum structure, materials, and methods of teaching at the early childhood level. Prerequisites: EDUC 2010; MUSC 3204; Admission to Teacher Education Program. Offered every three semesters. (3-0-3)

MUSC 3082. Music in the Middle School (4-8). Designed to acquaint the music education major with the curriculum structure, materials, and methods of teaching music in the middle grades. Prerequisite: MUSC 3071. Offered every three semesters. (3-0-3)

MUSC 3093. Choral Music in the Secondary School. A course involved with materials and methods necessary in conducting a secondary choral music program. Prerequisites: MUSC 3071 and 3082. Offered every three semesters. (2-0-2)

MUSC 3103. Instrumental Music in the Secondary School. Designed to provide future band directors with the foundations and principles for teaching instrumental music in the secondary school. Prerequisites: MUSC 3071 and 3082. Offered every three semesters. (2-0-2)

MUSC 3120.  Small Ensemble.  An advanced autitioned chamber ensemble performance experience in brass, woodwind and percussion instruments.  Especially geared towards music majors as an introduction to instrumental literature above the level of Concert Band.  Performs frequently on and off campus.  (1-0-1)

MUSC 3155.  Music History:  Ancient to Baroque.  A study of music from ancient Greek and early Christian music to the end of the Baroque period.  (3-0-3)

MUSC 3165.  Music History:  Classic to Modern.  A study of music from the Classical period to present day.  (3-0-3)

MUSC 3180. Music History: Multi-cultural/ Non Western European Tradition. Designed to offer an introduction to music other than that developed from the European tertian harmonic (major/minor) tradition including an examination of the music, instruments, and cultures of India, the Middle East, Greece, China, Japan, Indonesia, Africa, Latin America, and the North American Indian and African American. Offered every four semesters. (2-0-2)

MUSC 3200. Brass Techniques. Acquaints students with the performance fundamentals and teaching methods for brass instruments. Offered every four semesters. (1-0-1)

MUSC 3204. Advanced Harmony. Application of principle and techniques acquired in MUSC 1201, 1202, 2303 with examination of late 19th and 20th Century harmonic techniques and a continuation of harmonic and formal analysis and applications of counterpoint. Prerequisite: MUSC 2303. Offered every four semesters. (3-0-3)

MUSC 3210. Woodwind Techniques. Concentrates on the performance fundamentals and teaching methods for woodwind instruments. Offered every four semesters. (1-0-1)

MUSC 3220. String Techniques. Designed to provide techniques for performance and methods of teaching stringed instruments (violin family). Offered every four semesters. (1-0-1)

MUSC 3230. Percussion Techniques. Provides students with the techniques for performance and methods of teaching percussion instruments. Offered every four semesters. (1-0-1)

MUSC 3240. Performance and Teaching Methods of Classroom Instruments. Concentrates on basic performance skills on recorder and guitar. Students will perform selected melodic and harmonic musical examples. Additionally, students will accompany selected compositions using I-IV-V chords in keys of C-F and G. Offered every four semesters. (1-0-1)

MUSC 3250. Voice Techniques. Designed to study voice and basic principles of its use, including vocal techniques for individual and group performance. Basic techniques of vocal pedagogy are emphasized. Offered every four semesters. (2-0-2)

MUSC 3300. Choral Conducting. Provides students with basic skills in choral conducting including hand and baton techniques, score study, rehearsal techniques and performance practices. Prerequisite: MUSC 2400. Offered every four semesters. (1-0-1)

MUSC 3310. Instrumental Conducting. Develops basic skills in instrumental conducting, including hand and baton techniques, score study, rehearsal techniques and performance practices. Prerequisite: MUSC 2400. Offered every four semesters. (1-0-1)

MUSC 3400.  Junior Recital.  Taken concurrently with MUSC 352 or MUSC 372 Applied Music.  Student will work with Applied Music Instructor and Accompanist in preparation for 20-30 minute recital program.  (1-0-1)

MUSC 4800.  Senior Recital.  Taken concurrently with MUSC 452 or MUSC 472 Applied Music.  Student will work with Applied Music Instructor and Accompanist in preparation for 40-50 minute recital program.  (1-0-1)

Applied music is offered each semester and applied music fees are assessed for each student at the rate of $120.00 per 1 hour academic credit. Students must have instructor’s permission before registering for applied music courses.

Applied Music (Offered Each Semester)

MUSC 151, 152.*Applied Music. Major area. Freshman level. One hour lesson per week. (0-1-1)

MUSC 251,252.*Applied Music. Major area. Sophomore level. One hour lesson per week. (0-1-1)

MUSC 351, 352.*Applied Music. Major area. Junior level. One hour lesson per week. (0-1-1)

MUSC 451, 452.*Applied Music. Major area. Senior level. One hour lesson per week. (0-1-1)

MUSC 171, 172.*Applied Music. Minor area. Freshman level. One hour lesson per week. (0-1-1)

MUSC 271, 272.*Applied Music. Minor area. Sophomore level. One hour lesson per week. (0-1-1)

MUSC 371, 372.*Applied Music. Minor area. Junior level. One hour lesson per week. (0-1-1)

MUSC 471, 472.*Applied Music. Minor area. Senior level. One hour lesson per week. (0-1-1)

NURSING

NURS 1010. Introduction to Health Care. This course is designed to familiarize students with the full range of opportunities in the health profession, with a particular focus on the field of nursing. It provides an overview of the diversity and richness of careers in the health professions, including newer fields, such as genetics and informatics. The students explore the complex web of social, technological, and economic focus that shape the United States health care system, and the resulting opportunities and challenges to current and future health care providers. (1-0-1)

NURS 2600. Concepts of Professional Nursing.  NURS 2600 is a foundations course upon which subsequent nursing courses are built. Nursing as a profession, changes occurring over the years, current factors influencing nursing and health care, and nursing roles are the major topics of focus. Concepts and principles basic to nursing as a profession and concepts of health care are explored. (2-0-2)

NURS 2700. Clinical Therapeutics. NURS 2700 is a beginning nursing course in which basic physiological functioning of major biological systems, adaptive responses, and deviations in normal function are studied. Application of the nursing process to maintain health and in response to selected disruptions, with emphasis on scientifically based interventions and skills necessary for providing care to diverse client populations. Professional standards of care, ethical and legal responsibilities of the nurse when carrying out interventions and/or skills are reviewed. Use of the nursing process and skills learned in this course are reinforced and expanded throughout the curriculum. (3-3-4)

NURS 3000. Health Promotion. This course is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge and skills needed to provide health promotion and disease prevention interventions, essential components of comprehensive health care. The course includes content on health promotion, risk reduction, and disease prevention strategies across the life span, with emphasis on application to rural clients; health behavior models and theories; change theories; health education principles, theories, and strategies. (2-0-2)

NURS 3010. Professional Nursing Practice for RNs. This is an online course that is directed to the RN student returning to school for a baccalaureate degree in nursing. This is an introductory course to the BSN curriculum that examines concepts and perspectives in contemporary nursing. The content builds on the RN’s prior experience and nursing education. Examples of content include, ethical principles, health care economics, legislative process, nursing theories, health & wellness, critical thinking, current trends & issues in nursing. (2-0-2)

NURS 3030. Nutrition. A study of the principles of normal nutrition as they apply to the maintenance and promotion of health in individuals, families, groups, and communities. (2-0-2)

NURS 3100. Nursing of Adults I. Illnesses common in the adult population are explored, especially as presented in the acute care setting. Emphasis is on identification, treatment, and/or resolution of acute and long term health problems. Health promotion and disease prevention as they apply to specific disease entities are also discussed. The influence of genetics, alternative or cultural health practices, and application of nursing care in the community are reviewed as they relate to specific illnesses as well as collaborative care with other health care professionals. (4-6-6)

NURS 3150. Human Pathophysiology. A study of the physiological changes and states associated with disease. (3-0-3)

NURS 3200. Health Assessment. Assessment skills for clients across the life span are presented for the purpose of determining health status. Theory and skills necessary to obtain a comprehensive health history and complete physical examination are emphasized. Assessment skills in conducting an interview for the purpose of nutritional, cultural, and family pedigree information are incorporated. Special assessment techniques unique to children, older adults, and clients with functional disabilities are included. Physical findings indicating genetic disorders are also introduced. (3-2-4)

NURS 3500. Ethical Issues in Health Care. An exploration of contemporary ethical issues in health care delivery in light of various models of moral thought. Ethical decision-making models are used to analyze issues such as rationing of health care, abortion, euthanasia, surrogate motherhood, genetic engineering, and rights of subjects of research and experimentation. An elective course. An elective course. (3-0-3)

NURS 3600. Transcultural Health Care. An introduction to transcultural health care. The study of health care in a variety of cultural settings is accomplished through comparative analysis from a nursing perspective. Historical, political, and religious factors which impact health care beliefs of the caregiver and the client are studied within the framework of cultural health care theory. (3-0-3)

NURS 3610. Pharmacology. This course addresses the principles of nursing management in drug therapy, the basics of core drug knowledge, and patient-related variables. Nursing management of the patient’s response to medication is discussed according to the various body systems, pathological conditions, and major drug classifications. (3-0-3)

NURS 3700. Women’s Health Care Issues. An exploration of contemporary health care issues of particular concern to women. Violence, sexuality, health-compromising behaviors, and reproductive issues are included as well as the impact of the feminist movement, women’s health worldwide, and famous women who have contributed to health care reform. An elective course. (3-0-3)

NURS 3750. Nursing of the Family. Focuses on a family-centered approach to meeting health needs during the childbearing and childbearing years. (6-9-9)

NURS 3850. Gerontological Nursing. An exploration of the physiological and psychological changes that are common to the aging adult. Content includes theories of aging, issues related to healthy aging, illness, pharmacology, nutrition, sexuality, ethical/legal situations, and sociocultural influences. (2-3-3)

NURS 3900. Research in Nursing. An overview of the complete research process in nursing. Critical analysis of published research and evaluation for applicability to nursing practice. (3-0-3) [last offered Spring 2004]

NURS 4000. Senior Seminar. A seminar course to examine concepts and perspectives in contemporary nursing. The course will provide guided opportunities to synthesize concepts from all nursing courses. (3-0-3) [last offered Spring 2004]

NURS 4010. Leadership. Selected principles of leadership and management as they relate to health care delivery and to specific nursing service roles in which nurses function. Includes content on leadership roles, management theories, components of effective management, organizational dynamics, political and economic context of health care, and career development strategies. (3-0-3)

NURS 4100. Nursing of Adults II. A study of complex diseases in the adult population. Emphasis is on promotion and maintenance of health and prevention of disability in clients with acute, critical, and long-term health problems. (3-6-5)

NURS 4200. Psychiatric- Mental Health Nursing. The course acquaints the beginning practitioner with the essential concepts of mental health and mental illness and builds on the student’s knowledge of normal patterns of behavior, personality development, and defense mechanisms. The focus is on the use of the nursing process in caring for clients exhibiting emotional disorders and maladaptive behaviors. Therapeutic communication skills are integrated and practiced throughout the course. (3-6-5)

NURS 4300. Nursing of the Childrearing Family. A study of theory and skills utilized in the nursing process to provide care to the child and his/her family. (3-6-5) [last offered Fall 2003]

NURS 4350. Gerontological Nursing. An exploration of the physiological and psychological changes that are common to the aging adult. Content will include: theories of aging, pharmacology, nutrition, sociocultural influences, sexuality, and ethical and legal issues. Nursing interventions related to the aging adult will be considered, and components of health assessment will be reviewed. (2-0-2) [last offered Spring 2004]

NURS 4400. Community Health Nursing. A course designed to aid the baccalaureate nursing student in developing skills essential to population-based practice. This course requires the student to integrate prior knowledge and skills from maternal child health nursing, medical/surgical nursing, and mental health nursing with concepts of primary care in order to promote and maintain health and prevent disease. Emphasis will be on conducting community assessments, planning and implementing appropriate interventions based on assessment finding, presenting health data to groups, facilitating the development of community coalitions, and collaborating with community partners for effective change in health policy. (3-6-5)

NURS 4450. Population Focused Practice in Public Health Nursing for RNs. An online course designed to aid the nurse in developing and/or revitalizing skills essential to population-based practice in conjunction with clinical/prevention skills already obtained in the workforce. Emphasis will be on conducting community assessments, planning and implementing appropriate interventions based on assessment findings, presenting health data to groups, facilitating the development of community coalitions, and collaborating with community partners for effective change in health policy. (4-0-4)

NURS 4460. Directed Study in Community Based Nursing for RNs. This course is designed to supplement the online Population Health Nursing course. Other types of community based nursing, such as school health, occupational health, hospice, and prison health are explored. Students can choose to complete their population health project in public health or in any of the above listed areas. (0-3-1)

NURS 4500. Practicum. The final nursing clinical course in the baccalaureate nursing education program is known as the Practicum. This course involves selected experiences for the exploration and application of the basic concepts and theories of nursing leadership and management that facilitate transition to the professional role of the nurse. A self-directed contractual agreement is utilized to develop competencies that are expected of the baccalaureate prepared nurse within three broad categories: provider, manager, and member of the profession. (0-9-3) [last offered Spring 2004]

NURS 4800. Research in Nursing. An overview of basic research concepts and process. Critical analysis of published research and evaluation for applicability to nursing practice. (3-0-3)

NURS 4900. Practicum in Nursing. Students in this clinical course develop and implement a self-directed contract encompassing their nursing education to-date. Completion of this course, under the guidance of a faculty advisor and a preceptor, facilitates the student’s transition to the professional nursing role. (1-9-4)

HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE SERVICE COURSES

PEDS 1010. Lifetime Fitness. A course required of all students as a part of the general curriculum. The purpose of the course is to provide the student with scientific-based knowledge concerning practical application of physical fitness training and evaluation procedures while participating in a fitness program. (2-0-1)

PEDS Aquatics. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1100.            Beginning Swimming

PEDS 1180.            Canoeing

PEDS Fitness. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1020.            Aerobic Walking/Jogging

PEDS 1030.            Step Aerobics

PEDS 1800.            Aerobic Dance

PEDS Individual Sports. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1250.            Beginning Tennis

PEDS 1270.            Archery

PEDS 1280.            Beginning Golf

PEDS 1290.            Badminton

PEDS 1300.            Bowling

PEDS 1330.            Weight Training

PEDS 1900.            Beginning Judo

PEDS 1940.            Karate

PEDS Team Sports. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1560.            Soccer

PEDS 1590.            Volleyball

PEDS Dance. (0-2-1)

PEDS 1700.            Fundamentals of Dance

PEDS 1770.            Beginning Ballet

PEDS Varsity Sports.For student athletes ONLY! (0-2-1)

PEDS 1610.            Varsity Sports I

PEDS 1620.            Varsity Sports II

PEDS 1630.            Varsity Sports III

PEDS 1640.            Varsity Sports IV

PEDS 2000. CPR/First Aid. A course required of all students as part of the general curriculum. Designed to provide every student knowledge and practical skill practice in current first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques and HIV/AIDS education. (2-1-2)

PHYSICS

PHYS 1111. Introductory Physics I. Emphasizes classical mechanics, including Newton’s laws, rotational motion, and oscillators; wave motion; and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: MATH 1113 or permission of instructor. (3-2-4)

PHYS 1112. Introductory Physics II. Emphasizes classical electromagnetism, optics, and modern concepts, including relativity, quantum mechanics, and atomic and nuclear structure. Prerequisite: PHYS 1111. (3-2-4)

PHYS 1221. Solar System Astronomy. A survey course designed to expose the students to the nature and wonders of our solar system. The course will also cover the methods of space exploration which includes the Apollo lunar missions to the current on-going efforts such as the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Surveyor missions. The possibility of extraterrestrial life in the solar system and beyond will be covered. (3-0-3)

PHYS 1222. Stellar Astronomy. Introductory survey course for non-science majors. Does not require GEOL 1221/PHYS 1221. The main focus of this class is to put our solar system into a broader perspective provided by the rest of the universe. The sun as a star, physical properties of stars, principles of spectroscopy as applied to astronomy, binary stars, variable stars, star clusters, gaseous nebulae, stellar motions and distribution, Milky Way and external galaxies, expanding universe, cosmic time scale. (3-0-3)

PHYS 2025.  Introduction to Signal Processing.  Introduction to signal processing for discrete-time and continuous-time signals.  Topics include problems in filtering, frequency response, and applications of the Fourier transform and the Z-transform.  Laboratory emphasizes computer-based signal processing.  Prerequisite:  Calculus I.  (3-2-4)

PHYS 2040.  Linear Electric Circuits.  The basic analytical methods for passive networks composed of resistors, capacitors, and inductors are introduced.  Kirchoff's laws, mesh and node analysis, network theorems, and the solution of circuit equations using Laplace transforms are described.  Frequency response and transient behavior of circuits are analyzed.  Prerequisite:  Calculus I.  (3-2-4)

PHYS 2211. Principles of Physics I. Emphasizes classical mechanics, including Newton’s laws, rotational motion, and oscillators; wave motion; and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: Calculus I. (3-2-4)

PHYS 2212. Principles of Physics II. Emphasizes classical electromagnetism, optics, and modern concepts, including relativity, quantum mechanics, and atomic and nuclear structure. Prerequisite: PHYS 2211. (3-2-4)

PHYS 3111. Astronomy. The course is designed for students majoring in a physical science. Topics will include the study of the solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology in terms of current theories and modern methods of data collection. Observations and data collection will be carried out at the University observatory using a solid-state stellar photometer, CCD, or SLR camera. Data processing will also be an integral part of the laboratory section. Prerequisite: PHYS 1111 or PHYS 2211. (3-2-4)

PHYS 3211. DC/AC Electronics. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to analyze basic DC and AC circuits. The properties of series, parallel, complex, short, open, and bridge circuits will be measured and analyzed. It also focuses on the fundamentals of AC series, parallel, and complex circuits introducing capacitance, inductance, reactance, and magnetism. Prerequisite: MATH 1111. (3-0-3)

PHYS 4111. Physical Optics. An introduction to the basic theory and applications of physical optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1112 or PHYS 2212. (3-0-3)

PHYS 4211. Modern Physics. A survey of modern concepts in physics including special relativity, quantum theory, atomic and nuclear structure, and elementary particles. Prerequisites: PHYS 1112 or PHYS 2212, and Calculus II. (3-2-4)

PHYS 4311. Semiconductor Electronics. The fundamental principles of DC/AC electronics are taught and applied to the electronic devices commonly used by psychologists, biologists, engineers, chemists, geologists, and physicists. Prerequisite: PHYS 3211, or PHYS 1112, or PHYS 2212. (3-0-3)

PHYS 4411. Thermodynamics. The four laws of thermodynamics are developed and discussed. Applications of these laws will be discussed for systems in thermodynamics equilibrium. Various systems are discussed, i.e., gases, magnets, and condensed phases. Measurable quantities which describe these systems are related to general thermodynamic functions, equations of state, and energy functionals. Prerequisites: PHYS 1112 or 2212, and Calculus II. (3-2-4)

PHYS 4511. Mathematical Physics. A study of advanced mathematical functions and computational techniques and their application to problems in physics. Particular attention will be paid to Fourier series, complex variables, integral transforms, partial differential equations, and the modeling of data using computers. Prerequisites: PHYS 1112 or 2212, and Calculus III. (3-0-3)

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Note: Political science courses numbered 3000 and above are not open to freshmen.

POLS 1101. American Government. American political institutions and their development. A passing grade in this course satisfies the U.S. and Georgia Constitution requirements of Georgia State Code 32-171. (3-0-3)

POLS 2101. Introduction to Political Science. A general introduction to the scope and methods of the discipline of political science. Required of all political science majors and minors. (3-0-3)

POLS 3110. State and Local Government. A study of the organization, powers, functions, and political processes at the state and local levels, as well as the relationship between the state and national governments. A passing grade in this course satisfies the Georgia Constitution requirement of Georgia Code 32-171. (3-0-3)

POLS 3200. Introduction to the European Union. The development of the European Union. This is the base course for students participating in the E.U. Certification Program. (3-0-3)

POLS 3205. Comparative Politics.  This course presents the comparative method of studying political systems, with an emphasis on institutional arrangements and political behavior found in democratic and non-democratic political systems.  Transitions to democracy and political development are also examined.  Case studies include political systems in various regions of the world.  (3-0-3)

POLS 3210. Modern European Governments. A study of the constitutions, basic principles, governmental organizations, political party systems, and political methods of major countries in Europe. (3-0-3)

POLS 3230. Modern Latin American Governments. Impact of factors, forces, and personalities on Latin American development. (3-0-3)

POLS 3250. Africa and the Middle East. An historical and political study of African and Middle Eastern countries. (3-0-3)

POLS 4100. American Political Parties and Interest Groups. A study of the two types of political organizations in the United States which serve as linkages between the people and their government: political parties and interest groups. This course will focus on the development of political parties and interest groups, their structure and operations, and their roles in the political system. (3-0-3)

POLS 4200. Public Opinion, Elections, and Democracy. This course is a study of the formation, measurement, and role of public opinion in American democracy and of the role of the media and political organizations in shaping public opinion and thereby influencing political outcomes. Particular focus will be paid to the theoretical role of beliefs and opinion in a democracy; opinion surveys as measurements of public opinion; the role of ideology, informaiton, and partisanship; opinion and political participation, particularly voting behavior; and the impact of public opinion on public policies and decision making. (3-0-3)

POLS 4240. Political Behavior. A study of the political attitudes and behavior of citizens in the United States. This course will explore how citizens form their political attitudes and beliefs, the ways Americans participate politically, and the forces that influence voter turnout and vote choice. Although this class will focus on American citizens, comparisons and contrasts will be made with citizens of other nations, and of the attitudes and behaviors of government leaders and other political elites. (3-0-3)

POLS 4370. Black American Politics. The historical background, current status, and future prospects for African-American politics. (3-0-3)

POLS 4460. The Legislative Process. The structure, functions, and behavior of state and national legislative bodies. Emphasizes composition, leadership, procedures, party and interest groups’ roles, constituency influence, and representation theory. (3-0-3)

POLS 4470. American Presidency. Powers, duties, and responsibilities; historic and contemporary conceptions of the office; the presidency as an administrative institution. (3-0-3)

POLS 4550. Problems in Political Geography. A study of the impact of geography on world politics. (3-0-3)

POLS 4570. The Structure of American Government (Constitutional Law I). A study of the development of the separation of powers, federalism, and national and state regulatory authority. Prior credit in American Government is required. (3-0-3)

POLS 4580. Civil Liberties (Constitutional Law II). A survey of the constitutional law concerning property rights and economic freedom, and the personal rights and protections secured primarily by the Bill of Rights and the Civil War Amendments. Prior credit in American Government or its equivalent is required. Constitutional Law I is not a prerequisite for this course. (3-0-3)

POLS 4630. International Relations. A study of the theory and practices of international relations. (3-0-3)

POLS 4650. International Organization. A survey of the historical development of international organizations, with emphasis on the United Nations, its affiliated agencies, and other international agencies of our day. (3-0-3)

POLS 4670.  Ethnic Conflict, Political Violence, and Religion.  The course examines the underlying sources and foundations of ethnic conflict.  Special emphasis is placed upon the formation and development of national or ethnic identity.  In addition, the course focuses on the role of religion as a factor in ethnic conflict and political violence.  Comparison is made of the various strategies for political violence including assassination, terrorism, and guerilla warfare.  (3-0-3)

POLS 4690. American Foreign Policy. A study of government mechanism for the formulation and conduct of foreign policy, and an appraisal of current problems of U.S. Policy in Europe, Asia, Latin America, and the Third World. (3-0-3)

POLS 4700. Political Philosophy. An examination of the development of political philosophy and the perennial issues with which it is concerned through the works of such thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Marx. (3-0-3)

POLS 4730. Religion and Politics. This course surveys the interaction of religion in U.S. politics and political behavior, from the early colonial period through the contemporary political scene. Scholars have recognized that one cannot understand U.S. politics without an understanding of the role of religion in U.S. politics. This is because Americans are among the most religious people in the world and, despite our “separation of church and state,” religion plays prominently in our politics and our political culture. (3-0-3)

POLS 4740.  Theology and Political Thought.  This course will provide a survey of theologians or philosophers in political discussion throughout the period in which those arguments were commonplace (the 1st through the 17th centuries).  Philosophers include Tertullian, Eusebuis, Ambrose, Augustine, Scottus, Aquinas, William of Ockham, erasmus, Martin Luther, and John Calvin.  The course will investigate, among other topics, contributions of these philosophers to theories of justice, power, authority, and liberty.  (3-0-3)

POLS 4750. Political Thought in Creative Literature. Examines political issues and ideas from around the world through literature: novels, drama, short stories, and poetry. (3-0-3)

POLS 4760. American Political Thought. A careful examination of the basic ideas about man and government that have formed the basis for political practice and debate within the United States. Attention will be given to the principles of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution as developed especially by Hamilton, Madison, and Jefferson and to the interpretation of these principles by Lincoln and other American statesmen. (3-0-3)

POLS 4800. Emergence of the Third World. The major political factors, conditions and personalities impacting the emergence of the Third World. (3-0-3)

POLS 4900. Special Topics in Political Science. A course on selected issues, problems, and literature in political science. (3-0-3)

POLS 4920. Political Science Internship. Internships with government agencies are available for qualified students. See the Coordinator of Intern Programs for information.Concurrent enrollment in INTN 4920 is required. (0-7-3)

POLS 4930. Political Science Internship. Internships with government agencies are available for qualified students. See the Coordinator of Intern Programs for information. Concurrent enrollment in INTN 4920 is required. (0-7-3)

POLS 4950. Senior Seminar. Required of all political science majors, this capstone research course requires students to integrate the basic concepts, methods, and sub-fields of political science, and to relate these to the contemporary world. It further develops skills in research and communications. Prerequisite: 15 hours of upper division political science including Comparative Politics, International Relations, and Political Philosophy or permission of the instructor. (2-0-2)

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 1101. Introductory Psychology. A basic science oriented course dealing with the systematic and experimental approach to the understanding of behavior. (3-0-3)

PSYC 1102. Psychology as a Natural Science. An introduction to modern scientific psychology with emphasis upon methodological and philosophical foundations. The scientific principles of learning, cognition, and motivation will be examined as well as a survey of the neural substrates of behavior. (3-0-3)

PSYC 2103. Human Growth & Development. Concepts of human development as derived from studies of prenatal and postnatal development including the periods of infancy and childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and senescence. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3301. Psychological Statistics. An introduction to the basic principles of descriptive and inferential statistics.  In addition to discussing the theory of statistics, the course emphasizes the interpretation of data and the application of statistical methods comonly used in the social sciences. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3308. Psychosocial Aspects of Aging. A thorough discussion of human aging, focusing on the physiological and psychosocial aspects of aging, as well as a historical and contemporary examination of the various psychological and sociological aspects of death and dying. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 or SOCI 1101 or consent of instructor. May substitute SOCI 3308. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3309. Human Sexuality. A thorough discussion of human sexuality, focusing on the psychological, social, anthropological, and physiological aspects of human sexuality and with treatment of sexual problems, therapies, and deviancy. PSYC 1101 OR SOCI 1101. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3310. Educational Psychology. A survey of the basic principles of the psychology of learning and testing as applied to Education. Psychology majors and minors are advised to take PSYC 4410 or PSYC 3331 in lieu of this course. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3311. Social Psychology. Basic factors influencing interpersonal behavior, and social influences on personality. Prerequisites: PSYC 1101. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3331. Introduction to Psychological Testing. Theory of psychological measurement, types and characteristics of tests, methods for evaluating tests, and review of some of the more commonly used psychological tests. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3337. Theories of Personal Relationships. A survey of the major theories and research findings regarding personal relationships. The topics of interpersonal attraction, liking, loving, romance, communication, and therapeutic interventions will be covered. Prerequisite:PSYC 1101. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3338. Sport Psychology. A survey of the science of sport psychology in which the principles of psychology are applied in a sport setting. The course will explore the enhancement of both athletic performance and the social-psychological aspects of human enrichment through sport. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3340. Mass Media Influences and Modern Consciousness. An examination of the forces of the modern mass media, including film, music, radio books, magazines, and the internet, with emphasis upon television, and how they influence the psychosocial development of the individual and normative political and social behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC1101 or SOCI 1101. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3350.  Health Psychology.  This course discusses health and illness from a biopsychosocial perspective.  Although psychological, social, and behavioral influences on health will be a key focus, the biological aspects of health and illness will also be addressed.  Topics include the functioning of different systems of the body, the biological impact of behaviors such as smoking, and the emotional and physical experience of stress, pain, and diseases such as cancer and AIDS. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3365. Biopsychology. A survey of the relationship between the behavior of organisms and the biological processes mediating the behavior. The emphasis is on the physiological, neurochemical and evolutionary aspects of motivation, emotion, and learning. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 or consent of instructor. (3-0-3)

PSYC 3380. Sensation &Perception. Consideration of the way in which stimuli in our world, such as light and sound, act on the human sensory systems and how the brain transforms raw sensory information into meaningful perceptions. Prerequisite:PSYC1101. (3-0-3)

PSYC 4395. Theory and Research in Caregiving. This course is designed to introduce you to research and theory in caregiving from a psychosocial perspective.  We will discuss general themes and issues related to caregiving as well as how the experience of caregiving varies across cultures and patient populations.  We will learn about various illnesses that influence the experience of caregiving, and also, hopefully, discuss interventions to ease the burden of caregiving.  Prerequisite:  PSYC 1101.  (3-0-3)

PSYC 4401. Abnormal Psychology. A survey course of the major behavior disorders, their symptomatology, etiology, and treatment. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101. (3-0-3)

PSYC 4402. Principles of Behavior Modification. A survey of learning theory and principles applicable to the modification of human maladaptive behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 2103. (3-0-3)

PSYC 4403. Social and Psychological Aspects of Addiction. This course presents current scientific thinking concerning addiction to legal and illegal drugs. The student will also be exposed to a variety of treatment techniques and observe the treatment process in several therapeutic settings. Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 or PSYC 1101. (3-0-3)

PSYC 4404. Industrial Psychology. A survey of psychological principles and practice related to personnel selection, training decisions, and design of the workplace. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101. (3-0-3)

PSYC 4405. Theories and Techniques of Counseling. A general introduction to various theories and techniques of counseling and their applicability to various kinds of clientele. Prerequisite: Ten (10) hours of Psychology and permission of the instructor or Department Chair. (3-0-3)

PSYC 4410. Cognitive Psychology. An outline of the central phenomena of human and animal learning including those processes related to conditioning, discrimination, and the retaining and processing of information. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101. (3-0-3)

PSYC 4411. History and Systems of Psychology. A survey of the origins and developments of psychology as a science, including its various systems or schools of thought and the current status of each. PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor. (3-0-3)

PSYC 4414. Psychology of Language. An examination of contemporary theories and studies of language comprehension, speech production, neurocognition, language development, and language disorders. Prerequisite:PSYC 1101. (3-0-3)

PSYC 4422. Theories of Personality. A survey of the most important theories of personality. Emphasis is placed upon experimental validation and the implications of the theories for psychology and other disciplines. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101. (3-0-3)

PSYC 4431 Experimental Psychology. A study of the rationale of experimentation and techniques for the isolation and measurement of variables. Laboratory experience is provided in the construction, execution, and interpretation of scientific experiments on behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 and PSYC 3301. (3-0-3)

PSYC 4450. Senior Seminar in Psychology.  In-depth discussion of major issues and schools of thought in psychology.  This course is designed to provide students with a capstone experience by revisiting topics covered in previous courses.  The intent is to provide review and closure for psychology majors.  Prerequisite:  PSYC 1101, declared major in psychology and must have senior standing. (3-0-3)

PSYC 449A. Special Topics in Psychology. A course on selected issues, problems, and literature in psychology. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and Department Chair. (3-0-3)

PSYC 4492. Psychology Internships. Internships in psychology are available for qualified students. See the Coordinator of Intern Programs for Information. Prerequisite: Permission of advisor and Department Chair. (0-7-3)

PSYC 4498. Senior Research II. A three-hour course in basic research requiring the student to specify a problem, review the relevant literature, and collect and analyze data for summary presentation in journal form. Prerequisite: PSYC 3301 and PSYC 4431. (3-0-3)

LEARNING SUPPORT READING

READ 1000. Improvement of Reading. An Academic Assistance course designed to aid the student in the development of effective learning techniques. Emphasis is given to comprehension, vocabulary, listening and note taking as these skills apply to university level courses the student is presently taking. (2-0-2)

SOCIOLOGY

SOCI 1101. Introductory Sociology. A general analysis of human social behavior, culture, social groups, and social institutions. (3-0-3)

SOCI 1160. Contemporary Social Problems. In this course a limited number of current social problems are selected for in-depth analysis. The student is introduced to a sociological approach that examines the structures and processes that contribute to “problems.” Each problem is also examined for societal changes that might ameliorate the identified conditions. Several theoretical approaches are utilized. Prerequisite: SOCI 1101. (3-0-3)

SOCI 2293. Sociology of the Family. An in-depth analysis of the American family with cross-cultural and historical comparisons. Emphasis is placed on the various changes occurring within the American family. (3-0-3)

SOCI 2295. The American Mosaic: Cultures of the United States. A study of the culture of the United States from the perspective of ethnic identity, ethnic relations, sex and gender, and socio-economic class. Emphasis will be placed on the use of anthropological and sociological methods and approaches to enhance understanding of contemporary socio-cultural lifeways. (2-0-2)

SOCI 3308. Psychosocial Aspects of Aging. A thorough discussion of human aging, focusing on the physiological and psychosocial aspects of aging, as well as a historical and contemporary examination of the various psychological and sociologcal aspects of death and dying. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 or SOCI 1101 or consent of instructor. May substitute PSYC 3308. (3-0-3)

SOCI 3309. Human Sexuality. A thorough discussion of human sexuality, focusing on the psychological, social, anthropological, and physiological aspects of human sexuality and with treatment of sexual problems, therapies, and deviance. May substitute PSYC 3309. (3-0-3)

SOCI 3311. Social Psychology. Basic factors influencing interpersonal behavior, and social influences on personality. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101. May substitute PSYC 3311. (3-0-3)

SOCI 3318. Sociology of Religion. An examination of classical and contemporary sociological theory and method as applied in analysis of religion. Prerequistite: SOCI 1101. (3-0-3)

SOCI 3325. Introduction to Social Work. A survey of the field of social work. Content includes an examination of social work concepts, values, and ideology; origin and history; methods of practice; practice settings; and current issues in the delivery of social services. Prerequisite: SOCI 1101. (3-0-3)

SOCI 3331. Sociological Statistics. An introduction to the basic principles of descriptive and inferential statistics. The course emphasizes a nonmathematical approach to the theory of statistics and the application of statistical methods and research designs found commonly in the social sciences. May substitute PSYC 3301. Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 (3-0-3)

SOCI3340. Mass Media Influences and Modern Consciousness. An examination of the forces of the modern mass media, including film, music, radio, books, magazines, and the internet, with emphasis upon television, and how they influence the psychosocial development of the individual and normative political and social behavior. Prerequisite:PSYC 1101 or SOCI 1101. (3-0-3)

SOCI 3350. Criminology. A study of the legal and social aspects of crime. The making of laws, the breaking of laws, and the sanctioning of law violators are examined. Police, courts, and prevention are included as critical aspects of understanding crime. Prerequisite: SOCI 1101. (3-0-3)

SOCI 4403. Social and Psychological Aspects of Addiction. This course includes a thorough consideration of genetic, biological, pharmacological, sociological, and psychological aspects of addiction to legal and illegal drugs. In addition to questions of causation, treatment, and prevention strategies are discussed and observed. Upper division standing required. May substitute PSYC 4403. (3-0-3)

SOCI 4409. Social Change. An analysis of the various theories and processes which explain and underlie historical and contemporary changes in society. Prerequisite: SOCI 1101. (3-0-3)

SOCI 4410. Social Organization. An examination of the function and structure of kinship developmental processes in band, tribal, peasant, and industrial societies. Illustration of inter- and intra-societal variation, and data for construction of formal models of process and variation in kinship systems will be explored. Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. May substitute ANTH 4410. (3-0-3)

SOCI 4411. Race and Minority Group Relations. An analysis of the development of minority group relations in the United States, with emphasis on black-white relationships in the South. Prerequisite: SOCI 2293 or permission of instructor. (3-0-3)

SOCI 4417. Women in Society. An analysis of women in the United States emphasizing historical and contemporary relationships of women to education, religion, law, politics, employment, family, and sexuality. Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 or permission of instructor. (3-0-3)

SOCI 4420. Development of Sociological Theory. A comprehensive survey of classical sociological thought emphasizing the major theorists of each period. Prerequisite: SOCI 1101. Upper division standing required. (3-0-3)

SOCI 4430. Contemporary Sociological Theory. A critical examination of the proliferation of sociological theories in the post World War II era. Topics include the development of modern systems theory, symbolic interaction theory and ethnomethodology, postmodern social theory, feminist theory, and neofunctionalism. Prerequisite: SOCI 1101. Recommended for advanced students. (3-0-3)

SOCI 4440 Methods of Social Research. A comprehensive study of the various methods of social research design and technique, including a directed application. Prerequisite: SOCI 1101, SOCI 3331 or equilavent and upper division standing required. (3-0-3)

SOCI 4445. Deviant/Social Behavior. A review of the history and research in the area of deviant behavior. The social basis of definitions, theories, and treatment of deviant social behavior will be examined. Prerequisite: SOCI 1101. (3-0-3)

SOCI 4450. Seminar in Sociology.  A capstone course for the sociology major that fosters in-depth study and analysis of selected aspects of sociology, including major schools of thought, research methods and practical applications.  Students must participate in seminar discussions of assigned readings and will complete a term paper.  Prerequisite:  SOCI 1101, declared major in sociology and must have senior standing.. (3-0-3)

SOCI 449A. Special Topics in Sociology. A course on selected issues, problems, and literature in sociology. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair. (3-0-3)

SOCI 4492. Sociology Internships. Directed internships are available for qualified students. (See the Intern Program Coordinator for information.) Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair. (3-0-3)

SOCI4498. Research. Individual research project under faculty direction. Prerequisite:Permission of instructor & Department Chair. (3-0-3)

SOCIAL SCIENCE

SOSC 1000. Background to Current Events. Survey of the political, historical, and geographic aspects of the major events in the modern world. All regions of the world will be surveyed with special emphasis on North America. Not open to students with credit in World Geography Survey GEOG 1101, or SOSC 1101. (2-0-2)

SOSC 1101. The World and Its Peoples. A survey of world human cultures. Emphasis will be on geography, history, economic systems, sociological foundations, governmental systems, and religion. An attempt will be made to integrate the various social sciences using a world regional approach. Not open to students with prior credit in GEOG 1101. (3-0-3)

SOSC 4900. Special Topics in Social Science. A course on selected issues, problems, and literature in social science. (3-0-3)

SOSC 4920. Social Science Internship. Internships with government agencies are available for qualified students. See the Coordinator of Intern Programs for information. Concurrent enrollment in INTN4920 is required. (0-7-3)

SPANISH

SPAN 1001. Elementary Spanish I. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish and to the culture of Spanish-speaking regions. Not open to students with two or more years of high school Spanish. Designed for students with no previous knowledge of Spanish. Not open to native speakers. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

SPAN 1002. Elementary Spanish II. Continued listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish with further study of the culture of Spanish-speaking regions. Prerequisite: SPAN 1001 or one unit in Spanish. Not open to native speakers. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

SPAN 2001. Intermediate Spanish I. Initial exposure to short literary works by authors from Spain and Latin America complemented by biographical and cultural notes. Conversational format with weekly written assignments. Prerequisite: SPAN 1002 or two entrance units in Spanish. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

SPAN 2002. Intermediate Spanish II. Continues building verbal and grammatical skills and expands exposure to touchstones of Hispanic literature from both continents. Prerequisite: SPAN 2001 or three units of high school Spanish or acceptable scores on the placement test. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

SPAN 3110. Spanish Culture and Civilization to 1700. Survey of the civilization and culture of Spain from prehistoric times to 1700 A.D. Reading skills in Spanish will be reinforced by discussions, lab work and written examinations in the target language. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of Spanish or the equivalent. (3-0-3)

SPAN 3120. Spanish Culture and Civilization After 1700. Survey of the civilization and culture of Spain from 1700 to the present. Reading skills in Spanish will be reinforced by discussions, lab work and written examinations in the target language. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of Spanish or the equivalent. (3-0-3)

SPAN 3130. Latin American Culture and Civilization. Culture and civilization of Latin America from pre-Colombian times to the present. Lectures, readings and assignments in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

SPAN 4010. Spanish Conversation. Focuses on contemporary events and popular Hispanic culture and refinement of verbal skills first acquired by students in the introductory sequence of the target language. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of Spanish or the equivalent. (3-0-3)

SPAN 4020. Advanced Grammar and Composition. Inductive study of Spanish grammar. Excerpts from literary masters illustrate principles of grammar that students analyze, personalize and practice. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of Spanish or the equivalent. (3-0-3)

SPAN 4050. Nineteenth Century Drama. Study of the outstanding Spanish dramatists of the nineteenth century. Emphasis on Romanticism, its origins and aftermath. Representative plays analyzed using various critical approaches. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of Spanish or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

SPAN 4210. Golden Age. Study of works by Calderón, Lope de Vega and other masters of the period. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of Spanish or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

SPAN 4220. Contemporary Latin American Novel. Representative novels of the Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries read and discussed. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of Spanish or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

SPAN 4230. Modernism. In-depth study of this nineteenth century movement with emphasis on poetry and the short story. Authors of Spain and Latin America. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of Spanish or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

SPAN 4240. Spanish Poetry from the Golden Age. A study of trends in poetry since 1700. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of Spanish or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

SPAN 4250. Cervantes. A study of the Quijote and other works by Cervantes. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of Spanish or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

SPAN 4260. The Spanish Novel of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. A study of selected novels to show literary, social, and political trends in Spain. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of Spanish or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

SPAN 4270. Contemporary Spanish Literature. Emphasis on the short story and drama. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of Spanish or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (3-0-3)

SPAN 4950, 4960, 4970. Study Abroad. The study of Spanish language and culture in a native environment. Designed specifically for those students in the University System of Georgia Study Abroad Program. Up to 9 hours of credit may be given upon successful completion of the program. Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of SPAN 2002.

THEATRE

THEA 1100. Theatre Appreciation. Surveys the contributions of performers, designers, and playwrights to a theatre production. The audience as co-author of the theatre event is also examined. The customary sequence involved in producing a play will be discussed. Information will also be presented about audiences, theatres, performers, and the conventions of the theatre of several eras. (3-0-3)

THEA 1110.  Performance Skills for Business and Professions.  A training and development workshop focused on the cultivation of individual performance skills vital to success in business and professions, which are especially relevant in the age of modern media.  (3-0-3)

THEA 1111. Performance and Production Practicum. Introductory level study of the process and craft of producing theatre through application and prctice. Selection by audition or approval of instructor. May be repeated twice. (0-2-1)

THEA 2040. Acting I—Basic Technique. An introduction to the principles of acting, including preparation of the actor’s instrument, physical and vocal technique, emotional life, anlaysis and creation of character. (3-0-3)

THEA 2111. Performance and Production Practicum. Intermediate level study of the process and craft of producing theatre through application and practice. Selection by audition or approval of instructor. May be repeated twice. (0-2-1)

THEA 2220.  Voice and Articulation.  Study in the physiological and acoustical aspects of vocal delivery and participation in a regimen of exercises to develop articulation and vocal expression.  (3-0-3)

THEA 2540.  Introduction to Performance.  An introduction to the field of performance studies and the performance of non-dramatic texts.  The construction of solo performance pieces from dialogues, narrative, ehtnography and literature is the primary focus of the course.  (3-0-3)

THEA 3040.  Acting II- Scence Study.  An acting studio focused on the application of technique and methodology to the given circumstances of a performance text.

THEA 3111. Performance and Production Practicum. Advanced level study of the process and craft of producing theatre through application and practice. Selection by audition or approval of instructor. May be repeated. (0-2-1)

THEA 4040.  Acting III - Advanced Technique.  Intensive process and performance studio training in contemporary acting methodologies.  (3-0-3)

THEA 4080.  Acting IV - Period Styles.  This course serves to introduce students to the basic techniques and methodologies performing period plays.  Particular emphasis is given to approaches to Shakespeare and developing an overall approach to style work.  (3-0-3)

THEA 4111. Performance and Production Capstone. A capstone course designed to build on the student’s cumulative experiential work in the process and craft of producing theatre through application and practice. Selection by audition or approval of instructor. (0-4-3)

THEA 4545.  Performance Studies.  Advanced studies in the performance of non-dramatic text with emphasis on the development of original performance programs.  (3-0-3)

THEA 4770.  Special Topics in Theatre.  Advanced opportunties for the study of topics to meet special needs and interests of students, presented in conjunction with special programming of the department, or drawing on areas of faculty expertise not covered by the standing offerings.  May be repeated once.  (3-0-3)

ORIENTATION

UNIV 1000. Orientation. The general purpose of UNIV 1000 is to make new students at GSW more effective consumers of their education by enhancing their survival in college during the first semester of their enrollment. The intention of this course is to prepare students to deal successfully and responsibly with their academic obligations and the resources offered by GSW. This course is required of all first-time entering students, with the exception of part-time students and transfer students who have earned more than nine semester hours of credit. (1-0-1)

UNIV 2500. Introduction to Contemporary International Cultures. This course introduces the student to the contemporary culture of a selected country. Topics may include literature, language, music, philosophy, religion, science, education, art, politics, history, healthcare, and/or business. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3-0-3)

UNIV 3500. Intermediate Contemporary International Cultures. This course studies the contemporary culture of a selected country. Topics may include literature, language, music, philosophy, religion, science, education, art, politics, history, healthcare, and/or business. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3-0-3)

UNIV 4000. Advanced Contemporary International Cultures. This course studies in depth the contemporary culture of a selected country, and the student gains first hand knowledge through a service project with the people of the country. Areas of contemporary culture to be explored may include literature, language, music, philosophy, religion, science, education, art, politics, history, healthcare, and/or business. Learning activities include immersion into the selected culture, lecture, small group discussion, pertinent readings, and participation in the required service project. Offered in the Spring Semester, enrollment is limited, admission to the course is by application through the Dean of Arts & Sciences. (3-0-3)

UNIV 4010. Contemporary American Cultures. This course studies in depth the contemporary culture of a selected area of the United States other than southwest Georgia, and the student gains first hand knowledge through a service project with the people of the area. Areas of contemporary culture to be explored may include literature, language, music, religion, education, art, politics, history, healthcare, physical geography, and/or business. Learning activities include immersion into the selected culture, lecture, small group discussion, pertinent readings, and participation in the required service project. Offered in the Spring Semester, enrollment is limited, admission to the course is by application through the Dean of Arts & Sciences. (3-0-3)

GRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ACCOUNTING (ACCT)
ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)
BIOLOGY (BIOL)
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BUSA)
CHEMISTRY (CHEM)
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CIS)
COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSCI)
ECONOMICS (ECON)
EDUCATION - CERTIFICATION (EDCF)
EARLY CHILDHOOD (EDEC)
EDUCATION - MIDDLE GRADES (EDMG)
EDUCATION - READING (P-12) (EDRG)
EDUCATION - SECONDARY EDUCATION (7-12) (EDSC)
EDUCATION - SPECIAL EDUCATION (P-12) (EDSP)
EDUCATION (EDUC)
ENGLISH (ENGL)
GEOLOGY (GEOL)
HISTORY (HIST)
MATHEMATICS (MATH)
HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE (PHEG)
PHYSICS (PHYS)
POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLS)
PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)
SOCIOLOGY (SOCI)
SOCIAL SCIENCES (SOSC)

ACCOUNTING

ACCT 5180.  Contemporary Issues in Accounting.  An in-depth discussion and synthesis of selected issues of current importance to the accounting profession.  A simulation project designed to promote a greater understanding of the business environment is required.  This course may not be applied to master’s degree requirements.  Prerequisite:  Graduate standing and ACCT 2102.  (3-0-3)

ACCT 5230.  Income Tax Accounting.  A graduate-level study of federal income tax laws with emphasis on the taxation of individuals.  This course may not be applied to master’s degree requirements.  A research project or projects will be required.  Prerequisite:  Graduate standing and ACCT 2102.  (3-0-3)

ACCT 5240.  Not-for-Profit Accounting.  Accounting principles and practices for governmental and nonprofit organizations, with emphasis on state and local governments.  A case study or research paper on a governmental or nonprofit accounting topic is required.  This course is offered on the graduate level but may not be applied to master’s degree requirements.  Prerequisite:  Graduate standing and two intermediate-level courses in financial accounting.  (3-0-3)

ACCT 5290. Internal Controls and Auditing. A survey of the range of attest services currently provided by accounting professionals, with particular emphasis on the evaluation of internal controls and the independent financial audit.  An individual research project is required.  This course is offered on the graduate level but may not be applied to master’s degree requirements.  Prerequisite:  Graduate standing and two intermediate-level courses in financial accounting.  (3-0-3)

ACCT 6110. Advanced Cost Accounting.  A seminar on selected topics in developing areas related to the costing of products and services for a variety of entities. Prerequisites: ACCT 3280 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. (3-0-3)

ACCT 6130. Income Tax Accounting For Business. Interpretation and application of the income tax laws to business organizations, particularly corporations and partnerships. Prerequisite:  ACCT 4230 or equivalent with grade of C or better. (3-0-3)

ACCT 6140. Advanced Financial Accounting. An in-depth study of selected problems in financial accounting. Topics may vary but will likely include the preparation of consolidated financial statements, accounting for international transactions, and partnership accounting. Prerequisite: Two intermediate-level courses in financial accounting. (3-0-3)

ACCT 6150. Not-For-Profit Accounting. Accounting principles and practices for governmental and nonprofit organization. Emphasis is on accounting practices of state and local governments, hospitals and healthcare organizations, and the federal government. Prerequisite: Two intermediate-level courses in financial accounting. (3-0-3)

ACCT 6160. Advanced Internal Controls And Auditing.  An in-depth study of selected problems related to independent financial audit and other attest services. Topics may vary but will likely include professional roles in public accounting, ethical standards, statistical sampling, reporting requirements, and EDP auditing. Prerequisite: Two intermediate-lvel courses in financial accounting and ACCT 4290. (3-0-3)

ACCT 6170. Accounting Information Systems. An advanced study of computerized information systems with special emphasis on the preparation and reporting of financial information and an analysis of the organization’s internal controls. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and ACCT 2102. (3-0-3)

ACCT 6180. Contemporary Issues In Accounting.  A seminar on special problems and topics of current importance related to various specialties within the accounting profession. These specialties may include financial and/or managerial accounting, systems, tax, and/or other areas and will draw upon students’ knowledge of related fields, such as finance, economics, and law. Prerequisite: Two intermediate-level courses in financial accounting. (3-0-3)

ACCT 6390. Accounting Internship. Students will participate in a professional accounting work experience with a public accounting firm, a business, or other organization under the supervision of a CPA or management official with the sponsoring organization. Students will be expected to complete a significantly challenging project at the sponsoring organization and submit a written report summarizing the experience. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the  Master of Business Administration degree program and permission of the Dean. Students must have completed one semester of academic work at GSW, although this requirement might be fulfilled at the undergraduate level if the student received his/her baccalaureate degree at this institution. Student's overall GPA must be at least 3.0. (0-V-3)

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 579A. Directed Study and Research. A directed program on research topics and reading assignments designed to meet the special needs of the student. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chair. (3-0-3)

BIOLOGY

BIOL 6750. Special Problems in Biology. Individual work providing the student an opportunity to follow a specific program of study under the direction of a qualified instructor of his choice. Must be prearranged with advisor, department chair, and instructor. May be used only once in the student’s program. (0-3-3)

BIOL 7900. History and Philosophy of Natural Sciences.  A study of the historical development of the sciences demonstrating the interdependence of science and technology and the social, economic, and political forces in society.  Taught when enrollment justifies.  (3-0-3)

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

BUSA 6025. Business Internship. Practical experience gained by “employment” in the workplace and in the accomplishment of one or more special projects pertinent to the activities of the sponsoring agency or organization. Graduate students will assume leadership roles in this course, and will receive assignments based on their areas of expertise. Prerequisite:  MBA standing. (0-V-3)

BUSA 6045. Honors course in Free Enterprise. ) This course is designed to inform, instruct, enlighten students about the free enterprise system. Students should gain, through an APPLIED approach, an appreciation of a myriad of business concepts vital in today’s business environment including, but not limited to: market research, new product development, advertising and sales promotion, salesmanship, management, and accounting/financial. Graduate students will assume leadership roles in this course, and will receive assignments based on their areas of expertise. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6100. History And Philosophy of Management. A review of the history of the development of the philosophy and practice of managing people in organizations and organized activity. Emphasis is upon independent research and in-depth discussions of results of case studies and projects. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6110. Business Ethics. This course is designed to examine the relationship between ethical theory and business decision making. The goal is an integration of ethics and social responsibility into real-world business situations. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6120. Marketing Management. This is an integrative course designed to demonstrate the complexity and dimensional nature of marketing decisions. The course will focus on marketing policy and strategy from a manager’s prospective. Prerequisite: MKTG 3800 or BUSA 5800 (with a grade of C or better), and MGNT 3600 or BUSA 5600 (with a grade of C or better). (3-0-3)

BUSA 6130. Production/Operations Management. ) This course focuses on methods for designing and improving productive systems. Focus will be placed on the value added transformation of inputs to output and the creation of product and services. Students utilize and develop critical and strategic thinking skills in order to analyze current concepts and developments in the field of operations management. Prerequisite: BUSA 3050 or equivalent, MGNT 3600 or BUSA 5600 (with a grade of C or better). (3-0-3)

BUSA 6140. Advanced Business Finance. A seminar focusing on selected issues in contemporary corporate finance and the current business environment. Topics will vary but will likely include issues related to international finance, management of working capital, financial distress, and merger acquisitions. Prerequisite: BUSA 3150 or BUSA 5150 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6150. Human Resource Management. This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of human resource management with emphasis on management responsibilities regarding the organization’s human resources. Prerequisite: BUSA 5600 or MGNT 3600. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6170. Quantitative Management. An introduction to quantitative decision making techniques to problems of business. It includes material on Decision Analysis, Linear Programming, Inventory Management and Project Scheduling, Stochastic Models as well as some advanced statistical topics like Regression, ANOVA, Quality Analysis, and Non Parametric Tests. Prerequisite: BUSA 3050 or equivalent. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6180. International Business Practices. A course designed to focus on five aspects of the cross-border environment: exchange rates and international capital markets, trading patterns and regimes, regulatory content, and political content. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6200. Managerial Control. A study of the concepts for analysis and interpretation of financial data as a basis for business decisions. Prerequisite: ACCT 2102. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6540. Organizational Theory and Behavior. This course examines the topics of leadership in organizations, including analysis of both theoretical and operational aspects of leadership. Prerequisite: MGNT 3600 or BUSA 5600 or equivalent with grade of C or better. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6550. Small Business Management. Students are provided an opportunity to learn how to manage a newly-organized or acquired business. Major emphasis is placed on design, integration and operation of all aspects of small business. Extensive use made of experiential exercises. Prerequisite: MGNT 3600 or BUSA 5600 or equivalent with grade of C or better. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6560. Purchasing Management. Emphasizing problem identification, analysis and solution as they related to the purchasing function. While the course focuses mainly on the industrial sector, purchasing in the area of consumer goods will also be addressed. Prerequisite: MGNT 3600 or BUSA 5600 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. (3-0-3)

BUSA 6570. Labor Management Relations. This course focuses on understanding the process through which employers and union negotiate, constraints on both groups, and the shared responsibility for administering negotiated contracts. Analysis of problems in the process, and procedures for minimizing these problems will be explored. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (3-0-3)

BUS 6615.  International Business Experience.  A study of how business is constructed in foreign countries and how culture impacts business decisions. Emphasis will be placed on relations between the U.S. and a selected country, with an end-of-semester trip to visit businesses in the country studies. In this course, graduate students assume leadership roles and will receive assignments based on their areas of expertise. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and minimum GPA of 3.50. (3-0-3)

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 6680. Advanced Topics in Chemistry. A three hour directed study course designed to provide the student an opportunity to investigate a specific advanced topic of interest through research, experimentation, and data interpretation. Written and oral presentation of project results will be required. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chair. (3-0-3)

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS

CIS 5310.  Decision Support Systems.  This course concentrates in the use of computer systems to help and assist in the decision making process.  The first part of the course has been designed to cover the fundamental conceptual aspects of human decision making.  The second part of the course will focus in the design and construction of the decision support systems (DSSs).  Prerequisite:  CSCI 3500.  (3-0-3)

CIS 5320.  Object-Oriented Design and Analysis.  This course introduces students to the formal process of system development using the Unified Modeling Language (UML).  The course emphasizes object-oriented systems analysis and design with primary focus on the analysis phase through logical modeling techniques (use case diagrams, class diagrams, sequence diagrams, etc.).  Students are required to submit a project using UML diagrams and available software.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 1302.  (3-0-3)

CIS 6410. Client-Server Systems. This course will discuss all major issues of client/server architecture, including applications, communications, distributed database systems and specialization of clients and servers. Students will implement a complete client/server system on a popular client/server database management system such as ORACLE. Prerequisite: CSCI 4400. (3-0-3)

CIS 6420.  Data Mining.  This course is aimed at preparing students with comprehensive, practical look at the concepts and techniques needed to get the most out of business data.  It includes several algorithms for data mining, provides in-depth, practical coverage of essential data mining topics, including OLAP and data warehousing , data preprocessing, concept description, association rules, classification and prediction, and cluster analysis.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 440/CSCI 4400.  (3-0-3)

CIS 6720.  Distributed Web Applications.  This course will survey the tools, techniques, and design principles behind distributed web applications, and will cover many of the design, deployment, and maintenance issues.  You'll learn the concepts of web services architecture, SOAP (Simple Open Access Protocol) and other leading web services standards- WSDL (Web Service Description Language) and UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration protocol).  Prerequisite:  CSCI 1302 or CSCI 4310.  (3-0-3)

CIS 6800. Human Computer, Interaction & Interface Design. This course will discuss interface design between user and computer, user capabilities and limitations, designing systems for people, evaluation and testing of systems, usability engineering, and ergonomics.  Software and GUI languages/packages will be used.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 4300. (3-0-3)

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 5110.  HDLs with Applications to Digital System.  This course introduces students to hardware description languages and associated methodologies for digital and computer system design.  In-depth coverage includes applications to the simulation and synthesis of digital systems.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 3100.  (3-0-3)

CSCI 5120.  Topics in Information Security.  Complete examination of the issues and problems in providing security for information processing systems - security goals and vulnerabilities - encryption and decryption, secure general purpose operating systems and applications,  network security, Digital Signatures and Public Key Cryptosystems, security protocols, etc.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 4210.  (3-0-3)

CSCI 6120. Advanced Computer Architecture. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of  parallel computer architectures including   pipelining, interconnection networks, multiprocessors, and multicomputers.  It covers MISD, SIMD, and MIMD parallel processings. Parallel algorithm structures will also be discussed.   Prerequisite:  CSCI 4100.  (3-0-3)

CSCI 6220. Distributed Operating Systems. This course will cover taxonomy of distributed systems and distributed operating systems. Topics will include mutual exclusion, atomic transaction, deadlock handling, threads, processor allocation, scheduling, distributed file systems, distributed shared memory, and system programming issues in distributed systems. Prerequisite: CSCI 6200. (3-0-3)

CSCI 6230.  Internetworking Architecture and Protocols.  This course deals with the principles and issues underlying the provision of wide area connectivity through the interconnection of autonomous networks.  Detailed discussion of the problems and solution techniques that arise in internetworking.  Emphasis will be placed on the Internet architecture and protocols.  Topics include routing, quality of service and security.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 4210.  (3-0-3)

CSCI 6320. Advanced Software Engineering. This course is a follow-up to the software engineering course. Students are introduced to topics such as formal specification techniques and software verification and validation. Model-based and algebraic formal specification methods will be introduced in detail and applied to software development. Students will also be introduced to software quality metrics, software testing strategies, software configuration management and software reliability. Prerequisite: CSCI 4300. (3-0-3)

CSCI 6410. Advanced Database Design. This course will discuss emerging advanced database technology to expose and prepare the students with currently practiced database tools  in the industry. The students will do comparative study of different database systems. The course will also discuss design, development, and implementation strategies involving such database applications. Prerequisite: CSCI 4400. (3-0-3)

CSCI 6810. Modeling & Simulation. In this course, students are introduced to different types of simulation techniques and the concept of time in a simulation.  Different approaches to validate output data from a simulation, selecting probability distributions, random-number generators, transient and steady state analysis, variance reduction techniques and generating discrete and continuous random variates are also covered.  Prerequisites:  CSCI 3500. (3-0-3)

CSCI 6821. Advanced Computer Graphics. This course is an exposition of the techniques needed to generate and render three-dimensional computer images. It will provide a theoretical understanding of these techniques together with the programming expertise required to implement them. Prerequisite: CSCI 4820. (3-0-3)

CSCI 6831. Topics in Advanced Artificial Intelligence. This course provides an in-depth study of the major disciplines of Artificial Intelligence.  Possible topics include natural language processing, machine learning, expert systems, knowledge representation, neural networks, computer vision, robotics, speech recognition and synthesis, and genetic algorithms.  Prerequisites:  CSCI 4830.  (3-0-3)

CSCI 6900. Special Problems in CS and CIS. This course provides students with an opportunity to study and explore current computer science topics not covered in any other course. Students will also have the opportunity to design and implement software systems for business environments  and to expand on projects from previous classes Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (3-0-3)

CSCI 6930.  Internship.  The Internship gives students an opportunity to apply and extend the theoretical knowledge acquired in the classroom to a practical experience.  Students have to submit a formal paper describing and evaluating the internship experience and examining its implications for future work.  Prerequisite:  approval by the School of Computer and Information Sciences.  (3-0-3)

CSCI 7900. Thesis. With the approval of his/her major professor, a candidate for the M.S. degree may take 6 credit hours of thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of advisor. (6-0-6)

ECONOMICS

ECON 6811. Developmental Economics.  This course examines the theoretical and practical perspectives of economic analysis of development.  The goal is to provide a better understanding of the issues and choices faded by policy makers in developing countries and the effects of various policies.  After analyzing the history, principles, and theories of economic development, the course focuses on the importance of capital in economic development; the role of trade, fiscal and monetary policy, and industrialization; structural adjustment, foreign aid, and debt; education, population, human welfare, and sustainable development.  Prerequisites for this course are the successful completion of ECON 4811, ECON 2105, and ECON 2106, or permission of the instructor.  (3-0-3)

EDUCATION - CERTIFICATION

EDCF 5700. Internship in Educational Resources and Needs Assessment. An internship with emphasis on planning, selecting, preparing, and evaluating instructional materials in P-12 teaching fields and developing needs assessment for the classroom teacher to prepare for Georgia Teacher Observation Assessment (GTOI) or system assessment. Cannot be used to satisfy degree requirements. Prerequisites: Application filed with Director of Clinical Experiences one full semester in advance; permission of instructor; at least 9 semester hours of credit at Georgia Southwestern State University, which includes the materials and methods course specific to age and certification field requested. (0-15-6)

EDCF 5800. Internship in Educational Methodology. An internship with emphasis placed on curriculum planning, methodology, and evaluating instructional materials in P-12 teaching fields. Cannot be used to satisfy degree requirements. Prerequisite: EDCF 5700, Internship in Educational Resources and Needs Assessment. (0-15-6)

EARLY CHILDHOOD

EDEC 6100. Advanced Study of Early Childhood Language Arts. An intensive study of methods, materials, and experiences in the language arts as the basis for emotional, social, and mental growth by young children, evaluation of materials and procedures for teaching the language skills necessary for success in school. (3-0-3)

EDEC 6120. Children’s Literature for Early Childhood. An advanced study of various genre of books for children.  Emphasis is placed on identifying the various roles quality literature plays in the educational programs for children.  Pedagogical implications are incorporated.  (3-0-3)

EDEC 6400. Advanced Study of Early Childhood Science. A course which focuses on teaching strategies that promote equity in Science and Technology. It incorporates innovative instructional strategies, science content, educational technology, and classroom management. The participants apply their understandings by adapting, implementing, and evaluating equitable teaching strategies in their classrooms. (3-0-3)

EDEC 6500. Advanced Study of Early Childhood Social Studies. A study of recent developments in Early Childhood Social Studies with emphasis on current theory and experimentation in curriculum and teaching practices. (3-0-3)

EDEC 6600. The Teaching of Early Childhood Mathematics I. Activity oriented course that models student centered, discovery approaches to teaching the basic mathematics skills that are based on the NCTM Standards. Major focus will be placed on creating and maintaining a classroom management style that promotes a “safe” classroom environment and fosters the development of personal responsibility. Alternatives will be offered for teaching, assessing and grading student growth in mathematical thinking and mathematical power. (3-0-3)

EDEC 6610. The Teaching of Early Childhood Mathematics II. A continuation of EDEC 6600, with learning experiences focused on topics in number patterns, geometry, and general problem solving. Emphasis will be placed on teaching practices that promote the development of life-long learning skills and on alternative assessment/grading practices. Prerequisite: EDEC 6600. (3-0-3)

EDEC 6700. The Arts in Early Childhood.  The course investigates elements of art and principles of design that support children’s artistic development.  Various two-and three-dimensional art processes are explored in relation to how they can be used to support children’s affective and academic development across curricular areas.  (3-0-3)

EDEC 7020. Special Problems in Early Childhood Education. A study of problems related to specific curriculum and certification areas in the Early Childhood program. Emphasis is placed upon special projects and independent study. (May be repeated for credit in a different curriculum area.) (3-0-3)

EDEC 7050. Early Childhood Theoretical Frameworks and Their Application.  The course provides a comprehensive study of theories that provide a foundation for understanding young children and the impact of their growth and development for planning appropriate educational programs.  Emphasis in the course is placed on children in grades P-5.  The course also explores how various theories underlie teaching decisions in early childhood programs and practices.  (3-0-3)

EDEC 7110. Educational Computing and Language Development. A course designed to provide inservice teachers with an understanding of the major theories of language development and the uses of computers and computer software in the development of language and communication skills. Emphasis is given to written communication and to communication through Hypermedia. (3-0-3)

EDEC 7550.  Issues and Trends in Early Childhood Education.  The course examines issues, trends, and problems in early childhood education.  Information sources for research, including print and media resources, will be included.  Content will include conceptualizing, completing, and presenting an extensive literature review for a research project to enhance professional writing and presentation skills. (3-0-3)

EDEC 7750.  Assessment in Early Childhood Education.  The course provides an in-depth study of appropriate strategies for assessing the learning of young children.  Assessment instruments and procedures for examining development in the cognitive, physical, and social domains are included.  The course will also explore issues related to standardized testing in relation to the importance of testing in early childhood education.  (3-0-3)

EDEC 7800. Role of Collaboration in Early Childhood Education. This course is designed to acquaint and expand the knowledge of teachers in early childhood education with a variety of innovative programs in existence involving parents as partners in education. The history of parental involvement, research, leadership development, benefits to children, parents, school, and community, as well as strategies for promoting  parent involvement, are emphasized. (3-0-3)

EDEC 7900. Curriculum Strategies. The course provides a study of Early Childhood Education with emphasis on curriculum decision-making, and curriculum content.  Procedures for planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum appropriate for the young learner is presented. (3-0-3)

Specialist (Open Only to Admitted 6th Year Students)

EDEC 8000. Advanced Graduate Seminar in Early Childhood. Public policy, issues, and concerns as well as futuristic issues in Early Childhood Education will be presented for consideration in the open forum. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8080. Early Childhood Education in Modern Society. A study of contemporary Early Childhood Education with emphasis upon political and sociological elements, program development, and leaders in the field. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8100. Measurement and Evaluation in Early Childhood Education. Investigation and practical application of measurement techniques and instruments used in the evaluation of the growth of young children. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8120. Qualitative Research. A course designed to expand students’ understanding of educational research methodology. The course will explore currently accepted qualitative research methods and appropriate interpretations. Students will design a qualitative research proposal for implementation in their classrooms. This course is a prerequisite for EDEC 8780. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8380. Language Development and Reading. A study of productive and receptive language development and processes with implications for planningn and implementing appropriate language curriculum for children in grades P-5. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8400. Strategies for Teaching Science. Planning, implementation, and evaluation of early grades science programs will be emphasized. The class will be conducted in a seminar format with class activities built on the science programs of the students’ schools. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8480. Administration and Supervision of Early Childhood Programs. A course designed to support the development of teacher leaders in Early Childhood Education. Emphasis is placed on developing leadership skills in the areas of mentoring and supervising pre-service and new teachers, participating in site-based management, and providing leadership in areas of education accountability in Early Childhood Education. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8500. Strategies for Teaching Social Studies. A course designed to lead advanced students in the examination of instructional strategies, content material, and evaluation techniques applicable to Early Childhood social studies. Attention will focus on both cognitive and affective learning. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8600. Advanced Strategies for Teaching Early Childhood Mathematics. Advanced study of issues and techniques that are critical to effective Mathematics teaching and learning. Focused attention on diagnostic, instructional, and assessment techniques that involve self monitoring and self assessment. (3-0-3)

EDEC 8770. Trends and Issues in Early Childhood Education and Technology. An examination of Early Childhood Education as a dynamic field influencing and influenced by various political, social, and educational trends and issues. Emphasis is placed on examining contemporary issues and trends in relation to current education literature. (0-6-3)

EDEC 8780. Practicum in Early Childhood Education. A course designed to allow the student in the field to integrate theory and practice by enabling the student to test within the school environment appropriate teaching-learning programs. (0-6-3)

EDEC 8800. Readings in Early Childhood Education. A course in selected readings on Early Childhood Education. Open only to specialist level students. (3-0-3)

EDUCATION - MIDDLE GRADES

EDMG 6100. Advanced Study of Middle Grades Language Arts. An in-depth study of recent developments in teaching oral and written composition, spelling, handwriting, grammar, and usage in the middle school. (3-0-3)

EDMG 6120. Children’s Literature for the Middle Grades. An advanced study of the works of fine authors and illustrators, new and old, as well as the broad spectrum of contemporary and traditional young adult literature. A practical and explicit overview of ways in which teachers (4-8) can evaluate and select books and involve students in literature, with specific suggestions for goals and techniques. Exploration of adolescent preferences and aesthetic responses to visual aspects of their books. Emphasis is on the importance of extending literature throughout the school curriculum. (3-0-3)

EDMG 6200. The Teaching of Reading. An advanced study of instructional techniques and materials for the teaching of reading in grades 4-8. Emphasis is given to extension of reading competencies, word recognition, and comprehensive strategies required for success in content areas, and integrated literature-based reading programs, as well as instructional implications of psycholinguistic theory. (3-0-3)

EDMG 6210. Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Difficulties. Advanced study designed for the teaching of reading in grades 4-8 in identification, diagnosis, and remediation of reading difficulties. Emphasis is on diagnostic-prescriptive reading instruction through mastery of varied diagnostic instruments, instructional procedure, and materials appropriate for use with readers requiring remediation. Clinical experience includes a case study with a child. Prerequisite: Previous course in reading. (3-0-3)

EDMG 6280. Teaching Reading in the Content Fields. Designed to offer all content area teachers detailed and practical explanations of reading and study strategies needed by students to acquire and use new information. Instruction is built on research-based techniques for teaching these strategies in a broad range of disciplines. Emphasis is on helping students become more efficient, effective readers of content materials and facilitating their learning of the subject matter content. Designed for Middle Grades and secondary teachers and for reading majors. (3-0-3)

EDMG 6400. Advanced Study of Middle Grades Science. A course which is focused on teaching strategies that promote equity in science. Innovation instructional strategies, science content, educational technology and classroom management will be incorporated. The participants apply their understandings by adapting, implementing and evaluating teaching strategies in their classrooms. (2-2-3)

EDMG 6450. Science Workshop for Middle Grades Teachers. A workshop for updating the knowledge and skills of Middle Grades science teachers. Included are uses of technology in science instruction encompassing computers, software, and other media; laboratory activities; and the examination of commercial science programs. (3-0-3)

EDMG 6500. Advanced Study of Middle Grades Social Studies. A study of recent developments in Middle Grades social studies with emphasis on current theory and experimentation in curriculum and teaching practices. (3-0-3)

EDMG 6600. The Teaching of Middle Grades Mathematics I. Activity oriented course that models student centered, discovery approaches to ) teaching topics in problem solving, set theory, number theory, probability, and introductory geometry based on the NCTM Principles and Standards. “Best teaching practices” for mathematics instruction at the middle school level will be researched and analyzed. Also, alternatives will be offered for teaching and assessing student growth in mathematical thinking and mathematical power. (2-2-3)

EDMG 6610. The Teaching of Middle Grades Mathematics II. A continuation of EDMG 6600, with learning experiences focused on topics in statistics, measurement, and geometry. Emphasis will be placed on research into best practices that promote the development of life-long learning skills and on alternative assessment/grading practices for mathematics instruction in the middle grades. (2-2-3)

EDMG 6650. Investigations of Mathematical Art. A course designed to provide teachers with classroom tested ideas that will allow students to experience aesthetics in mathematics. By investigating patterns and geometric transformations students will create vivid and interesting posters and models to decorate any classroom grades 4-8, and at the same time learn how mathematical structures themselves are elegant and beautiful. (3-0-3)

EDMG 6700. The Arts in the Middle Grades. An advanced study of the role of the expressive arts in the development of young children with recommended practices in qualitative curriculum planning, together with laboratory projects that identify problems in Middle Grades art, including philosophical, motivational, and evaluative aspects. (3-0-3)

EDMG 7020. Special Problems in Middle Grades Education. An investigation into problems and issues related to middle school teaching and middle grades curricula. Special readings and field experiences required. (3-0-3)

EDMG 7110. Educational Computing and Language Development. A course which provides inservice teachers with an understanding of the major theories of language development and the use of computers and computer software in the development of language and communication skills. Emphasis is given to written communication and communication through Hypermedia. (3-0-3)

EDMG 7700. Middle Grades Growth and Development. A study of the human growth and development focusing on developmental characteristics and nature and needs of young adolescents. Field experience required. (3-0-3)

EDMG 7800. Innovations in Parent, Family and School Collaboration in Education. A course designed to acquaint and expand the knowledge of teachers in the field of education with a variety of innovative programs in existence involving parents as partners in education. The history of parental involvement, the benefits to children, parents, school, and the community, as well as research and leadership training in parental involvement are emphasized. Specific programs in early childhood, middle grades, and secondary fields will be examined. (3-0-3)

EDMG 7900. Middle Grades Curriculum Planning and Trends. A study of the content and methodology of Middle Grades school curricula. Emphasis is placed on trends in modern curriculum development focusing upon such issues as the nature of the pupil, the nature of learning, function and aims of the middle school, influence of society, and evaluation and revision of the middle school curriculum. (3-0-3)

Specialist (Open Only to Admitted 6th Year Students)

EDMG 8000. Advanced Seminar in Selected Discipline Areas. Study of objectives, competencies, content, techniques of instruction and remediation, materials, principles of evaluation and research in discipline area. Trends and problems in discipline area will also be emphasized. (3-0-3)

EDMG 8020. Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Middle Grades Education. Problems of organization, administration, and supervision of the middle schools with emphasis on proper staff utilization, instruction, and evaluation procedures, and approaches to the problem of influencing staff members in relation to efficiency. (3-0-3)

EDMG 8130. Special Problems in Middle Grades Education. A study of problems related to specific topical areas in the Middle Grades program. In-depth projects will be required as a part of the independent study process under an appropriate instructor. (3-0-3)

EDMG 8300. The Adolescent Learner. An advanced growth and development course covering the historical, biological, sociological, and moral realities of today’s teenagers. Emphasis will be placed on how to deal more effectively with adolescents in the school, home, and community. Prerequisite: A graduate course in human growth and development. (3-0-3)

EDMG 8380. Language Development and Reading. A course designed to examine the development and operation of an effective language arts program in the Middle Grades. Attention will be given to the four language arts areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. (3-0-3)

EDMG 8400. Strategies for Teaching Science. A course which focuses on thematic and science, technology, and society (STS) approaches to the curriculum. The participants take part in, review, and evaluate units from innovative curriculum projects and apply their understandings by adapting, implementing, and evaluating a unit in their classrooms. (3-0-3)

EDMG 8500. Strategies for Teaching Social Studies. A course designed to lead advanced students in the examination of instructional strategies, content material, and evaluation techniques applicable to Middle Grades social studies. Attention will focus on both cognitive and affective learning. (3-0-3)

EDMG 8600. Advanced Strategies for Teaching Middle Grades Mathematics. Advanced study of issues and techniques that are critical to effective mathematics teaching and learning. Focused attention on diagnostic, instructional, and assessment techniques that involve self monitoring and self assessment. Students will participate in a mathematics institute as they work with children in a closely supervised teaching situation in order that they might practice and improve their own teaching. Prerequisite: EDMG 6600. (3-0-3)

EDMG 8700. Strategies for Teaching Art in the Middle Grades. An in-depth study of various learning and teaching styles in art for Middle Grades Education. A focus will be made on innovative programs in the arts and the teaching strategies employed. (3-0-3)

PHEG 8050. Current Problems and Issues in Health and Physical Education for the Middle Grades. A study of problems met in a Middle Grades program of health and physical education. Special emphasis is given to problems encountered when teaching Middle Grades. (3-0-3)

EDUCATION - READING (P-12)

EDRG 6200. The Teaching of Reading. An advanced study of instructional techniques and materials for the teaching of reading from preschool through grade twelve. Emphasis is given to the extension of reading competencies, word recognition and comprehension strategies required for success in content areas, and integrated literature-based reading programs, as well as the instructional implications of the psycholinguistic theory. (3-0-3)

EDRG 6210. Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Difficulties. Advanced study designed for the teaching of reading from preschool through grade twelve in identification, diagnosis, and remediation of reading difficulties. Emphasis is on diagnostic-prescriptive reading instruction through mastery of varied diagnostic instruments, instructional procedures, and materials appropriate for use with readers requiring remediation. Clinical experience includes a case study with a child. Prerequisite: Previous course in reading. (3-0-3)

EDRG 6220. Teaching Reading in the Secondary School. An advanced study in methods and materials of teaching basic and developmental reading competencies to students in grades 7-12. Attention is given to the organization of reading programs, the special services in reading instruction, and the effective use of assessment devices in secondary schools. Designed for reading majors and secondary English teachers. (3-0-3)

EDRG 6230. Trends and Practices in the Teaching of Reading. A critical analysis of new programs, materials and methods, and developments in reading instruction. Emphasis is given to innovative reading programs as well as to current trends and issues in the teaching of reading. For Reading Majors only. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, previous course in reading. (3-0-3)

EDRG 6240. Special Problems in Reading Education. A seminar for reading majors only which provides students with an opportunity to study and explore reading topics from selections in the education and psychology libraries which are of individual interest and which strengthen a particular area in the student’s program or background. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; previous reading coursework. (3-0-3)

EDRG 6250. Organization and Supervision of the Reading Program. An analysis of the organization of reading programs P-12, and an investigation of varied supervision techniques. Focus is on the design, management, and evaluation of reading programs at the classroom, school, and district levels. Particular attention is given to the techniques of assessing needs, setting goals and objectives; determining program resource requirements; coordinating, organizing, and monitoring program development and implementation activities; and designing program evaluation strategies. For Reading Majors only. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, previous course in reading. (3-0-3)

EDRG 6280. Teaching of Reading in the Content Fields. Designed to offer all content area teachers detailed and practical explanations of reading and study strategies needed by students to acquire and use new information. Instruction is built on research-based techniques for teaching these strategies in a broad range of disciplines. Emphasis is on helping students become more efficient, effective readers of content materials and facilitating their learning of the subject matter content. Designed for Middle Grades and secondary teachers and for reading majors. (3-0-3)

EDUCATION - SECONDARY EDUCATION (7-12)

EDSC 7020. Special Problems in Secondary Education. A study of problems related to specific curriculum areas in the secondary program. Emphasis is placed upon special projects and independent study. (3-0-3)

EDSC 7700. Adolescent Growth and Development. A study of human growth and development from conception through aging with special readings and field experiences appropriate for the adolescent years. Field experience required. (3-1-3)

EDSC 7900. Secondary Curriculum Planning and Trends. A study of the content and methodology of secondary school curricula with emphasis upon trends in modern curriculum development. The course focuses on such issues as the nature of the pupil, the nature of learning, functions and aims of the school, influence of society, and evaluation and revision of curriculum. (3-0-3)

EDUCATION - SPECIAL EDUCATION (P-12)

EDSP 6000. Special Problems in Special Education. A study of problems related to curriculum and instruction in Special Education. Recent trends in the education of exceptional individuals. Emphasis is placed upon special projects and independent study. Prerequisite: EDSP 2010 or equivalent. May be repeated for credit. (1-0-1, 2-0-2, or 3-0-3)

EDSP 6040. Principles of Behavior Modification and Management of Classroom Behavior Problems. Application of psychological and educational techniques for management of behavioral and classroom problems. Emphasis on current use of behavior modification techniques in the school and home. Prerequisite: EDUC 7300 or permission of the instructor. Field experience required. (3-0-3)

EDSP 6050. Techniques of Counseling as Applied to Exceptional Individuals. Theories and techniques for counseling exceptional individuals and their families. A study of the interactions among exceptional individuals and their families, dynamics of family interaction, parental attitudes, and parental reactions. Prerequisite: EDSP 2010 and permission of instructor. (3-2-3)

EDSP 6060. Advanced Study of Language Development. An in-depth study of speech and language development of young individuals. An investigation of psycholinguistic processes of exceptional individuals and the techniques for working with psycholinguistic problems. Prerequisite: EDSP 2010 and permission of instructor. (3-0-3)

EDSP 6070. Curriculum Trends and Practices in Special Education. A study of the content and methodology of Special Education curricula with emphasis upon recent developments. May be repeated for credit. (1-0-1, 2-0-2, or 3-0-3)

EDSP 6110. Characteristics of Individuals with Mental Retardation/Intellectual Disabilities. Study of the nature and characteristics of individuals with intellectual disabilities, classification, etiology and incidence, psychological and biological aspects, sociological aspects, learning, and education. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 6120. Curriculum and Methods in the Education of Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities. Study of curriculum construction, classroom organization, and collaboration with others and to ancillary and community services. Prerequisites: EDSP 2010, EDSP 6110. Field experience required. (3-3-3)

EDSP 6130. Curriculum and Methods in the Education of Severe/Profound Intellectually Disabled Individuals. A study of curriculum construction, classroom organization, parental involvement, and ancillary services for students with profound intellectual disabilities. Materials and instructional methods are discussed and implemented in field settings. (3-2-3)

EDSP 6150. Practicum in Mental Retardation/Intellectual Disabilities. Supervised teaching and participation in an approved instructional setting with individuals with intellectual disabilities. Seminar is required. Prerequisites: Application filed with Special Education Coordinator one full semester in advance; permission of instructor; at least 6 semester hours from Georgia Southwestern State University including EDSP 6110 and EDSP 6120. May be repeated for credit. (0-15-3)

EDSP 6210. Characteristics of Gifted Individuals. Identification, characteristics, needs, and implications for educational planning for gifted individuals. (3-1-3)

EDSP 6220. Materials and Methods in the Education of the Gifted Individual. Study of the materials, methods, techniques, and approaches used in an instructional program for gifted students. (3-1-3)

EDSP 6230. Curriculum and Program Development for Gifted Education. An in-depth study of curriculum construction and program development for gifted and talented students P-12. Prerequisite: EDSP 6210. Field experience required. (3-1-3)

EDSP 6250. Practicum in Gifted Education I, II, III. Supervised teaching and participation in an approved instructional setting with gifted students. Seminar required. Prerequisites: Application filed with Special Education Coordinator one full semester in advance; permission of instructor; at least 6 hours from Georgia Southwestern State University including EDSP 6210 and EDSP 6220. May be repeated for credit. Field experience required. (0-15-3)

EDSP 6310. Characteristics of Individuals with Learning Disabilities. Study of the nature of learning disabilities with emphasis on definitions, causes, characteristics, and needs of individuals with learning disabilities. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 6320. Materials and Methods in the Education of Individuals with Learning Disabilities. Study of curriculum construction, resources, diagnosis, remediation practices, and working with families of individuals with learning disabilities. Prerequisites: EDSP 6310, EDSP 2010. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 6330. Individualization of Instruction: Diagnostic-Prescriptive Teaching. Analysis of the remediation process with emphasis on the diagnostic prescriptive approach as used with individuals with difficulty in learning. Includes the use of assessment instruments and Individualized Education Plans. Prerequisite: EDSP 7510 and permission of the instructor. Field experience required. (3-1-3)

EDSP 6350. Practicum in Learning Disabilities. Supervised teaching and participation in an approved instructional setting with learning disabled individuals. Seminar required. Prerequisites: Application filed with Special Education Coordinator one full semester in advance, permission of instructor; at least 6 semester hours from Georgia Southwestern State University including EDSP 6130 and EDSP 6320. May be repeated for credit. (0-15-3)

EDSP 6410. Characteristics of the Individual with Behavior Disorders. An in-depth study of the definition, identification, and characteristics of students with emotional or behavioral disorders as well as philosophical bases for treatment. Prerequisite: EDSP 2010. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 6420. Materials and Methods for Teaching Behavior Disordered and Emotionally Disturbed Individuals. Planning and implementing educational programs for individuals with behavior disorders and emotional disturbances. Emphasizes intervention techniques and behavior management. Methods, materials, and curriculum for regular education and self-contained settings. Prerequisites: EDSP 2010, EDSP 6410. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 6450. Practicum in Behavior Disorders/Emotional Disturbances. Supervised teaching and participation in an approved instructional setting with behavior disordered/emotionally disturbed individuals. Seminar required. Prerequisites: Application filed with Special Education coordinator one full semester in advance; at least 6 hours from Georgia Southwestern State University including EDSP 6410 and EDSP 6420. May be repeated for credit. (0-15-3)

EDSP 6550. Practicum in Mild Disabilities. Supervised teaching and participation in an approved instructional setting with individuals having mild disabilities. Seminar required. Prerequisites: Application filed with Special Education coordinator one full semester in advance; permission of instructor; at least 15 hours from Georgia Southwestern State University including EDSP 6410, EDSP 6110, EDSP 6310, and EDSP 6120 or EDSP 6320 or EDSP 6420. May be repeated for credit. (0-15-3)

EDSP 6610. Characteristics of Preschool Special Education Children. A study of the characteristics of preschool children needing Special Education, including severely developmentally delayed individuals. Course includes working with families in home services, parent training of disabled children, interdisciplinary teams, other agencies, and collaborative teaching. (3-2-3)

EDSP 6620. Methods and Curriculum in Preschool Special Education. A study of the methods and curriculum for preschool Special Education. Includes instructional methods and services in structured and unstructured settings for teaching children with severe developmental disabilities at the preschool level. Physical handling and assessment of preschool disabled children included. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 6630. Preschool Language Development. A study of preschool language development. Course includes pre-language and pre-cognitive development. Detailed study of language development and language disabilities for young disabled children is included. The use of diagnostic instruments and implications of communication and educational methods are studied. Field experience required. (3-2-3)

EDSP 6900. Secondary and Adult Programs in Special Education. Secondary, vocational, and adult programs for individuals with exceptional needs, including types of programs for various exceptionalities, occupational objectives, curricular content, and cooperation with community agencies. Prerequisite: EDSP 2010 and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (1-0-1, 2-0-2, or 3-0-3)

EDSP 7000. Special Topics in Special Education. Special Topics in Special Education on selected issues, problems, and literature. Prerequisite: Approval of the School Dean. May be repeated for credit. (1-0-1, 2-0-2, or 3-0-3)

EDSP 7050. Adaptive and Corrective Physical Education and Recreation. A study of principles and procedures for conducting a program of physical education and recreation appropriate for exceptional individuals. (3-0-3)

EDSP 7080. Legal, Ethical, and Professional Aspects of Special Education. A study of litigation, legislation, ethical and moral issues, and codes of professional conduct in the field of Special Education. (3-0-3)

EDSP 7120. Teaching Individuals with Severe and Profound Disabilities. A study of the nature, needs, and medical aspects of individuals with severe and multiple disabilities. Prerequisite: EDSP 2010. (3-1-3)

EDSP 7510. Psychoeducational Evaluation and Assessments. Study of assessment techniques and procedures for use with exceptional individuals. Experience in administration and reporting formal and informal diagnostic and prescriptive techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (3-0-3)

EDSP 7800. Administration and Supervision of Programs for Exceptional Individuals. Factors and processes involved in the administration and supervision of programs for exceptional individuals. Includes skills related to staff supervision, program development, and evaluation. (1-0-1, 2-0-2, or 3-0-3)

EDSP 7990. Seminar: Readings and Research in Special Education. Current research and topics in Special Education. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Must be taken within two semesters of graduation. May be repeated for credit. (3-0-3)

EDUCATION

EDUC 7000. Leadership in Education. A study of the issues related to induction of new teachers and supervision of preservice teachers with emphasis on mentoring and conferencing skills. Three years acceptable teaching experience in Georgia Public Schools (P-12), Practicum in Supervision, and completion of this course lead to the Teacher Support Specialist endorsement to a professional teaching certificate. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7010. Foundations of Public Education. A study of the historical, philosophical, socio-cultural, legal, political, economic, and technological foundations of American education. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7020. Special Problems in Education. A study of problems related to specific curriculum and certification areas. Emphasis is placed upon special projects and independent study. (May be repeated for credit in a different curriculum area.) (3-0-3)

EDUC 7030. Practicum in Supervision. A practicum for teachers to develop and practice the mentoring and supervision skills necessary to implement a successful Teacher Support Specialist program. Upon successful completion of this course and three years acceptable teaching experience in Georgia Public Schools (P-12), teachers will be eligible for Teacher Support Specialist endorsement. Prerequisite: Leadership in Education (EDUC 7000). (0-30-3)

EDUC 7040. The Teacher and the Law. A study of the legal ramifications of decisions in the school. Case studies and case law will be analyzed. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7070. Computer Applications for Curriculum and Classroom. To provide teachers with an understanding of the capabilities, uses, and limitations of computers, related technology, and software as instructional, management, and personal tools. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7080. Introduction to Statistics in Health and Physical Education. A course designed to introduce basic statistical concepts and their application to Health and Physical Education research problems. Topics include issues related to descriptive and inferential statistics. (Required for students in the Health and Physical Education program). (3-0-3)

EDUC 7100. Design and Development of Computer-based Instructional Media. A course focused on presentation and multimedia authoring programs for personal computers. The intent is to give the teachers the ability to create and integrate computer presentations in their daily instruction. A prior knowledge of personal computers is necessary. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7110. Educational Computing and Language Development. A course designed to provide inservice teachers with an understanding of the major theories of language development and the use of computers and computer software in the development of language and in the development of communication skills. Emphasis is given to written communication, to communication through Hypermedia software, and to Internet communication. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7150. Assessment and Management of Classroom Problems. A study of appropriate techniques of classroom management and discipline relating to student behavior, learning, and motivation. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7300. Conditions and Processes of Learning. Study of the learner, the learning process, and learning situations as they interrelate in the classroom.

EDUC 7400. Methodology of Educational Research. A study of methods and techniques used in analyzing and solving educational problems. A research proposal will be developed. This course should be taken on campus within the student’s initial 12 hours of study. (3-0-3)

EDUC 741X. Thesis Option I. Thesis option is open to all students who elect study in depth in a specific area. Prerequisite: EDUC 7400. (1-0-3)

EDUC 741Y. Thesis Option II. Thesis option is open to all students who elect study in depth in a specific area. Prerequisite: EDUC 7400. (1-0-3)

EDUC 7420. Directed Study or Field Project. A research-oriented study or project selected according to interests or needs of student. Prerequisite: EDUC 7400. (1-0-3)

EDUC 7510. Educational Measurement and Evaluation. Study of formal and informal tests and measurements and their role in student-based decisions regarding eligibility for programs, classification, and instructional delivery. Includes test construction, selection, interpretation, and criteria for administration. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7600. Problems in Producing and Utilizing Instructional Materials. Instruction in planning, selecting, producing, utilizing, and evaluating instructional materials. Problems selected will reflect the student’s interest and needs. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7700. Growth and Development. A study of human growth and development from conception through aging with special readings. Field experience required. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7800. Innovations in Parent, Family and School Collaboration in Education. A course designed to acquaint and expand the knowledge of teachers in the field of education with a variety of innovative programs in existence involving parents as partners in education. The history of parental involvement, the benefits to children, parents, school, and the community as well as research and leadership training in parental involvement are emphasized. Specific programs in early childhood, middle grades, and secondary fields will be examined. (3-0-3)

EDUC 7900. Curriculum Planning and Trends. A study of the content and methodology of the total school curricula with emphasis upon procedures and factors in curriculum development such as the nature of the pupil, the nature of learning, function and aims of the school, influence of society and its culture and values, evaluation and revision of the program, consideration of recent trends in curriculum development. (3-0-3)

SPECIALIST (Open only to the 6th year student)

EDUC 8010. Philosophy of Education. An in-depth investigation of the alternatives of philosophical approaches to education and the relevance to education decision making. (3-0-3)

EDUC 8110. Advanced Research Methodology. A study of advanced research methodology and applied research. Problem solving, measurement, experimental design consideration, and report presentation. (3-0-3)

ENGLISH

ENGL 5000. Seminar in Literary Criticism and Bibliography. This course examines the principle schools of contemporary literary theory and their practical application to literature and to the classroom.  In addition, the student will be given the opportunity to learn and practice advanced methods of literary research.  (Must be taken with GSW faculty, either on campus or on-line).  (3-0-3)

ENGL 5215.  Seminar in Advanced Composition.  Emphasizes the various methods of discourse as a basis for individual writing and for the teaching of writing.  The course also includes a study of research in the teaching of writing.  Recommended for graduate students who are interested in writing and teaching writing.  (3-0-3)

ENGL 5225. Seminar in Introductory Studies in Composition. A survey of the history and theories of rhetoric, an introduction to research in composition, and a study of approaches to composition with emphasis on writing as a process. (3-0-3)

ENGL 6020. Seminar in the History of the English Language.  This seminar is an intensive study of the history of English from its origin as the purely oral language of the Proto-Indo-Europeans to its current status as the lingua franca of much of the so-called first world. (3-0-3)

ENGL 6170.  Seminar in Advanced Studies in British Literature- Special Topics.  An in-depth, graduate seminar on a major author, or authors, time period, or theme in British literary studies.  (3-0-3)

ENGL 6230.  Seminar in Advanced Studies in American Literature- Special Topics.  An in-depth, graduate seminar on a major author, or authors, time period, or theme in American literary studies.  (3-0-3)

ENGL 6950. Seminar in Special Problems in the Teaching of English. A course to study issues in the teaching of composition K-12 with specific emphasis on developing a successful model for staff development. (3-0-3)

GEOLOGY

GEOL 5111. Special Problems in Earth Science. A graduate-level course to provide the graduate student with an opportunity to follow a specific program of study in the Earth sciences under the direction of an instructor of the student’s choice. 3 hours credit. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. (3-0-3)

GEOL 6121. Earth Science for Teachers. A physical geology course designed for middle and secondary science teachers. An integrated lab and lecture format will provide a better understanding of geologic processes and proficiency in distinguishing and classifying common Earth materials. The course will also allow the participants to develop new classroom techniques and assemble useful resource materials. Prerequisite: None. (3-2-4)

GEOL 6131. Environmental Science for Teachers. An experience-oriented environmental science course that utilizes field trips, laboratory experiments, data interpretation exercises, and up-to-date resource materials. Teaching techniques will be emphasized that not only involve the participants in the collection and interpretation of environmental data, but also increase their awareness and interest in widespread environmental problems. Prerequisite: None. (3-2-4)

GEOL 6141. Special Problems in Earth Science. Individual work providing the student an opportunity to follow a specific program of study under the direction of a qualified instructor of his choice. A term research paper is required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (3-2-4)

HISTORY

HIST 5000. Advanced Historiography. This class is required of all those in the M.Ed. Program in Social Science/History.  It requires students to integrate the basic concepts, methods, and sub fields of history, and to relate them to the contemporary world. (3-0-3)

HIST 5570. Advanced Studies in the American Civil War Era. An advanced study of specialized issues and problems of the American Civil War era. (3-0-3)

HIST 5810. Georgia Studies. Advanced coursework in the history of Georgia. (3-0-3)

HIST 7010. Studies in Early Modern European History (to 1500). Seminar in aspects of European history before 1500. (3-0-3)

HIST 7020. Studies in Modern European History (Since 1500). Seminar in aspects of European history since 1500. (3-0-3)

HIST 7035. Studies in United States History.  Directed readings and research in selected topics in the history of the United States, with a primary focus on historiographical questions.  (3-0-3)

HIST 7800. Studies in the Emergence of the Third World.  A research seminar in aspects of Third World history since 1945. (3-0-3)

MATHEMATICS

MATH 5000.  Algebra for Middle Grades.  Introduces students to concepts of algebra appropriate for middle grades classrooms, including equation, functions, rates of change, modeling, and real-world applications.  The use of calculators, electronic resources and manipulatives is an integral element of this course.  Offered in alternate summer terms.  Prerequisite:  Graduate standing.  (3-0-3)

MATH 5001.  Geometry for Middle Grades.  Introduces students to concepts of geometry appropriate for middle grades classrooms, including construction and similarity, measurement, motion geometry, transformations and tessellations, along with applications to image processing, global positioning systems, robotics, art, and architecture.  Offered in alternate summer terms.  Prerequisite:  Graduate standing.  (3-0-3)

MATH 5002.  Number Theory and Discrete Probability for Middle Grades.  Introduces students to concepts of number theory and finite probability appropriate for middle grades classrooms, including number bases, primes, congruence arithmetic, counting principles, discrete probability models, along with applications to secret codes, random number models, geometry, art, and simple games of chance.  Offered in alternate summer terms.  Prerequisite:  Graduate standing.  (3-0-3)

MATH 5003.  Statistics for Middle Grades.  Introduces students to concepts of statistics appropriate for middle grades classrooms, including exploratory data analysis, relationships (correlation and causality), inference, and resampling statistics.  Offered in alternate summer terms.  Prerequisite:  Graduate standing.  (3-0-3)

MATH 6618. Advanced Scientific Computation. This course is designed to give graduate students experience in using advanced numerical techniques that are a part of modern scientific computing. Topics include parallel and vector computing, discretization and large sparse systems, direct and parallel-direct methods, iterative and conjugate gradient-type methods, level set methods. Prerequisite: graduate standing and MATH 3320 or its equivalent. Offered yearly in Summer Term. (3-0-3)

MATH 6619. Computational Geometry. This course is designed to give graduate students a working knowledge of algorithms for solving geometric problems on a computer. Topics include polygonal triangulation and partitioning, convex hulls, Voronoi diagrams and arrangements, search and intersection algorithms, motion planning, robustness, and randomized algorithms. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Offered Summer Term in alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 6620. Operations Research. This course is designed to give graduate students experience in using a wide variety of mathematical techniques that are part of the decision process in the operations of organized systems. Topics include linear programming, mathematical programming (networks, dynamic, integer and non-linear programming), probabilistic models and simulation. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Offered Summer Term in alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 6640. Partial Differential Equations. This course introduces graduate students to those elements of partial differential equations that play a central role in science, geometry, analysis and computational modeling. Prerequisites: graduate standing and MATH 3313. Offered Fall Semester of alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 6642. Complex Analysis. This course provides graduate students with an introduction to the theory of functions of one complex variable and its applications. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Offered Spring Semester of alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 6675. Special Problems in Mathematics. Individual work providing students with the opportunity to follow a specific program of study under the direction of a qualified instructor. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Offered when enrollment justifies. (3-0-3)

MATH 7708. Materials and Methods for Mathematics. Curriculum resources and modern, effective methods of instruction for teachers, supervisors and consultants of mathematics. Special attention is paid to cooperative learning, mathematical manipulatives, calculator and computer techniques, applied mathematics, and grant proposal preparation. Prerequisite: admission to the T-5 or T-6 program. Offered Summer Term of alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 7709. Applied Numerical Linear Algebra. This course is designed to give graduate students experience in using a wide variety of numerical techniques from linear algebra that have applications to basic science, image processing, robotics, optimal processing. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Offered Summer Term in alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 7710. Foundations of Algebra. The course offers graduate students a comprehensive overview of algebraic theories and structures including number theory, theory of equations and number fields, as they relate to the teaching of secondary mathematics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Offered Summer Term of alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 7711. Foundations of Statistics. This course is designed to give teachers of secondary mathematics a rigorous overview of probability and statistics, following AP and NCTM guidelines. Prerequisites: MATH 2204 and graduate standing. Offered Spring Semester alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 7712. Foundations of Geometry. A study of Euclidean axiomatic geometry, betweenness, congruence, parallelism, axiomatic systems, and non-Euclidean geometries. Prerequisite: MATH 3002 or permission of instructor, and graduate standing. Offered in Summer Term of alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 7713. Foundations of Analysis. This course is designed to give teachers of calculus in secondary schools a rigorous overview of the subject, following AP and NCTM guidelines. Prerequisites: MATH 2221 and graduate standing. Offered Summer Term in alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 7715. Algebraic Geometry I. This course introduces students to modern computational algebraic geometry using algorithms of Buchberger and Hironaka. Topics include affine varieties, Groebner bases, elimination theory, nullstellensatz, applications to robotics and automatic geometric theorem proving. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Offered Summer Term in alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 7716. Algebraic Geometry II. A continuation of Algebraic Geometry I. Topics include correspondence principles, invariance, dimension, projective models, and applications to computer vision. Prerequisite: MATH 7715. Offered Summer Term in alternate years. (3-0-3)

MATH 7775. Topics in Mathematics and Technology.  Survey of advanced topics in mathematics and technology for students at the post master level in mathematics education.  Topics include image processing, geographic information systems, programmable robotics, internet applications and security, electronic modeling and analysis.  Offered as needed.  (3-0-3)

MATH 7790. History and Philosophy of Mathematics. Graduate level survey with emphasis on topical and thematic research, and their use in teaching mathematics.  Prerequisites:  MATH 2221, or permission of instructor, and graduate standing.  Offered every Fall semester.  (3-0-3)

HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

PHEG 6000. Problems and Trends in Health and Physical Education. A study of the current pertinent problems and trends an instructor may expect to encounter when teaching health and physical education. (3-0-3)

PHEG 6010. Physiology of Exercise. Lectures and readings in current literature to provide reasonable depth in selected areas of physiology as applied to activity and health. Lab fee required. (3-1-3)

PHEG 6020. Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries. Analysis of common athletic injuries, conditioning, and safety practices. (3-0-3)

PHEG 6030. Foundations in Health and Physical Education. A study of the history, philosophy, concepts, and scientific foundations of health and physical education. (3-0-3)

PHEG 6050. Physical Education in the Elementary School. A study of current trends and developments in activity programs for elementary school physical education. (3-2-3)

PHEG 7010. Organization and Administration of Health and Physical Education. Basic principles and procedures for the effective organization, administration, and supervision of health and physical education programs. (3-0-3)

PHEG 7020. Measurements and Evaluations in Health and Physical Education. The selection, application, and evaluation of certain existing tests and measures appropriate in health and physical education. (3-1-3)

PHEG 7030. School Health Program. Principles, procedures, materials, and methods of school health education. (3-1-3)

PHEG 7040. Curriculum Construction in Health and Physical Education. Deals with the principles, problems, and procedures in the development of the physical education and health education curriculum in public schools. (3-0-3)

PHEG 7050. Adaptive and Corrective Physical Education. Emphasis upon the acquisition of specific information about the causes, nature, and psychological implications of the various handicapping disabilities, and to translate medical findings in terms of needed physical activities. (3-1-3)

PHEG 7060. Motor Learning. Presents research and theory of learning, performance, and related factors as applied to gross motor skills, intended for teachers, coaches, and those concerned with human performance in motor activity. (3-0-3)

PHEG 7070. Readings in Health. Deals with current research in the field of health designed to help guide and inform the nonprofessional health consumer. (3-0-3)

PHEG 8050. Current Problems and Issues in Health and Physical Education for Middle Grades. A study of current problems and trends encountered when teaching Health and Physical Education in the Middle Grades. (3-0-3)

PHYSICS

PHYS 5111. Special Problems in Physics. The course provides graduate students with an opportunity to follow a specific program of study in physics under the direction of an instructor of their choice. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. (3-0-3)

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 6100. Political Parties.  A study of American political parties as political activists or organizations, coalitions of political leaders, coalitions of voters, and their functions in campaigns and elections.  This course will analyze scholarly literature on each part of the tripartite party and their roles in elections, as ell as on the conceptualization and development of parties, and their interactions to define a party system.  (3-0-3)

POLS 6240. American Political Behavior. This course examines the research, approaches, methods, and literature on mass political behavior in the U.S.  (3-0-3)

POLS 6470. The Presidency. This course examines the research, theoretical approaches, methods, and literature on the American Presidency and on presidential nominations, campaigns, and elections. (3-0-3)

POLS 6630. Seminar in International Relations. An examination of the major theoretical frameworks and methodologies in the study of international relations.  Attention is given to debates over theories of power, anarcy, cooperation, and organization in the international system. (3-0-3)

POLS 7010. Seminar in Comparative Politics. This course presents the theories, concepts, issues, and debates in comparative politics.  The course emphasizes the logic of comparative inquiry as applied to political behavior and institutional arrangements.  Attention is given to case study and historical analysis methodologies versus formal theory and statistical approaches to comparative analysis. (3-0-3)

POLS 7570. Studies in the Structure of American Government.  This seminar will focus on the basic underlying principles of American government as explicated by the U.S. Supreme Court. (3-0-3)

POLS 7580. Studies in Civil Rights and Liberties.  This seminar will focus on constitutional rights and liberties as explicated by the U.S. Supreme Court. (3-0-3)

POLS 7700. Seminar in Political Philosophy.  This seminar will focus on the classic works of political philosophy and the perennial issues with which it deals.  (3-0-3)

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 5792. Psychology Internship. Internships with social service agencies are available for qualified students. See graduate advisor for information. (0-7-3)

PSYC 579A. Special Problems in Psychology. Prerequisite: Approval of advisor and permission of Department Chair. (3-0-3)

SOCIOLOGY

SOCI 5792. Sociology Internship. Internships with social service agencies are available for qualified students. See graduate advisor for information. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair. (3-0-3)

SOCI 579A. Special Problems in Sociology. A crucial problem in sociology is explored in-depth by the student and instructor. Special permission of the Department Chair is required to take this course. (3-0-3)

SOCIAL SCIENCES

SOSC 7990. Special Topics in Social Science. A course on selected issues, problems, and literature in social science. (3-0-3)